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13

I'd say avoid the "we're too busy" cliche - even if the employer was too busy, they would still need reasons to hire the players over some other group. Here's a couple of ideas, followed by broad guidelines for hooks that involve 'hiring': The players are supposed to be professional adventurers. That means they know how to plan survival, and they also ...


11

(Having seen your Ravenloft question earlier, which implies that you're familiar with that setting, I'd especially recommend the following): Bring them in through Ravenloft. First have the PC enter the demiplane of dread, then have them wander through -- practically to toughen them up -- a few, more and more desert-like domains (possibly encountering a ...


11

Consider having the characters designed so that there is some meaningful reason for them to be the ones selected. I remember one campaign I played (Planescape) in where some red dragon asked us first-level scrubs to go find her precious stolen dragon egg. My response to that was "You must not want it back very much!" Contrast another campaign (Eberron), ...


9

Some of the ways I've done it before, or plan to do it this time: The Party are expendable; the mission success rate is expected to be low (that's why you need heros), and it's not worth sending our men for that reason The worry I have with this is that the party might not like the idea of dying! No tracebacks; We don't think you'll die, but if you do ...


9

Having read nearly the entirety of the Drizzt series, I am fairly certain that he never actually met a Paladin. However, I have a theory as to why. See, if a Paladin were present, then simply by looking at him he could confirm that Drizzt was not evil, and thus the majority of the social drama Drizzt found himself apart of would not have occurred. You see, ...


8

Reading between the lines, their argument about detect evil is not their real objection. The real problem is that they expect an evil character in a good/neutral group will be a backstabbing, disruptive jerk, and lots of players have direct experience with games and groups being destroyed because of allowing one evil character in a group. The detect evil ...


8

Being the culprit of this question (i play the dwarven girl in question) giving some thought and checking in the novels (mainly the drizzt novels, as those focus around a lot on Mithril Hall and its dwarven inhabitants). I think i can give an answer: First and formost: Dwarves are neither small humans, nor are they all the same in the broad sense (they do ...


7

There is a specific Feywild for the Underdark, and it's called the Feydark It is found in the Underdark Supplement for 4e. Here is an Excerpt about the Feydark: http://www.wizards.com/dnd/Article.aspx?x=dnd/4ex/20100108


5

A) I haven't tried this, but why not start them off as kind of peons in a larger expedition that suffers a series of calamities until the PC are (or almost are) the only ones left. Something like, three ships set sail -- one gets eaten by a kracken, one sets up camp somewhere, and the last one (the one with the PCs) gets trapped in ice/runs into ...


4

Not that the other answers aren't excellent, but I was bemused by the question I'm trying to gather reasons why the PCs would be hired in the first place, when professional agents might be preferable? Unless they're a very odd party indeed (eg, all have accepted employment with the army of some local duke), they are all professional agents. What do ...


4

If you've always struggled with this kind of opener, why not choose a different one? For example, instead of heroes-for-hire recruited at Ye Olde Walmart, the party could be people of the realm that are involved in the talks about Returned Abeir and take the initiative to go on their own to investigate. The plot could also be a trap to get rid of the ...


3

I'm not entirely familiar with the 4e Forgotten Realms, but a few ideas: How important is it for the noble house/government agency to investigate this new continent? If the answer is "not hugely", then the answer could be that your party is cheaper than professional agents. You might also run an intro session where your party comes across this noble ...


3

Reconnaissance. The king hires the PCs to gather data about the continent (map, major strongholds, public dissent) to be used for an [insert evil plot]. The clueless PCs can't tip off the plan. Backstory. One (or more) of the PCs has a connection from there. Ask the players to work themselves into the reason. Works best at character creation. ...


3

In my D&D games, I allow players to have evil PCs. But I also warn them that if they backstab the party, I will do nothing to stop the party from seeking revenge. This generally yields players who are more interested in characters with selfish, self-serving evil than anything suicidally crazy.


2

A lot of the disconnect you may be experiencing is your history with AD&D. In a novel, the writer sets forth certain things to be expected in the setting, and does things that are outside of the norm in order to satisfy the requirements of his narrative. These things just are part of the background, and you go with it. The same thing can be said for ...


2

Frog God Games recently released The Tome of Adventure Design (which says it's for Pathfinder and/or Swords & Wizardry, but is really system-agnostic so long as you're talking about the fantasy genre), which I've been reading over the last week. It's mainly a book of tables to help get the creative juices flowing and help you come up with adventure ...


2

If it's a brand new continent, and conditions at home aren't great, they could be colonists. Report back, sure, but the whole group isn't expected to return. If interest is great enough, then perhaps there was a lottery to decide who would be allowed to go in the first wave and claim land, etc. That gives you a poor, unskilled commoner contingent of a ...


2

Some ideas from the perspective of a human character from a region that doesn't really know much more than the stereotypical version of Dwarves. A particularly interesting natural shape of crystal Worked metal objects from a fashionable artisan A tablet with a poem in Dwarven runes A token that represents a good memory for you


1

A Paladin is lawful just because you detect someone is Evil does not mean that they will do an Evil acts. It is the doing an act that is Evil and punishable. You can't just walk down the street as a Paladin and kill anyone the Detects Evil, that is called a Vigilante and most civilised placed lock people up for that and his god should punish them, as ...


1

This is a great chance to advance anything you want to have happen in the campaign. For example, if you want to develop the character background further, have them belong to some organization (city guard, magical college) you want to establish. You could have characters make something up if you want them involved in the narrative. They might claim to be ...



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