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26

This falls under the principle of include three clues for everything. It also is well suited to the approach of using environment-based storytelling. Use Environment-Based Storytelling Introduce the puzzle setting first and let the players be confused over the weird specificity. I like the petrified inhabitants part; maybe have the husband-farmer and ...


12

Dungeon World I can honestly say I've never seen a game recommendation question that's screamed the name of my favourite fantasy RPG so loudly. I've played Dungeon World with two players (my Significant Other and a friend with myself as GM) and unlike its parent game, Apocalypse World, I found it coped quite smoothly. The introduction even bills it as a ...


8

The game was called FRUP. It was never released (one of the casualties of the collapse of Guardians of Order), but the story of it — and the preview of the game from 1995 — are available at WhatIsFRUP.com.


5

I suggest.. DSA ("Das Schwarze Auge"), 3rd Edition It was my first RPG system, is originally in German and has been around in many versions since 25 years or more probably. Part I Suitable for just two players (+ game master) We have played many campaigns and adventures this way, and it works very well. If you play prefabricated adventures you might ...


4

The key to an epic adventure is not to plan a perfect puzzle, but to plan the story of a perfect puzzle. Players shouldn't find clues where you left them; players should find clues where you let them. Keep a good balance between "too easy" and "too hard", and your players will boast of your brilliance for ages to come. With that in mind, write down a a ...


3

Tuck the clues into the descriptions of the rooms. Each person has one defining object in their room, but it might not be immediately obvious if you're not in the right frame of mind, especially if you make the descriptions robust enough that it doesn't stick out. Of course, alter these to fit your setting, but here are some ideas: A picture of a castle ...


3

Multiverser (published 1997), has a system in which the PC is an alternate version of the player. The game starts with the DM describing you dying, and then you start controlling yourself in another universe. Whenever you die, you go to another universe. Anyone who travels this way is known as a 'verser'. The universe can range from fantasy to sci-fi. ...


2

Possible answers: Even very powerful beings can be brought down by many, many not so powerful beings. It is even true today in a realistic setting: If you e.g. fight against a 100 men tribe with spears and you alone are equipped with assault rifles and magazines, you will still lose if they charge you (human wave attack). Yes, they will have terrible ...


2

Timelords (1987 for 1st edition, 1990 for 2nd) was another RPG that had the players generate characters based on themselves. It was not actually a fantasy game, but a time travel game. It did have, as a default setting, the idea that the GM had brought a strange new d20 to the game session, which turned out to be a timetravelling device. The device ...


1

Suspicious Honesty First off, there are meta factors to consider. It's not just about finding the lies, but finding the truth (hence my question "How to Determine Honest Sincerity"). Sometimes even the mundane methods can throw things off because if you ask your players right off to roll a Sense Motive/Awareness+Investigation/Wits+Awareness/etc. they ...



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