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RPGGeek As with many "directory" questions, the geek is your friend. Go to the RPG page for Fate Core on RPGGeek. Under "Linked Items" select "Scenario / Adventure / Module" It includes FAE items, as explained on the page and on the Evil Hat site.


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You have a few questions all rolled into one, so I'm going to tackle them one at a time. Does this mean that, for a stealthy character attacking another character who is unaware of their presence, they would be able to (1) use stealth to create an advantage, (putting a freely-invokable aspect on themselves) Whenever it's appropriate, you can make ...


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This is one of those cases where it's all about gut instincts and common sense. For example, being Well hidden could justify getting passive opposition (your target won't see you coming), but probably not getting a bonus on the attack that ensues (being hidden does nothing to improve your ability to throw a punch / shoot straight). Rewrite it as Ready to ...


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Evil Hat has pay what you want adventures called World of Adventure that can easily be run in FAE. The Fate Codex also comes with FAE quick start adventures. Aside from these, pretty much any Fate Core adventure can be turned into an FAE adventure.


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Aspects are true all the time. You pay for an aspect when you want it to have mechanical consequences (i.e. when you want it to have an effect on the story). Yes the soldier might recognize him. If he wants to use that recognition to get the soldier to do something for him, then he needs to pay. Courtoorm Conspirator He would easily be known at the court, ...


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Caveat: You say you want to run a lethal game, but what do your players want? Rememeber that everyone's there to have fun, and some players may not enjoy investing lots of time and effort creating a character, only to lose it. From this point on, I'm going to assume that you've discussed this with your group, and that everyone is already on board with ...


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All of the fluff about narrative and story aside, Fate, like all other RPGs, has a mechanic for death; if you get taken out of combat and your opponent wants you dead, you're dead. Regardless of how anyone may feel about what death actually means in the greater scheme of the story, the rules themselves are pretty simple. So, how do you make Fate "deadly"? ...


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The SRD says... This may seem self-evident, but it should be called out anyway—the aspects on your character sheet are true of your character at all times, not just when they’re invoked or compelled. [...] Inserting these kinds of aspect-related details into your narration can help your game seem more vivid and consistent, even when you’re not ...


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In Fate Core you invoke aspects to improve rolls or passive opposition The Fate Core rules are clear about this. Invoking an aspect is described on FC 68 and gives the following things you can do when you invoke an aspect: Reroll all your dice. Pass a +2 benefit to another character’s roll, if it’s reasonable that the aspect you’re invoking would ...


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I'm going to create a completely system-agnostic answer here, but it will probably apply to you, especially considering the example of A Song of Ice and Fire. The reason that characters can drop like flies, even semi-randomly, in A Song of Ice and Fire without it detracting massively from the story, is because the story isn't about them. If someone whose ...


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I agree that sudden character death is mostly boring. It is the threat of sudden character death that makes a story interesting. Unfortunately, that threat has to be real, otherwise it won't have any effect. Players will soon stop believing you if you say they could die any moment but they just don't. One mechanism I used for a cyberpunk Fate game I'm ...


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Let's see... looking at the things one can do with aspects: Compel them, Tag them, invoke them, justify a narrative declaration with them... Aspects also are already a declared narrative truth if worded correctly. (see p. 76.) The general guideline should be: "does this amount to a narrative declaration?" and "does this bypass what should be rolled for?" ...


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There's a very simple principle. Your concession has to be acceptable to your opponent. If it is not, you can discuss and find a middle ground. If you still cannot get on the same page, then the conflict isn't over yet. Continue until someone's taken out. Just like a game of Go, the conflict ends when everybody agrees that it ends.


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It could work. How well depends on the fiction, the player, and you. I appreciate the thing you're trying to do, and yes, Fate is pretty good at handling these kinds of Aspects. However, in cases like this, you'll want to make sure that everyone agrees what they mean. Take "Fastest Man Alive," for example. In a real-world kind of game, that might mean you ...


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Fate rolls and mechanisms are not about what happens. They are about who gets the right to tell what happens. If you win a fate roll, you get to tell what happens. If you fail, your opponent gets that opportunitiy. Aspects somewhat constrain that ability by defining established "truths" about the world. The story you tell must not contradict existing ...


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There's a distinct demarcation in games between the Player and the Character. And in most games when such things come up, it's relegating the player to the same position as the character- and trying to force the player to solve problems is if he is the character. There is nothing wrong with that approach, in any game. And there's also nothing wrong with ...


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Players working together like this is normal and expected. It's all fine as long as the player with the present PC is not bothered by the input from the other players and has the final say. Fate Core, page 4 Both players and gamemasters also have a secondary job: make everyone around you look awesome. Fate is best as a collaborative endeavor, with ...


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Compels Have Teeth The thing with compels is that they are only worth fate points if they have teeth. The end of each mad-lib is the most important part: Unfortunately, [blank] would happen to you. Damn your luck. or This goes wrong when [blank] happens. That blank is the important part; it tells us what complication is happening. If there are ...


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The problem here began long before the player ran out of Fate points, when he took an aspect to solely represent his father's sword and expected to use it on virtually every action just to represent the utility of having a sword. Fate Core, on the "Intro to Choosing Aspects" on page 36 says of choosing aspects: Aspects which don’t help you tell a good ...


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I would suggest that it might be a problem with the way the character is created. An aspect is sometimes beneficial, and is sometimes detrimental, and sometimes has mechanical effect at all. A stunt always provides a clear and reliable mechanical bonus. So, if the sword in question was supposed to be unquestionably better than other swords in all ...


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The key to conceding from a compelled action lies in understanding the narrative purpose of compels and concessions: they make scenes more dramatic by adding new complications to the story. So if a werewolf gets compelled to attack his friends, it's an excellent complication with awesome dramatic tension. But we don't want to just kill everyone off--that's ...


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Does conceding make sense within the narrative? Has something happened to make it make sense in the narrative for the Ravenous and Bloodthirsty Wolf to want to withdraw from the conflict before obtaining its desired outcome? If so, absolutely. Come to an agreement with the GM and other players about how the conflict should resolve itself. If not... Why ...


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I'm going to dodge the main question, because it's a situation that shouldn't come up. Here's why: The situation you've outlined there involves at least two compels, not one. The first compel is the one already mentioned, which results in the transformation if the player accepts. The second compel, which you've skipped in the example, is compelling Ravenous ...


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The important thing your player must understand is that the sword does not give him an ongoing bonus because his roll isn't about if he can hit with the sword. His roll is about if he gets to tell a bit of the story about the swordfight in question. There's a free bonus (free invoke) for people who create new story elements (create advantage), and a paid ...


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Fate is about narration, not simulation I think the first thing you have to understand here is that Fate, unlike many other popular rpgs (for example D&D) is about narration, not simulation. So the proper question is not, "What makes most sense in real world terms when someone falls from zone 1 or zone 2?", but rather, "What makes most sense in terms of ...


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You start at the beginning: Fate points represent those moments in the fiction when an Aspect of the story becomes prominent. If you're spending a Fate point on "My Father's Sword," it's because the fact that the sword was handed down to you is particularly relevant in this scene. As a result, spending them on the first three swings in combat might not have ...


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It sounds like your player is having trouble distinguishing between using a sword and getting extra oomph because it's a better sword than the average one. Item based advantages in any game are tricky because it's points that can simply be taken away if they're disarmed. Speaking of which, you might want to talk to him about reorganizing his character ...


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FATE's gameplay style is specifically and intentionally novelistic. The character does not gain or lose significant amounts of ability over the course of the story and while there is some variation in success the truly critical moments usually come down to previously established elements of the character's background. So, to some degree, yes, this is exactly ...


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My initial suggestion is to attack the problem from a different angle. You say that in the early part of the encounter/investigation/episode, the players will not invest resources or better yet, garner points by putting themselves in situations to fail. That essentially means that they find the decisions they're making in the beginning of these sessions ...


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Play a different system Or accept that this is the way the metanarrative goes in Fate. The system is intentionally designed to have the characteristics you are complaining about. Fate (and to a lesser extent FATE but we're talking about the former here) is a narratively focused game. Simulationism is theoretically sacrificed for the purpose of the ...



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