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-2

Fate 2.0 is hands down my group's favorite system. When Fate Core came out we immediately took it up with enthusiasm but ended up going back to 2.0 because of Fate Core's relative shortcomings. We now use it more or less exclusively for a homebrewed JSR (John's Scion Resources) inspired Scions remake. Here's why: Fate Core is Unmitigatedly Narrative Our ...


22

Fate characters are proactive, competent and dramatic It may seem like that's a given for just about any game: who wouldn't want competent, proactive, dramatic characters in their games? But some genres don't work that way. Horror is a notable example. Most horror games turn on characters feeling powerless, which is not what Fate does - horror in Fate ...


9

The main thing I think that would be hard to do in FATE is GM-designed-mystery-solving. Due to how it's expected that the GM shares with the players all the relevant information, including things the characters would not know (and then bribe them into their character not acting on that information with compulsions) it gets really hard for the GM to set up a ...


2

As @dopplegreener pointed out, there is no by-the-book cost for weapon ratings. That being said, it's pretty easy to extrapolate costs based on what you want it to do. Weapon Ratings For me, I always see weapon rating as equivalent to the add a bonus stunt. It's pretty much "gain a +2 bonus to [attack skill] when you successfully attack with [specific ...


9

Fate Core offers no by-the-book default values. You're free to work out the value on your own (or burdened with doing so). You can look to specific Fate implementations for guidance. You can simply treat them as having the same value to a +2. Strictly speaking they aren't — weapon:2 won't help you hit any more reliably — but it could be ...


2

(This started as a comment on BESW's answer, but I ran up against the character limit, so...) In addition to the combat balance considerations, I think there's a narrative/game design aspect to this question: With the current rule, Fate combat often involves several turns spent setting up beneficial aspects. DFRPG calls this 'maneuvering', Fate Core rolls ...


1

A compel should be severe enough for the compelling player to justify the fate point expenditure, and plausible enough for the compelled player so that they may consider accepting it. What that means depends so much on your story…


10

Stress is a pacing mechanic. It's a way to control how fast and intense your conflicts are. Messing with this changes the kind of stories Fate tells, by changing how seriously PCs take conflicts. Increasing the speed at which you can use stress boxes shifts the pace of conflict. Characters with multiple stress boxes become much less squishy against large ...


3

There is no set "rule" on how serious it should be. Being a narrative component to the game, the severity is also hand-wavy. The compel should be severe enough that your players stop to think about it, maybe even give the GM—or whoever is offering the compel—an eyebrow raise, but not so severe that they pay it off without thinking. It's an art, to be sure, ...


0

It's got to make the story better. That's the whole reason for passing the Fate Points around in the first place - to encourage more people to contribute to a better story.


6

Crafting Mundane Items We know from the description of the Crafts skill that making things is an overcome roll, not a create an advantage roll: Overcome: Crafts allows you to build, break, or fix machinery, presuming you have the time and tools you need. However, it's usually not need to roll to see if you can actually create the item. The basics ...


5

"I'm more effective, always, when the following is true" is the definition of a stunt. So a simple stunt like "Water Type: +2 when attacking fire types" or the equivalent is a pretty good starting point. Other options might be "Weapon: 2 against fire types" which would only give you the bonus once you've already hit, or increasing consequence severity ...


4

Remember that since anything can be treated as a character, give the campaign a stunt: Super Effective. whenever I attack or create an advantage against a target weak against my type, I get a +1 bonus.


2

One alternative might be to model "super-effective" attacks as a Stunt instead of an Aspect. Stunts are meant to be persistent advantages that apply to specific situations, such as "because I know Flamethrower, I get +2 to Attack against Grass-type opponents." However, modeling types as Aspects might still be good because Aspects are meant to be sometimes ...


4

No, there really aren't any existing rules that do what you're asking. My suggestion would be to simply state that a particular Pokemon type always has that +2 bonus in effect against another Pokemon it's strong/weak against. Types resistant to particular attacks get a +2 to defense and types whose attacks are particularly effective get +2 to attack. ...



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