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4

Because fiction. Realistically, it doesn't make sense that losing makes you more likely to win in the future. It doesn't make sense. But Fate couldn't care less about realism. It doesn't work on the rules of the real world. It works on the rules of fiction. And, in books, movies, and TV shows, there's a rhythm of highs and lows. You have a successful ...


0

The goal or intention of the character's action is the primary factor, modified by the circumstances of the setting. What is the character really attempting to achieve, and what modifying requirements are imposed by the situation and the environment? This is excellently elucidated by @BESW. But there is another modifying factor. Consider also the ...


20

What is your player trying to accomplish? Skills have trappings unique to themselves, and that's important: you can attack with Shoot but not with Athletics, barring a particular stunt or what-have-you. So before you choose your skill, determine what mechanical action the player's narrative act is best modelled by (attack, defend, create advantage, ...


3

If the goal is to "toss a heavy object to hurt an opponent", that seems like a pretty clear application of the Shoot skill to me. It governs all the ranged weapons. I wouldn't really use Athletics for it, at any rate. If you want to emphasise "these things are heavy" then it would be better to use Physique, as that represents muscle and general toughness. ...


7

You use whichever of those makes sense in the context of the narrative at your table. There is no hard and fast rule for that. However, it's important to remember the Golden Rule: Decide what you’re trying to accomplish first, then consult the rules to help you do it. Shoot is about precision and tactics. Athletics is about power and finesse. Fight is ...


1

It's not hard to make lethal Fate games. It doesn't even really take any system modifications. Use Tough Opponents If your opponents aren't a capable threat to the PCs, you won't see death. If their numbers don't stack up, it's unlikely that they'll pose a credible threat. So make enemies with high skills and good stunts. Give your unnamed NPCs fairly ...


0

The big question is, "is this true all of the time"? If so, no invoke is required. If you're a Princess of the Realm, you can get into the castle. The guards let you in. This is just a thing that happens. However, that doesn't mean that the peasants will necessarily do everything you say! However, being a Princess of the Realm definitely could weigh ...


6

Yes, it's fine for things in the fictional environment to give permission without being aspects. The door in the room gives permission to open it and pass through; the pen and paper on a table and the literacy of a character gives permission to write a letter; and a gun in hand gives permission to shoot—all of them without having to be aspects. That is part ...


12

Yes, GMs can spend Fate points without an NPC active in the scene. Fate points represent a game participant's agency to influence the scene, NOT the agency of the character that participant is playing. I feel free to spend Fate points to make things harder at dramatically appropriate times, because that's one of my jobs as the GM. This is what the Bronze ...


8

Special equipment doesn't sound like an Aspect to me. Aspects are supposed to be double-edged: you can invoke them for a bonus, or they can be invoked/compelled against you to put you at a disadvantage. Most items in Zelda games aren't built with particular weaknesses, though there are exceptions -- the Iron Boots make you slow, the Zora Tunic in Twilight ...


4

I would make either make them Stunts/Extras or, as suggested in the linked article, note them as "narrative flavor" and leave it at that. Specifically, the fact that you have the X thing allows you to do Y, and if you don't have X, you can't do Y, much like how you can't use your Shoot skill if you don't have a gun, even though "Has a gun" isn't an aspect.


1

The manner in which individual mooks' stress boxes add up in a mob differs between Core and Accelerated. In Core: When a mob takes a hit, shifts in excess of what’s needed to take out one NPC are applied to the next NPCs in the mob, one at a time. ... On Lenny’s turn, Landon deals two shifts to the mob he’s facing, enough to take out two thugs and ...


1

Stress is neither damage nor a representation of the numbers in a mob. It is an abstract measure of how much narrative effort you must put into getting your way with your opponent. In another perspective, it is similar to the numeric difficulty of defeating an opponent, only that you can work towards that instead of having to roll at once. You can defeat a ...


3

Fate Core If a recovery roll "fails" you may still succeed at a cost, since it's an overcome action. Recovering from a Consequence says that: The action in question is an overcome action; the obstacle is the consequence that you took. The overcome action states that: When you fail an overcome action, you have two options. You can simply fail, ...


-2

I've been trying a similar thing, and modes just didn't cut it. So I'm in the process of devising something combining the default skill pyramid upgrades for players, but simple (mode like) creation for new characters and NPCs. The system is intended to create a generic system applicable to a lot of genres / settings. Skills are intended to be abstract, with ...


4

Skill Modes to me are a nice balancing point between Fate Core's Skill system and Fate Accelerated Edition's Approach system, so I look at them as a mix of both. How to identify Skill Modes I look at this from the Approach point of view: if you had to create Approaches for your setting, what would they be? Those will most likely be very similar to your ...


14

NO You do not free up the more severe consequence slot just because you start to recover. There is a time to wait once recovery has begun that is part of what makes it a consequence. From the SRD (emphasis mine): If you succeed at the recovery action, or someone else succeeds on a recovery action for you, you get to rename the consequence aspect to ...


6

It's all explained here: Recovering from a consequence in Fate Core and Fate Accelerated To address your questions: In Core you need to roll and then wait an appropriate time. Then you get to clear mild consequences and rename moderate and severe ones. In Accelerated you would not need to roll - just explain how you recovered in a way that makes sense. If ...


3

There's a really simple alternative to penalties (at least for passive opposition) that I haven't seen mentioned yet: just set the difficulty higher. This is the recommended approach in the rules, and it is clearly a deliberate design decision to prefer this over penalties. Under the section "Running The Game" > "What To Do During Play" > "Setting ...


6

Fate has allowance and precedent for weakness, and primarily that comes in two forms I've seen. I'll get to how to pull them off, but they're these: Creatively leave a blank in your character's capabilities, and design around it deliberately. This goes beyond simply not putting a point somewhere, and can be quite fun to work with and design. Create ...


6

This can just be modelled with an Aspect Remember that Aspects are always true. If your guy has the Aspect I can't read, then you effectively already have a stunt that blocks out a part of the available actions (ie; you can't read) And whenever reading could reasonably help you do something faster (such as having to read road signs to get to a place before ...


3

There aren't any "negative stunts"... No, Fate Core and FAE do not offer "anti-stunts" in the sense of "persistent, clearly-defined [negative] mechanical effects". I can think of at least two reasons for this: Characters in Fate are meant to be "proactive, capable people leading dramatic lives." (FC 2) Generally Fate is more about narrative-based effects ...



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