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1

I point you to the Golden Rule of Fate: Decide what you’re trying to accomplish first, then consult the rules to help you do it. What would it look like in-fiction? Is it a preemptive strike, designed to cause confusion right before the battle? That's creating an advantage. Do you want it to be an attack that does stress? Then treat it as an attack. ...


5

You use The Bronze Rule, AKA the Fate Fractal, and treat those environmental factors/Aspects as characters, allowing them to make an attack (emphasis mine): In Fate, you can treat anything in the game world like it’s a character. Anything can have aspects, skills, stunts, stress tracks, and consequences if you need it to. This is called this the ...


4

Simple: The PC rolls an attack action when the device activates. The planting is just a story detail that justifies an attack by an absent PC. Of course it is a good idea to create an advantage when planting, so that it can be invoked during the attack, or compelled to complicate matters.


6

All play does happen in scenes, intentional or not. According to Fate Core A scene is a unit of game time…during which the players try to achieve a goal or otherwise accomplish something significant…[o]nce the action shifts to a new goal, moves to a new place related to that goal, or jumps in time, you’re in the next scene. —Defining Scenes Even ...


7

It's situationally dependent, really. Keep in mind the golden rule of Fate: Decide what you’re trying to accomplish first, then consult the rules to help you do it. – The Golden Rule If you're only trying to remove the aspect, it's an overcome roll. If you want to "overwrite" the aspect, then by all means roll to create an advantage. But I would ...


6

The SRD only deals in directly removing aspects, rule wise. Removing a situational Aspect requires an Overcome roll, most of the time. From the Fate SRD: If you want to get rid of a situation aspect, you can do it in one of two ways: roll an overcome action specifically for the purpose of getting rid of the aspect, or roll some other kind of action ...


7

You can, in fact, do either. Per the Fate SRD: If you want to get rid of a situation aspect, you can do it in one of two ways: roll an overcome action specifically for the purpose of getting rid of the aspect, or roll some other kind of action that would make the aspect make no sense if you succeed. (For example, if you’re Grappled, you could try ...


8

Every time an aspect introduces a meaningful complication into your character's life, you should probably get a Fate point for it; who suggested the complication is largely irrelevant. Self compels are almost identical to regular compels! You suggest a way your character's life gets more complicated or dramatic because of an aspect in play; the suggestion ...


3

In this relevant forum thread, Fred Hicks from Evil Hat comments: Free invokes arise from situations. They last as long as the anchoring situation does. From the rules on situation aspects (emphasis mine): A situation aspect is temporary, intended to last only for a single scene or until it no longer makes sense (but no longer than a session, at ...


2

Yes, you're over-complicating it. There's no real hard-and-fast rule about exactly how long an action takes in Fate (or what it involves), so there's nothing to stop you from saying that you spend your turn studying your opponent, then shout "I know that fighting style!" as part of that same action to all of your buddies because talking is a free action. ...


20

Fiction First Hi Marc. You are running into one of the differences between rules-first systems and fiction-first systems. Fiction-first means that the rules serve the story unfolding between the players: When something happens in the story that matches a trigger condition in the rules, the mechanics engage and the results feed back into the story. Outside ...



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