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5

The GM and Fate Points: GMs, you also get to use fate points, but the rules are a little bit different than the rules for players. When you award players fate points for compels or concession, they come out of an unlimited pool you have for doing so—you don’t have to worry about running out of fate points to award, and you always get to ...


8

No, compels do not cost the GM anything. From the Fate-SRD Finally, and this is very important: if a player wants to compel another character, it costs a fate point to propose the complication. The GM can always compel for free, and any player can propose a compel on his or her own character for free.


5

In practice, you don't normally have to compel your own aspects. You're free to suggest at any time that an aspect of yours could be compelled — by someone else, that is. If in response to your suggestion the GM or the group nod or say "yeah, great idea" or similar, then someone else will usually follow up their agreement by doing the compelling and giving ...


1

As you stated, good Aspects have both positive and negative implications. If you see an opportunity for the negative implications of your aspects to come into play, use those to get your Fate pool going. You suggest the compel, the GM says whether it's valid, and you get the Fate point. I had players with the following Aspects, and the negative uses ...


2

The severity of a compel depends on your game group. Compelling is a trade and if you find your players always paying to avoid your compels (or each other's) then the severity is too high. A timid group of players new to role-playing might not want surprises in the same way a group of seasoned and gonzo players might take any compel you give them just for ...


16

You start with a pithy campaign concept pitch ("Con artists in a Star Wars 'verse"). Then the players make trimmed-down PCs: a High Concept, a Trouble, and two or three skills with ranks assigned. Everything else can be filled in on the fly during play as it's needed/wanted. As they make their characters, the players should decide what small goal they share ...


10

Aspects are narrative permission, but that doesn't mean that they are mechanical permission. He can narratively make that shield—but mechanically that's Create An Advantage. If Create An Advantage is insufficient, then he needs to pay for a new Stunt that lets him use Will for physical defence.


9

Yes He managed to get two successes with style, even though he has split his result in half. That's an amazing display of overpowering combat prowess and he deserves to get those boosts! But... When you succeed with style on an attack, it works like a normal success, but you also have the option to reduce the value of your hit by one to gain a boost as ...


3

What better Fate mechanic to model a narrative twist like that than the often overlooked compel? If Anne's player has any Fate points remaining, she can try to find an appropriate aspect on Anne, the villain or the environment and offer a compel to the GM. The GM as usual, can accept or refuse. You may think that being taken out means Anne cannot do ...


-2

I think your solution falls more or less in the "spend a Fate point to introduce a fact" mechanic. After that you could treat the character like if he/she had one free stress box so if the enemy succesfully hits him/her is taken out again (this time, though, the character wouldn't be able to come back).


9

The Taken Out rule and what it does is one of the most important rules in Fate I think, and I would not go about changing it. That is unfair to the players and the GM as it means you can no longer mechnically rely on anything actually removing another actor from a combat, if they can come up with a good enough reason to be back. (It can also be easily gamed ...


3

Rather than actually being taken out, Anne's player should have used Create an Advantage to have Anne appear to be taken out, presumably placing an appropriate situation aspect like "Anne appears to be taken out" or an aspect on the Villain like "Overconfident" or "Unaware Anne's grabbed onto the railing" or somesuch, narrating her as having been hit off the ...


3

That's what fate points are for - for dramatic twists of fate. The hero catches their breath, grits their teeth, goes on the offensive... and spends a bunch of fate points. But you're after something greater, it would seem. First things first. The only way to take someone out is to either fill up all of their stress boxes and consequence slots, or for them ...



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