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94

Buy some. The best "replacement" for not having Fudge dice is to buy some! Grey Ghost Press (maker of Fudge) sells a tube of four Fudge dice for about 5 bucks, or a bag of twenty Fudge dice for about 15 bucks, but a lot of places are sold out. However, Indie Press Revolution just started carrying Fudge Dice (four or twenty) to support the FATE-based games ...


34

Yes. The books never explicitly say that the GM should or must tell the players the difficulty, but that's because it takes it for granted. (It really should say, because – as you point out – keeping players in the dark is just so normal for so many GMs.) There is circumstantial evidence in the text that the GM is supposed to set difficulties "in the ...


28

See DFRPG: p.200 for Attacks p.207 for Maneuvers Whenever you attack someone, you choose the appropriate Skill to roll - Fists for punches, Weapons for knives/swords, Guns for guns, etc.. Roll 4dF (the 4 Fudge dice) and add the result of the roll, which will be between -4 and +4 to the Skill you chose. The defender gets to make a defense roll with an ...


24

If you're going to be on a hike or road trip, take the clubs out of a deck of cards. Spades point up. Hearts point down. Diamonds don't point anywhere really. Deal four, shuffle them back in. Iterate.


24

Write out a starter set of "power cards" on index cards, formatted somewhat like the D&D 4e power cards for familiarity. They can have some normal FATE combat options, and also some tailored to her Aspects - you can make these up yourself, or based on things you've heard her say she'd think her character could do. After each combat, tell he she ...


24

Fate has a much more narrative approach, less GM authority, and player-based plot control mechanisms. This can make for trouble transitioning from a more adversarial GMing environment. Fate Core (and other recent Fate games such as Dresden) actually do a pretty good job of providing a suggested "menu" of powers and stunts for players to take; show them to ...


23

Yes, each player has the right to refuse a compel. But you already knew that, really. It's not really a "group compel" at all. Since every player in the group has the aspect, you're making multiple individual event compels. The issue is wrapping our heads around what that means for the narrative. This is actually kinda cool. Refusing an event compel ...


22

I would say this is bad practice. You've just had the players roll alertness when they should be rolling empathy. Say one of your characters has Empathy as a Superb skill. They get a huge bonus on the roll. Say they also have only an Average Alertness. You've just denied them a +4 on that roll and they don't even know it! (If they find out they will be ...


22

To me it sounds like your player is a mix of being impulsive and a newbie to roleplaying. The newbie elements (needing stuff explicitly explained and such) should work themselves out with time. The impulsiveness usually needs a little bit of work. Here's what I did once to rebuff the impulsive players in my campaign: Set up a wonderful campaign arc that ...


22

Yes, a character can choose to be taken out. Your stress and consequences are buffers against you being taken out. If any points of harm from an attack do not get absorbed by one of those two (or an equivalent), you're taken out. If you get hit by an attack, one of two things happen: either you absorb the hit and stay in the fight, or you’re taken out. ...


21

I was in exactly the same boat as you a year ago: introduced to Fate with Diaspora, loved it, and then wanted to capture than in a fantasy setting. This is where I went with it: Dresden Files RPG has a comprehensive, flavourful, flexible, and very Fate-like magic system that easily translates to a fantasy setting. For an incredibly-good explanation of its ...


21

First off, DFRPG is full of "the group should agree" (YS92), "keep in mind the intended play style" (YS31), "make sure your players are okay this" (YS338), "make sure you're on the same page as your players" (341), and "when in doubt, talk it through with your group" (YS99). In many places throughout this book, the phrase “the GM decides” is often used ...


20

The specifics are going to depend on your implementation of Fate, but in Standard Fate (and Fate Core), when you Create an Advantage (or create a temporary aspect), you get a free invocation. I'm going to quote the rule from Fate Core: Free invocations work like normal ones except in two ways: no fate points are exchanged, and you can stack them with ...


20

Consider it a self-compel Although concession does give you greater control over your fate, you're still losing--and you're choosing to lose when you still have a chance of winning. you can interrupt any action at any time before the roll is made to declare that you concede the conflict. (Fate Core 167) That means if the dice are rolled and you're ...


20

So far, we have two answers, which appear to contradict each other. I tend to think in practice they're not that far apart from each other, tho. When you're taken out, you cede control over your fate to the attacker. That means the attacker can assert all sorts of things about what happens to you. Like: you're dead. And because total destruction of the ...


18

This article shows you how to make plain d6s with pips into Fudge dice with a Sharpie.


18

OGL for d20 Only? The OGL, or Open Game License, was originated by Wizards of the Coast in the year 2000 to use for the D&D rules. But since then, other people have used the same license to openly license other systems. It's like the MIT or Apache or GPL software licenses; anyone can use them, they are not "owned" by the parent company in any ...


17

Ask her for her character's intentions. Then guide her through the game system towards the result she strives for. The FATE system is quite different than many other RPG engines, and the great amount of creative licence granted to players can be overwhelming for newcomers used to other game systems. Some hand holding may be necessary until they get used to ...


17

Yes, why not! All Fate games are storytelling games, so all that you can or cannot do depends on whether you can form a coherent story around it that is consistent with what has come before. If you can form a plausible story around shaming a hitman enough to stop trying to kill you, I'd say you can do it. The hard part is getting there in the first place. ...


17

1) FATE is built on top of the old FUDGE system, which still shows in the die mechanisms. FATE 2.0 was close to those origins and therefore acknowledges them. (FATE 1.0 was never a full published game, just an early internal set of designs.) 2) Spirit of the Century was originally a standalone game set in a pulp-like world. This was the development of ...


16

Wraith's answer is absolutely right: Fate is designed to be open and transparent, and revealing aspects is crucial to the players' mechanical viability in the narrative. Now, DFRPG itself occupies a rather peculiar niche in the Fate paradigm and its narrative style unfortunately led to a lot of engine philosophy being implied rather than stated. So I'm ...


16

It helps to first tell them that in a FATE game, the players are not their characters. Players are not much different than the GM in what they do, only that they usually have a limited jurisdiction (their character) and limited resources (their FATE points). Everybody at the table has control over how the story unfolds regarding their jurisdiction, and can ...


16

FATE doesn't go for fiddly bits FATE, as I'm sure you've noticed, has narrative expendiency as its core philosopy. One result of this is that mechanics are pretty simple and don't have a lot of exceptions or fiddly bits hanging off. So when the book describes one Court as stronger than another, that's primarily a narrative distinction, not something that ...


16

A lot depends on the implementation of Fate/the type of aspect it is, and the story that is being told in the creation of the character. Type of Aspect In some uses of Fate, all aspects are the same- no aspect is more important to the creation of the character than the other. In others, there is a High Concept or some aspect that to a large extent defines ...


16

You do appear to be missing some stuff here. Here's how I'd handle your situation. (As a foreword: bear in mind your players and the player characters being unaware of an aspect are two very different things, so you should make sure you distinguish between them.) Entering the Scene You said you entered a Forest with a River in it. Both of these are ...


16

I run away and hide. "Where do you run away to? How do you hide?" I steal the wrench from him. "Just run up and snatch it?" If the above seems like too much effort, you probably shouldn't be GMing. Players often blurt out the gist of their actions and need a little prodding or time to get them to fully describe what they want to do. Give them a ...


15

Fudge dice have (as best as I can remember) two pluses, two minuses, and two blanks, right? Why not just use a normal d6 and make, say, 1-2 "plus," 3-4 "minus," and 5-6 "blank?"


15

There are at least 4 ways to use FATE aspects: Tag opponent for bonus to self - you pay 1 Fate get tagged by opponent for penalty to self - You get 1 fate get compelled by opponent to force a move or prevent a move or attack- you get 1 fate if you accept, pay 1 if not get tagged by opponent to who narrates the outcome - You get 1 fate if you accept. To ...


15

Fate points represent your ability as a player to manipulate the fate of the story. Aspects on your character(or elsewhere) just provide the pretext. In FATE games, you do not simulate a world. You simulate a story and your skills represent what kinds of stories your character usually gets involved in. With fate points, you as the player get the power to ...


15

Stress tracks in FATE work as a pacing mechanism. It's not meant to simulate the physiological reaction of a body to punishment; it's there to provide a means of determining whether a character is out of the fight or not and reproduce a narrative aesthetic. Hit points historically have worked this way; the description of what a "hit point" is has often ...



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