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108

Buy some. The best "replacement" for not having Fudge dice is to buy some! Grey Ghost Press (maker of Fudge) sells a tube of four Fudge dice for about 5 bucks, or a bag of twenty Fudge dice for about 15 bucks, but a lot of places are sold out. However, Indie Press Revolution just started carrying Fudge Dice (four or twenty) to support the FATE-based games ...


45

Fate has a much more narrative approach, less GM authority, and player-based plot control mechanisms. This can make for trouble transitioning from a more adversarial GMing environment. Fate Core (and other recent Fate games such as Dresden) actually do a pretty good job of providing a suggested "menu" of powers and stunts for players to take; show them to ...


41

Here are pitfalls that I would watch out for: Confusing Stress with Hit Points - Stress is not hit points. Stress is not damage. Stress is a measure of your ability to avoid lasting consequences from conflicts. Don't get hung up on the false equivalence of Stress and "damage". Looking to the mechanics to drive the fiction - In Fate, the fiction drives, and ...


40

Yes. The books never explicitly say that the GM should or must tell the players the difficulty, but that's because it takes it for granted. (It really should say, because – as you point out – keeping players in the dark is just so normal for so many GMs.) There is circumstantial evidence in the text that the GM is supposed to set difficulties "in the open",...


36

Consider it a self-compel Although concession does give you greater control over your fate, you're still losing--and you're choosing to lose when you still have a chance of winning. you can interrupt any action at any time before the roll is made to declare that you concede the conflict. (Fate Core 167) That means if the dice are rolled and you're ...


32

See DFRPG: p.200 for Attacks p.207 for Maneuvers Whenever you attack someone, you choose the appropriate Skill to roll - Fists for punches, Weapons for knives/swords, Guns for guns, etc.. Roll 4dF (the 4 Fudge dice) and add the result of the roll, which will be between -4 and +4 to the Skill you chose. The defender gets to make a defense roll with an ...


31

First off, DFRPG is full of "the group should agree" (YS92), "keep in mind the intended play style" (YS31), "make sure your players are okay this" (YS338), "make sure you're on the same page as your players" (341), and "when in doubt, talk it through with your group" (YS99). In many places throughout this book, the phrase “the GM decides” is often used ...


29

Write out a starter set of "power cards" on index cards, formatted somewhat like the D&D 4e power cards for familiarity. They can have some normal FATE combat options, and also some tailored to her Aspects - you can make these up yourself, or based on things you've heard her say she'd think her character could do. After each combat, tell he she "...


29

Players working together like this is normal and expected. It's all fine as long as the player with the present PC is not bothered by the input from the other players and has the final say. Fate Core, page 4 Both players and gamemasters also have a secondary job: make everyone around you look awesome. Fate is best as a collaborative endeavor, with ...


27

If you're going to be on a hike or road trip, take the clubs out of a deck of cards. Spades point up. Hearts point down. Diamonds don't point anywhere really. Deal four, shuffle them back in. Iterate.


27

The specifics are going to depend on your implementation of Fate, but in Standard Fate (and Fate Core), when you Create an Advantage (or create a temporary aspect), you get a free invocation. I'm going to quote the rule from Fate Core: Free invocations work like normal ones except in two ways: no fate points are exchanged, and you can stack them with ...


27

Yes, each player has the right to refuse a compel. But you already knew that, really. It's not a "group compel" at all, there's no such thing. Since every player in the group has the aspect, you're making multiple individual event compels. The issue is wrapping our heads around what that means for the narrative, which turns out to be kinda cool. Refusing ...


26

I would say this is bad practice. You've just had the players roll alertness when they should be rolling empathy. Say one of your characters has Empathy as a Superb skill. They get a huge bonus on the roll. Say they also have only an Average Alertness. You've just denied them a +4 on that roll and they don't even know it! (If they find out they will be ...


26

Brute forcing is going to be solved by application of two principles. Neither of them are totally rules-oriented. The rules aren't interested in stopping brute-forcing, because sometimes it's fun: you're in a contest, you need to get through that door before someone finds you, and it might be fun to just kick it in several times until it smashes into ...


25

Fate points represent your ability as a player to manipulate the fate of the story. Aspects on your character(or elsewhere) just provide the pretext. In FATE games, you do not simulate a world. You simulate a story and your skills represent what kinds of stories your character usually gets involved in. With fate points, you as the player get the power to ...


24

To me it sounds like your player is a mix of being impulsive and a newbie to roleplaying. The newbie elements (needing stuff explicitly explained and such) should work themselves out with time. The impulsiveness usually needs a little bit of work. Here's what I did once to rebuff the impulsive players in my campaign: Set up a wonderful campaign arc that ...


24

I was in exactly the same boat as you a year ago: introduced to Fate with Diaspora, loved it, and then wanted to capture than in a fantasy setting. This is where I went with it: Dresden Files RPG has a comprehensive, flavourful, flexible, and very Fate-like magic system that easily translates to a fantasy setting. For an incredibly-good explanation of its ...


24

Yes, you can be damaged and Taken Out on any stress track A conflict in FATE is about opposing desires. While two or more desires are opposed and unfulfilled a conflict will continue. When the desires change so they are no longer opposed or one is fulfilled the conflict ends. Take the example of Hitman and Target in an open fight in a bar. Hitman's goal ...


24

It becomes part of the character when it's more important than the other aspects that they have. Something as ephemeral as the Create Advantage action probably won't change a character in such a fundamental way, and (probably) neither will getting an item. Hmm. Example time: We've got a character with a couple of aspects: "Always stand up against bullies"...


24

Summary: Negative aspects are easy "push button here" dispensers for Fate points, but spamming that button needlessly is boring at best. Two things need to be kept in mind: drama, and the Fate point economy. Being stymied or drained of Fate points by the same problem over and over isn't dramatic or interesting, so don't do it. But the Fate points must flow! ...


24

There's a distinct demarcation in games between the Player and the Character. And in most games when such things come up, it's relegating the player to the same position as the character- and trying to force the player to solve problems is if he is the character. There is nothing wrong with that approach, in any game. And there's also nothing wrong with ...


23

So far, we have two answers, which appear to contradict each other. I tend to think in practice they're not that far apart from each other, tho. When you're taken out, you cede control over your fate to the attacker. That means the attacker can assert all sorts of things about what happens to you. Like: you're dead. And because total destruction of the ...


22

You do appear to be missing some stuff here. Here's how I'd handle your situation. (As a foreword: bear in mind your players and the player characters being unaware of an aspect are two very different things, so you should make sure you distinguish between them.) Entering the Scene You said you entered a Forest with a River in it. The forest itself is ...


22

Yes, a character can choose to be taken out. Your stress and consequences are buffers against you being taken out. If any points of harm from an attack do not get absorbed by one of those two (or an equivalent), you're taken out. If you get hit by an attack, one of two things happen: either you absorb the hit and stay in the fight, or you’re taken out. ...


22

Scenes don't need dice. In fact, having scenes without dice is one indicator your group may be awesome. There are two basic reasons to use a mechanic in Fate: things aren't interesting, or you don't want to choose between two interesting things. Fate's mechanics are designed to make the story exciting: it's up to the group to decide what that means. If ...


21

Now there are two sides to that coin. The good part is that Fate is an awesome system when it comes to player-vs-player games. Sometimes the narrative leads to a situation when two player characters find themselves in the opposite sides of the fence. The typical fate mechanisms like invoking and compelling, coupled with the fate point economy, lends itself ...


21

This is going to take some deconstructing, because you're mixing up concepts that do exist with concepts that don't. Default difficulty: doesn't exist. Let's get something important straightened out: Fate doesn't have a 'default' difficulty. It's noteworthy those Core and Accelerated passages you're quoting from never use the word 'default' anywhere. That ...


21

My initial suggestion is to attack the problem from a different angle. You say that in the early part of the encounter/investigation/episode, the players will not invest resources or better yet, garner points by putting themselves in situations to fail. That essentially means that they find the decisions they're making in the beginning of these sessions ...


21

Gomad has a great list already. Here's a few more I've thought of. The first one, especially, is something I've both experienced, and heard of others experiencing: Understanding how aspects differ from traditional bonuses - Aspects may be "always true," but that doesn't mean they provide a constant mechanical effect, the way that a "+2 sword" might. They ...


21

Economies of scale. From Fred Hicks of Evil Hat, publishers of FAE: We printed like 13,000 copies of those. Because we hit that economy of scale, our actual cost (not counting up front costs of writing — minimal — and art — reasonable) came in at less than 40 cents per copy (close to 35). To make a MSRP $5, 40-page book work for distribution our costs ...



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