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4

Because fiction. Realistically, it doesn't make sense that losing makes you more likely to win in the future. It doesn't make sense. But Fate couldn't care less about realism. It doesn't work on the rules of the real world. It works on the rules of fiction. And, in books, movies, and TV shows, there's a rhythm of highs and lows. You have a successful ...


1

It's not hard to make lethal Fate games. It doesn't even really take any system modifications. Use Tough Opponents If your opponents aren't a capable threat to the PCs, you won't see death. If their numbers don't stack up, it's unlikely that they'll pose a credible threat. So make enemies with high skills and good stunts. Give your unnamed NPCs fairly ...


0

The big question is, "is this true all of the time"? If so, no invoke is required. If you're a Princess of the Realm, you can get into the castle. The guards let you in. This is just a thing that happens. However, that doesn't mean that the peasants will necessarily do everything you say! However, being a Princess of the Realm definitely could weigh ...


4

No, not all facts are aspects. Aspects are narratively relevant facts. Making something an aspect is pointing it out, and saying that it's important. It's like a camera taking a shot to linger on the patch of ice on a rooftop - as soon as you see that, you know someone's slipping on it. There's a sort of information economy in Fate, and things that are ...


3

All aspects are facts but not all facts are aspects. One way to differentiate an aspect from a mundane fact could be that aspects are prominent facts for the context they are attached to. They say a lot about what you want to emphasize in your game. Character aspects highlight what's important for your character's story Scene aspects define what that scene ...


3

A create advantage action does just that. It creates advantages. It does not defeat opponents. There's the attack action for the latter. So if the action is successful and the advantage is created, it is supposed to be something that makes life harder for the target but not something that renders them unable to continue. A complete paralysis like the one ...


4

Going through the Fate learning curve coming from more traditional things, there's a few things that really had to sink in. I think I've been pretty successful at helping others get through it, so here's the top things that I've learned. Fiction First This is the biggest thing. By fiction I don't mean "the GM's pre-planned story." I mean the stuff we ...


4

I generally agree that somebody being completely stunned feels like a Taken Out result rather than a Create Advantage - after all, someone completely paralyzed is pretty much out of the conflict, right? If you think of most movies, TV shows, or books, the "paralyzing attack" is generally something that occurs at the end of the fight, not the beginning. ...


11

There's a couple ways you can handle this. Mix and match as you like; each probably works fine on its own or in conjunction with others. Use existing mechanics to make stunning more significant. So your character can impose a condition on someone that significantly debilitates them? We've got a mechanic for that, it's called a "consequence." Perhaps you'd ...


12

Yes, GMs can spend Fate points without an NPC active in the scene. Fate points represent a game participant's agency to influence the scene, NOT the agency of the character that participant is playing. I feel free to spend Fate points to make things harder at dramatically appropriate times, because that's one of my jobs as the GM. This is what the Bronze ...


20

Scenes don't need dice. In fact, having scenes without dice is one indicator your group may be awesome. There are two basic reasons to use a mechanic in Fate: things aren't interesting, or you don't want to choose between two interesting things. Fate's mechanics are designed to make the story exciting: it's up to the group to decide what that means. If ...


3

Skype allows multiple streams; I use it to tutor my brother, who lives far from me, and he shares both his screen (so I can see what he's working on) and his webcam (so I can see his face). Recently, they added multiple video chat, but I've never used it with the screen-sharing function so I'm not 100% sure it will allow both multiple recipients and two ...


0

A simple DIY solution might be to just stream your desktop, but also run a program that displays your webcam in a window on your desktop. Then you can toggle between windows as needed, or possibly even find a way to pin the webcam view on top of the other windows. Edit: I don't know what OS you're using, and you can Google as easily as I can, but a quick ...


1

The manner in which individual mooks' stress boxes add up in a mob differs between Core and Accelerated. In Core: When a mob takes a hit, shifts in excess of what’s needed to take out one NPC are applied to the next NPCs in the mob, one at a time. ... On Lenny’s turn, Landon deals two shifts to the mob he’s facing, enough to take out two thugs and ...


1

You can also look at zoom (zoom.com) but it does cost a little money. It works fairly nicely as I use it for business. Although I rarely use the chat typing functionality and opt for the microphone. It does have one however.


1

Stress is neither damage nor a representation of the numbers in a mob. It is an abstract measure of how much narrative effort you must put into getting your way with your opponent. In another perspective, it is similar to the numeric difficulty of defeating an opponent, only that you can work towards that instead of having to roll at once. You can defeat a ...


8

Google hangouts. Invite yourself twice, mute one instance. When I've presented at conferences, remotely, I've driven two instances of google hangouts in exactly this way. So long as you've got one of the instances' audio completely cut out (I recommend the screenshare), and enough bandwidth to push both, you're just fine. You have to use multiple google ...


3

Fate Core If a recovery roll "fails" you may still succeed at a cost, since it's an overcome action. Recovering from a Consequence says that: The action in question is an overcome action; the obstacle is the consequence that you took. The overcome action states that: When you fail an overcome action, you have two options. You can simply fail, ...


-2

I've been trying a similar thing, and modes just didn't cut it. So I'm in the process of devising something combining the default skill pyramid upgrades for players, but simple (mode like) creation for new characters and NPCs. The system is intended to create a generic system applicable to a lot of genres / settings. Skills are intended to be abstract, with ...


4

Skill Modes to me are a nice balancing point between Fate Core's Skill system and Fate Accelerated Edition's Approach system, so I look at them as a mix of both. How to identify Skill Modes I look at this from the Approach point of view: if you had to create Approaches for your setting, what would they be? Those will most likely be very similar to your ...


6

It's all explained here: Recovering from a consequence in Fate Core and Fate Accelerated To address your questions: In Core you need to roll and then wait an appropriate time. Then you get to clear mild consequences and rename moderate and severe ones. In Accelerated you would not need to roll - just explain how you recovered in a way that makes sense. If ...


2

These are the key points to look for when you make the transition from D&D to fate, in my experience (D&D player, Fate GM and player): Always make failure interesting You shouldn't simply fail in what you are attempting (picklocking, observing, investigating, bartering, etc...) but you should, when possible, have a success with a cost. As an ...


5

I have observed players coming from "crunchy" systems (d20, TriStat) fall into these mental traps. Assuming that most contests will be combat or d20-like skill or saving checks. In Fate, a contest could just as easily be a chess game, a stare-down, a debate, or even fashion choices. And the outcomes of those contests can radically alter the course of ...


8

Transitioning from a D&D-style system to Fate can be tricky due to three major considerations: story creation versus consumption, the dice effect, and non-binary results. What I mean by Creation versus Consumption is that most D&D-style games have a specific GM role who is responsible almost exclusively for Content and Story Creation, while the ...


20

Gomad has a great list already. Here's a few more I've thought of. The first one, especially, is something I've both experienced, and heard of others experiencing: Understanding how aspects differ from traditional bonuses - Aspects may be "always true," but that doesn't mean they provide a constant mechanical effect, the way that a "+2 sword" might. They ...


38

Here are pitfalls that I would watch out for: Confusing Stress with Hit Points - Stress is not hit points. Stress is not damage. Stress is a measure of your ability to avoid lasting consequences from conflicts. Don't get hung up on the false equivalence of Stress and "damage". Looking to the mechanics to drive the fiction - In Fate, the fiction drives, and ...



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