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4

There's a huge Chekov's elephant gun you need to be aware of when playing a mystery game: The mystery is there to be solved! There's nothing interesting about not solving the mystery. So since the players are going to solve the mystery anyway, the big question in the game shouldn't be about -if they can-. They can and will. It should be about -how they do- ...


1

I think a big one that's not explicitly called out in the rule book and hasn't been mentioned in the existing answers is intra-party conflict. That is, you should work out in advance with your players the extent to which their PCs should work at cross-purposes, and how they should deal with it. Some games, the PCs are all in it together and will always help ...


2

As @dopplegreener pointed out, there is no by-the-book cost for weapon ratings. That being said, it's pretty easy to extrapolate costs based on what you want it to do. Weapon Ratings For me, I always see weapon rating as equivalent to the add a bonus stunt. It's pretty much "gain a +2 bonus to [attack skill] when you successfully attack with [specific ...


9

Fate Core offers no by-the-book default values. You're free to work out the value on your own (or burdened with doing so). You can look to specific Fate implementations for guidance. You can simply treat them as having the same value to a +2. Strictly speaking they aren't — weapon:2 won't help you hit any more reliably — but it could be ...


0

You only charge fate-points for aspect usage in the exclusively narratively focused editions of Fate (like Fate Core). In Fate 2.0, the aspect denotes a core character trait, and thus is something that is always part of the character. Indeed, if the GM ever concocts a situation wherein he strips the character of the use of an aspect (perhaps in this case ...


2

(This started as a comment on BESW's answer, but I ran up against the character limit, so...) In addition to the combat balance considerations, I think there's a narrative/game design aspect to this question: With the current rule, Fate combat often involves several turns spent setting up beneficial aspects. DFRPG calls this 'maneuvering', Fate Core rolls ...


1

A compel should be severe enough for the compelling player to justify the fate point expenditure, and plausible enough for the compelled player so that they may consider accepting it. What that means depends so much on your story…


10

Stress is a pacing mechanic. It's a way to control how fast and intense your conflicts are. Messing with this changes the kind of stories Fate tells, by changing how seriously PCs take conflicts. Increasing the speed at which you can use stress boxes shifts the pace of conflict. Characters with multiple stress boxes become much less squishy against large ...


3

There is no set "rule" on how serious it should be. Being a narrative component to the game, the severity is also hand-wavy. The compel should be severe enough that your players stop to think about it, maybe even give the GM—or whoever is offering the compel—an eyebrow raise, but not so severe that they pay it off without thinking. It's an art, to be sure, ...


0

It's got to make the story better. That's the whole reason for passing the Fate Points around in the first place - to encourage more people to contribute to a better story.


1

Fate (any edition) is not built to handle nitty-gritty details. You can, of course, add and respect those details, but Fate won't help you much there. What it excels at is abstracting those details to the "story pressure" level. Fate does not tell you how many cans of sardines you have left. It tells you if food is becoming a problem, and lets you tell why. ...


0

This sounds like it would be heavily overpowered, but it doesn't have to be- ignoring pain is not the same as ignoring injury. If anything it can play in the opposite direction as pain works partly as a warning that there is a physical problem going on so a character with this ability may miss a serious problem that affects them badly later. If I can ignore ...


4

My suggestion is that the character take a stunt related to manipulating consequences, rather than stress. Stress is ephemeral - it vanishes after the combat is over, and unless you're in the middle of a combat, taking stress is basically meaningless, which means that 'delaying' stress doesn't really work. Consequences, on the other hand, represent the ...


1

Fate Option I would recommend you look at the Fate Core version of The Day After Ragnarok. It is a post-apocalyptic world with rules for single-use and signature equipment as well as vehicles. Basically, a single stunt slot can buy a single-use equipment item which is good (as the name suggests) for just a single use per session and needs some significant ...


3

Once the game actually starts, FATE doesn't really have to handle this very differently than other games do. You buy stuff with in-game currency at whatever price the GM decides is reasonable (and you can certainly port equipment price lists from pretty much any source if there's one you like). However, the FATE 2.0 chassis allows for real integration with ...


-2

I don't mean to be one of those "Aspects solve everything" kinds of people, but I think an aspect named Disarmed would be fine on a sharpshooter losing a gun, or a better plane..aspect... Honestly things like that are less about a numerical increase in how well you can do things and more of a... binary ability or inability to do things. (Sure, all planes ...


5

Do Not Pre-Make a Character Assuming you are running Fate Core, FAE, Diaspora, Dresden Files, Spirit of the Century, or any Fate variant that I know of, you should not do this. You are depriving Z, the other players, and your game of the spontaneous, synthetic, synergistic effects of creating characters in conjunction with one another. In Fate, character ...



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