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4

I know I'm a bit late to the party, but there one one detail I didn't think got mentioned enough (Flexibility). So... Pure mortals have three advantages they can choose from: Flexibility: By using stunts to stack relevant trappings onto a single skill, they can effectively increase their skills enormously. A simple example might be transplanting the ...


2

The parallel I've drawn to the stress track for d20 games is it's fairly similar to spell slots for a Wizard- or Cleric-type character: For example, a wizard has a certain number of zeroth-, first-, and second-level spell slots. They may use a second-level slot to memorize a first-level spell, but cannot use a first-level slot and a second-level slot to ...


13

Mortals do lose out in combat against the supernatural, but they gain majorly in other aspects, and are excellent to have for storytelling purposes. We've had a two-year campaign running, starting from a relatively low level and currently at Chest Deep. We have honestly found that there's advantages and disadvantages to both mortal and supernatural ...


2

Depends on the game, but usually when someone is talking about "high power", they are referring to physical combat power. On that scale, it's harder for mere mortals to measure up. The most concrete example of this is to look at wizards. An attack spell from any kind of evocation spell has two components that scale upwards - power of the attack, and ...


2

Just to chime in with a more general principle of Fate: Fiction First. If someone is stacking up advantages, they are doing stuff, taking time and effort and having knock-on effects in your world. If they are massing an army of minions, creating informants or trashing reputations, that should be visible and possibly attract hostile attention: "One time is ...



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