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9

The Fate Freeport Companion is a modern mechanical update for a setting from 2003; the Fate SRD is the newest version of the Fate engine, released in 2013. You will find discrepancies in the implementation of each system's ethos. Additionally: until last year's release of the Fate Core System book (the Fate SRD is this book in SRD form), there was no ...


0

The example from the SRD that follows the passage you quoted would seem to indicate that named NPCs draw from the GM fate point pool and do not get a personal fate point pool. Amanda is running a climactic conflict, where the PCs are battling a nemesis they’ve been trying to subdue for several scenarios now. Here are the characters in the scene: ...


1

You have 2 questions: What is a scene? When do I roll? They are both pretty simple to answer, in fact, they both have official answers for the Fate Core or FAE systems. FAE is just an implementation of Fate Core with certain dials set in certain positions. If you have questions about FAE, you can usually use the Fate Core answers without difficulty. ...


1

Depending on how much detail you want to delve into, you can set the example scene as a simple oppposed challenge, where both the gypsy lady and the casino patron roll appropriate skills like Rapport vs Willpower (and invoke aspects as needed) and the story goes the winner's way; or you can set it up as a conflict, where the gypsy and the patron attack each ...


3

Bypassing stress in the situations you mentionned is playing by the rules. But don't take my word for it, let's see what Fate Core tells us. When to use stress? "In brief, stress represents the ephemeral toll of participating in a conflict, whereas consequences are the lingering effects [...]" (FC 50) So you need to be in a Conflict for stress to be ...


12

Bypassing stress and forcing consequences is confusing and risky behavior. It's not a way the system was designed to be played, and will create problems. A lot of things in Fate were meant to be tweaked by you, but this isn't one of them. (See below for the Silver Rule.) One of the problems that arises, as you've seen, is the players' confusion. It's hard ...


14

It becomes part of the character when it's more important than the other aspects that they have. Something as ephemeral as the Create Advantage action probably won't change a character in such a fundamental way, and (probably) neither will getting an item. Hmm. Example time: We've got a character with a couple of aspects: "Always stand up against ...


3

The short answer is yes. It is because of the Bronze Rule i.e. the Fate Fractal on Page 270 of the Fate Core rulebook. In Fate, you can treat anything in the game world like it’s a character. Anything can have aspects, skills, stunts, stress tracks, and consequences if you need it to. The trick is to describe the elements you are dealing with in ...


1

If the system mechanics are not a problem, then this is really a roleplay question, to wit: "Can that specific player successfully portray two identifiable in-game personas at the same time?" The burden here is mostly on the player rather than the GM. Perhaps it might help to use different accents, or face different directions, like Gollum's ...


7

The bronze rule is quite modular. You do not need to flesh out a whole character. You may just do fine with a bare "Supplies" stress track, which gets attacked by circumstances, events and some sorts of player actions, and is defended by player skills. It probably gets cleared when the team has a chance to resupply. If the supply challenges are important to ...


11

The other answers are addressing the context of the narrative and the general tone of Fate, and at the table they're probably more useful. But let's answer the question literally too: You need to inflict 24 shifts of harm in a single hit to take out the average unprepared "main" NPC. That's shifts of harm, so I'm not taking into account whatever she rolled ...


10

It takes as many shifts of harm to take someone out as it takes. The amount is arbitrary, since the character may have more or less stress boxes, consequences, stunts, etc. Asking how many is kinda like asking how long a piece of string is. To calculate someone's plot armor against getting taken out by a single attack, you'll need to add up the following, ...


0

Interesting question! There's two ways for a character to end up being taken out: a) The player loses the conflict, giving the opponent control over its outcome, by not being able to fill in any more stress boxes and consequences. b) The player concedes the conflict, possibly to avoid further consequences, agreeing to have their character knocked down but ...


2

Although I agree with the others in that you can definitely have hidden aspect. However, you could handle this with an event based compel as well. Something along the lines of: Because the door is booby trapped and you do not know about it, it makes sense that, unfortunately, you would trigger the trap while opening the door and be hit by a poisoned ...


4

I'm not sure which ruleset you're referring to, but I think you've misread. From Fate Core, from the section entitled Secret or Hidden Aspects: Some skills also let you use the create an advantage action to reveal aspects that are hidden, either on NPCs or environments—in this case, the GM simply tells you what the aspect is if you get a tie or better ...


0

2nd case: the sun is there, but is one skilled enough to trick / maneuver the enemy to face it? Just because something is there be it shadows or fire or something else does not mean the character automaticly could take effective advantage of it. Also note that one of the uses of fp is to declare minor details. With gm approval of course.


8

So, let's set things out here. The door is trapped. The players know this. The characters don't. How does one deal with this? The oblivious characters carry on as normal. If they have no reason to suspect the door is trapped, they probably walk straight into it. (The trap that is, not the door.) If they do suspect it, and it's reasonable the ...


4

The Fate Core book addresses it this way, on page 156. As the scene unfolds, players might suggest features of the environment that are perfect as aspects. If the GM described the scene as being poorly lit, a player should be able to invoke the Shadows to help on a Stealth roll even if she hadn’t previously established it as an aspect. If the ...



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