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15

The game (full disclosure: I wrote it) is predicated on determining positive or negative outcomes, which happen irrespective of the consequences for the various characters, or success or failure. In a recent game I had a very positive outcome (enemy in jail, framed for attempted murder) by having my character accidentally shoot herself in the knee, which was ...


12

It's a game about people whose ambition exceeds their common sense, and they invariably get themselves into trouble by crossing certain lines. Greed, lust, and other sins are always involved. It is usually funny but sometimes it is sad. I think the Guy Ritchie route is a good one. Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels is a note-perfect Fiasco. Do your ...


10

playset author here. Glad you had fun with it! You did everything right. My decision to omit the stunt dice from the aftermath was intentional, precisely to increase the chance that everyone would have lower/worse Aftermath totals. The playset is modeled after slasher flicks, after all; rarely does anyone escape unscathed. And regarding the Tilt, I should ...


9

If I were doing this, I would write up a number of mini-sheets for minor NPCs (with or without names or story relevance). Then, if a main character dies, that player can take over the role of an NPC. Think of the players and GM as two teams in cooperation with one another (to have fun, naturally), and when one PC dies, the player "switches teams", taking on ...


9

Yes, it's to enforce pacing—it's not a fiasco without both big wins and terrible losses. Secondarily, it incentivises balancing the dice taken, so that later there are still both good and bad outcomes to choose from. Running out of one die color can happen if people grab all the "good" outcomes early (perhaps out of habit, striving to "win"?), but it ...


9

One way would be to frame them in the movies of Guy Ritchie Both Lock, Stock and Snatch were very high-grossing films in the UK. The essence of the capers is that they're Crime Comedies focusing on (TV Tropes warning) A Simple Plan - TVTropes. Fiasco doesn't need pop-culture references to describe it. One way of describing it: A bunch of desperate ...


8

Your heart is in the right place in wanting to choose a game that accommodates everyone, but you may be doing your friends a disservice by trying to perfectly anticipate their tastes and abilities. If you end up accidentally "typecasting" them in a way that's not accurate, they'll never have the chance to show or discover that they can do more than their ...


8

Locations are important to the game because they are important to your characters, just like the Needs and Items are. (It's actually a matter of "It's important, because the rules say it's important", but that's not an answer that's of any use to you.) Locations are places where something either has happened or will happen that's going to have an impact on ...


6

Caveat: I have not playtested this as of yet. Setup During the character's death scene, have him create a Fractal (FC270) from the use of his remaining fate points and the consequences that have been inflicted on him and his own aspects. This Fractal is now for all intents and purposes the player's new 'character'. It is linked to the other characters by ...


6

I don't see why not. Part of the point of the game is the relationships between characters; thus, it's natural that consequences for one character may also affect another. If Bob's trying to convince Sally to do something dumb, and he succeeds, Sally's life sucks more. I would be a little bit more worried if you or the other players were establishing scenes ...


4

Sometimes you need to take a step back and say, "Hey, guys, this was supposed to be Bob's scene, so let's angle things towards him." Make sure that the scene is spotlighting the right character. It's fine for consequences to bleed out to other characters, though. If the action starts focusing on other characters, however, get the group to postpone it for ...


4

13th Age has a rule call "Fight in Spirit", which allows a dead or unconscious player to grant a bonus to any players who involves the dead/incapacitated character in his narrative. For instance, say the party Fighter is down, another player can say "I remember how the Fighter would keep fighting on despite the odds and I've picked up some tricks from him", ...


3

The way I see it, it's not necessarily a frequently visited location, although it can be. I have played a game where the location 'Captain's Quarters' was only visited once or twice, but it was a pivotal moment for the whole arc of the characters involved. I have also played a run through where we used the named location over and over again, so it's up to ...


3

You don't have to. Either they will be important (as in a game I played where one location was the old run-down mansion that ruined my character with renovation costs, and the "place where she is secretly buried" nearby), or they won't be important. What is important about Locations is that they give you a springboard and framework from which to launch and ...


3

One thing about Fate: ANYONE can propose compels. So, when a player has no character, he can still, theoretically, participate by proposing compels - possibly to both sides of the conflict. Some may not like this style of play, and others might opt to restrict it, but this is a great way to remain active despite your character being out of the action.


2

Based on my experience, Fiasco is a game for people who love to improvise and participate, so a Watcher would have to at least play the part of the "submissive toady", not just watch and hit something every now and then. Fiasco is also about story, not stats, so the power-gamer is at first glance a bad fit. That aside, Fiasco does offer something for ...


2

It affects the results, but not too much. You're less likely to have the highest White or Black total during the Tilt if you have stunt dice. The playset isn't specific, but I assume you don't roll them for the Tilt. Everyone is going to tend to a worse result in the Aftermath, which seems fitting for the genre.


2

Even if you don't have a premade character to play, the new FATE Core rules (so new they aren't even out in hard copy yet - I'm taking this info from my .pdf copy!) allow for a way to make a quick and dirty character. All you do is define the following High concept aspect Best skill (the new rules have you put your skills in on a pyramid-type structure, ...


1

Ultimately locations are merely scene dressing for any story unless you actively make the location a character unto itself. A great example of this is the way action movies (particularly martial arts movies) frequently involve the setting of the scene of a showdown to influence the course of the fight and its ultimate outcome. The cliche of the villain ...


1

With the collaborative narrative framework of Fate, a character should probably only die if the player (and the GM and other players) really want or need for him to - a suicide mission to save the world, or some other kind of noble sacrifice. If a player is leaving the group or just wants to play a new character, this could be a good narrative hook, but ...



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