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3

Within the game universe, they are just techniques, qualities or skills of the individual. A PC might refer to them in character by their name ("I took a second wind", or "I avoided his attack with some evasive footwork"), but the same PC would not use the name of the mechanic ("I expended a Superiority Die"). In this sense, the die is only a mechanic to ...


1

In character, they represent skill/training, opportunity, alertness and fatigue: Skill/training determines the amount of dice available, the size of dice - it measures how much additional impact the character potentially could make in a combat due to their talents. Opportunity is the natural limit of when certain things can be done. An NPC combatant ...


4

I believe they signify purely skilled maneuvers which reflect a specific complicated ability that requires mastery, precision and/or sheer strength. This actually works to explain the increase in die power as well. Consider the increased potential as the mastery you've acquired after practicing these maneuvers for extended periods of time as you level. As ...


1

I believe that it's an oversight of nomenclature. In my opinion, the ~spell gained at 8th/14th/20th level~ language excludes the spells gained at 1st level because the 8th/14th/20th (class) level spells are the only newly learned spells being gained at those levels, whereas at 3rd (class) level, the arcane trickster is learning three new spells. If the ...


9

Evasive Footwork: ...[add] the number to your AC until you stop moving PHB 74 Movement: On your turn, you can m ove a distance up to your speed PHB 190 Even if you run for 10 minutes straight, in respect to the game you can only move on your turn, so you stop moving at the end of your turn. The AC bonus of Evasive Footwork lasts at most ...


6

No Per Jeremy Crawford, "The benefit of Evasive Footwork ends when your move ends. It doesn't last from turn to turn." Also, "Evasive Footwork grants its AC bonus only during your current movement." Once your turn ends, you are no longer moving and thus the +AC stops.


-3

Yes since shield already involves time travel Shield is a profoundly strange spell that involves changing your AC after you have confirmed you were hit then going back and checking again. Since this is already traveling back I see no problem with the fighter activating Precision Attack since its text about "...before or after making the attack roll..." ...


10

You can add it after the roll, but not after someone else uses a reaction to respond to the result of the roll (i.e., because the roll indicated a hit and that result was declared): You can use this maneuver before or after making the attack roll, but before any effects of the attack are applied. The attack's success causing someone else to choose to ...


4

Specific beats general. The general rules are on p. 189-190: On your turn, you can move a distance up to your speed and take one action. You decide whether to move first or take your action first. You choose when to take a bonus action during your turn, unless the bonus action’s timing is specified ... You can break up your movement on ...


4

As you quoted: When you take the Dash action, you gain extra movement for the current turn. If you knew at the start of your turn that you'd need the extra movement, then by RAW you could "take the Dash action" (but not immediately move anywhere), attack the first target, then move to the second target and attack. Given this is possible, and that you ...


10

You could certainly Dash first to increase you movement allowance, then attack the first mook, then move, then attack the second mook. That's not exactly what you're asking about though, since you want to see the result of the first attack before deciding to Dash. In the strict rules as written, however, only movement is explicitly allowed to be broken up ...



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