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10

You should probably begin by focusing on maneuvers that are executed with a particular hand. Once you have those down, learn the same maneuvers, with your off-hand. At that point, start learning maneuvers that require both hands to be active. Then, just make sure to keep practicing. You don't need anyone else with you to practice, but sparring is important ...


9

There is only one rule of LRP fighting: be a safe fighter. You get the idea. A good LRP fighter is a safe one. So, make sure you follow the safety rules of your system and you will improve as a fighter. Do not think that Renaissance rapier and main gauche techniques will help you. They will hinder you; you cannot stab with a LRP sword. Rapiers are all about ...


7

Every historical manuscript we have today on medieval sword fighting techniques describes and depicts the shield being used in the left hand, which is the off hand for 70–90% of the modern population (which is reasonably extrapolated to historical populations). As Alex P notes in a comment, the sword is actually a tool of finesse and control, not a blunt ...


6

For general "large weapon" tips, check out "Be Nasty with a Boffer Polearm". Though that article does not directly address how to fight in closed spaces, its general tips are still relevant in a crowded setting. Choose your battles There are likely some places in the forest where you have full use of your weapon. Make sure your teammates know where to ...


5

If you actually want to learn to fight Florentine I suggest you find your local Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) group, and talk to the heavy fighters. They practice various fighting styles including Florentine (two weapon fighting) and since it actually hurts to be hit with a ratan sword, they tend to have practical advice. There are also some good ...


5

Step one: practice off-hand until it's comfortable. Step two: practice with both. The first step in learning florentine or case (the rapier term for two-weapons) is becoming capable with the off hand. The sequence of learning for SCA training, both light weapons and heavy, is often: footwork parries. basic attacks, including for heavy: a downswing, ...


4

Practice. Against a real person is best, but even just practicing your attacks, blocks, and parries can be helpful. Most martial arts have routines of these called 'katas' (in Japanese MAs, anyway) meant to reinforce the skills practiced as well as the need to flow from one movement into the next.


4

The main gauche is not detailed in the Mind's Eye Theatre rulebook, so any decisions made about its effectiveness are going to depend on the Storyteller's judgment. (For example, if the weapon comes from the Armory rulebooks, compatibility with MET is not assured.) However, presuming that it works in a manner analogous to the rapier (p.232), then the answer ...


4

While in the LARP I play in nothing that large is a legal weapon (polearms tap out at 72"), there are a few different things I can think of that might help: If your system/training allows for it, adapt your weapon so that it has a thrusting tip (morning stars–spiked maces–had spikes on them, this is simply simulating the effect). Thrusting weapons are ...


2

There are good reasons why historical treatises show the shield almost always in the left. One is practical - defenders in castles have an advantage by havin the shield on the left hand. One is religious - the left hand was considered to be inferior for religious reasons. The term for the left hand is the sinister hand... while the right is the dexter hand. ...



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