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-4

I suspect that the creators of the D&D Fly skill made an oversight by talking about 'failing to fly' without talking about how one loses altitude rapidly. For a real-world flying machine, there are multiple ways to descend rapidly; some are better controlled than others, though. Ballistic Falls and Straight Dives Loren Pechtel mentioned the idea of ...


-2

I don't see why you would need to make a skill check in the first place--just fold your wings. Personally, I would require a skill check to pull out of the plummet, though, unless you can shed your speed by some other means (say, feather fall.)


2

Yes In almost every game or circumstance, it would seem pretty odd if you couldn't do something and intentionally fail. There are surely some exceptions, perhaps such as psychic or magic attempts with certain rules or logical commitments needed. If you want to fail but look like you were trying, that might require (a note to the GM, if you want to fool ...


1

Surely this is a matter of: player states desired aim, DM assigned target number and appropriate skill, roll to determine success or failure, In most cases you dont deliberately fail a check you just succeed at a different one. Your bard wants to sing so badly to drive customers from a Tavern .. actually that surprisingly difficult to do well :)


2

From a strictly RAW POV, with a DM out to get you, possibly, but you can avoid it. As ltab notes: Both PF and 3.5 simply state "When your character uses a skill, ...", with no actual conditions for when this is/is not the case. By this logic, if you make a fly check, you might have to roll and proceed using that result. But there are ways around this: ...


5

Can you intentionally fail a Fly skill check, or any other skill check for that matter, if you, or your character for that matter, decides that the effects of failing the check are what is desired in the situation? The other answers cover the Fly situations, and I agree that there you can intentionally fail, with the caveat that it's actually a failure: ...


6

Yes. (ish) As Sandwich points out, Fly (and skills in general) generally only need to be used when there is some possibility of failure or difficulties. Falling from a height would not usually be considered such. It becomes rolling dice for the sake of rolling dice. Interestingly enough however, this interpretation is not completely borne out in the RAW. ...


14

From http://www.d20pfsrd.com/skills/fly You generally need only make a Fly check when you are attempting a complex maneuver. Without making a check, a flying creature can remain flying at the end of its turn so long as it moves a distance greater than half its speed. It can also turn up to 45 degrees by sacrificing 5 feet of movement, can rise at half ...


0

Yes. This is what makes roleplaying interesting, and is an option in every roleplaying game. A game that forces the player's choice is not a roleplaying game. As far as I know, there is no rule against this in 3.x/d20. Edit I'll leave a quote I heard a couple years back on the subject of rules for roleplaying: In poker, there are no rules for ...


0

Cloak of the Bat - Usefulness - 50/100, Cost- 6/10, Very cheap, can only be used at night, in caves, or in magical darkness. Cloak of the bat is a magic item which can be purchased for 26,000gp. It gives a +5 Competence Bonus to Hide checks, can allow the flier to fly for 7 straight minutes as per the spell fly and can also allow the user to polymorph ...


1

I suggest the feat Outsider Wings from Races of Faerûn, p. 167 Prerequisites Celestial Bloodline or Fiendish Bloodline, Aasimar or Tiefling, Fortitude, Reflex, and Will Saves +2 Benefit You gain wings (feathered if an aasimar, batlike if a tiefling), allowing you to fly at your land speed (average maneuverability). A medium or heavy load that would ...



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