Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

33

Yes...depending Alignment causes a lot of arguments around the D&D community. There are a pair of rock-solid methods: the Sanctify the Wicked spell, and the redemption rules, both of them found in the Book of Exalted Deeds. The BoED can be a controversial book in some groups, but those rules are a definite method of getting the lich back on the straight ...


13

You’ll have to calculate monsters’ CMB and CMD, since 3.5 did not use those, and you’ll have to redo NPCs’ skills, since Pathfinder changed those a fair bit. You will also have to update humanoid characters’ ability scores, racial features, and class features, since Pathfinder changed a few of those, too. This should be ...


12

Evil? We're SAVING the world! No one thinks they're the villain. Outside of a few very adolescent power fantasy type cults, nearly every other cult is based in imagining it's doing something for either the greater good or at least the good of it's members, and has rationalized all the things it has to do in that regard. Sacrifice a baby? The baby was ...


10

The group I game with most of the time runs a Forgotten Realms campaign setting. We have played it in 2.0, 3.0, 3.5 and now use Pathfinder. There is very little change that we have to make. For 90-95% of it we just use the Pathfinder rules as is. We simply remade our characters for each edition as needed and custom FR specific monsters are converted to ...


10

Okay, let's take a look. Actually, yes. Book of Exalted Deeds introduces Sanctified creature template and the spell to create such creatures. Also, there is an inherently good kind of lich - the baelnorn. There may be more purely mechanical means to change alignment. Sure. Any character smart enough to become a lich should be capable of devising a plan to ...


9

It can be fun, for sure, but when doing this you have to be careful, and remember that in the books those characters may be the stars, but in your game it's the PCs who are the main characters and the stars. It becomes even more tempting than ever to run the game for your NPCs instead of for your PCs when the NPCs are popular literary characters.


9

Yes there was, the cataclysmic event is called the Spellplague. Mystra dies, huge upheavals happen for a decade including natural disasters, arcane magic goes away for a time, etc. I don't think it escaped any Realmsian's notice, that's for sure; the effects were blatant and profound. The 4e guide is set in 1479 DR while the 3e one was in 1372 DR, so ...


8

I wrote about this for Dragon magazine! The shade has a 3.5 update in Dragon #322 (August 2004). It's divided into a Savage Species style progression for the article, but is otherwise functionally identical to the version in both the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2001) and Races of Faerun (2003), except for the following changes: Level adjustment is ...


7

This will be based mainly on Pathfinder, as this is the system I play in. Adjust for your own rules. Note that for a lot of your questions, there is no very specific RAW answer (this is often the case with Antimagic Fields). I indicated all the RAW points and the most probable/logical result, but in the end there is still a lot of room for DM interpretation. ...


6

The closest thing to an official sound for the drow language might come from TSR's The Drow of the Underdark (1991), which describes some drow vocabulary and phrases. The book describes drow speech as follows: Drow are as eloquent and musical in their speech as other elves, and are capable of readily reproducing the sounds of other languages. Most drow ...


6

If the ability was not replaced or otherwise affected by a substitution level, it works the same way as if the substitution level was not taken. Please note that Paladin4/Crescent Moon Knight 2 is actually a Paladin 6 with a different set of class features. Namely, the first substitution level replaces Paladin's 4th level and trades turn undead class ...


5

There's a fundamental assumption error here. High level D&D parties, especially ones with access to 9th level spells don't need to ever enter dungeons unless it is for their own amusement. We begin by articulating strategies of 18th level casters faced with an imposing dungeon: Their central strategy is to force the "defenders" to emerge from behind ...


5

There was a supplemental book entitled "Aurora's Whole Realms Catalog" which was kind of a shopper's guide to the forgotten realms. Wasn't a very thick book but it had common items and prices. You could use that as a base.


5

There's nothing published that I'm aware of. I have a reasonably good knowledge of the Forgotten Realms material presented in Living Forgotten Realms modules, and I don't know of any night sky material there, either. Candlekeep has an unofficial article about the subject, which is based on official material. There is also a comprehensive discussion thread ...


5

I agree with Richard. Having famous, powerful characters from Forgotten Realms involved in your game can be a good way to shoot yourself in your feet. They can be so powerful to make trivial any quest and make your characters feel useless, and meeting them while your characters are low level is unlikely at best. Having Drizzt or Elminster have an active ...


5

I don't tend to use prominent NPCs a lot if at all. However, if I did, my top priority would be to keep them from overshadowing the PCs. Particularly in a heroic fantasy setting, the players ought to be the ones who get to feel like heroes. It's quite damaging to a campaign if the NPCs are saving the day all the time. Since Forgotten Realms NPCs tend ...


5

Well I thought someone was going to propose a build with the classes i've exposed. That didn't happen, but heres what I've been collecting, and my idea: The data: Dragons of Eberron LOREDRAKE(Page 31) Magic flows through every dragon’s blood. The loredrake devotes her life to harnessing this power and understanding the mysteries of magic. ...


5

Discussion from 2010 suggests the wall is still there, and unbelievers are on a timer before they're cemented into the wall of the faithless. Quoth: It's still there until they specifically say it's not. We've been told to assume that unless something is described as different or gone, then it's still there. Details of the wall: Some minimal ...


5

You could simply use the Fall of Netheril itself as reason enough, since during that time even magic itself stopped working. Personally, I would find that a convincing reason for people to believe it to be a magical dead zone. However, any disaster, mundane or otherwise could keep people from attempting casting in the area/region. Fear can be a powerful ...


5

At the risk of stating the obvious, you can still say that it is a dead magic zone in your campaign. Also, all kinds of rumors and misinformation spread, especially amoungst the lower classes with limited communications. Magic and psionics obviously gives D&D more communications than the real-world middle ages, but not by all that much. If the ...


5

There is no Shadow Weave equivalent of dead magic zones, and to understand why, it's helpful to look at where DMZs came from. The concept of dead and wild magic is relatively new to the Realms: it dates to the Time of Troubles, when events during the Godswar tore holes in the fabric of the Weave. These holes are dead magic zones; other perturbations in the ...


4

Hmm, if you want to inflict some generic bad luck to everyone around the person the fun stuff would have to be mostly a DM fiat because mechanical rules would not be able to encompass the wanted results right. If you just want a class based on bad luck then at low levels have some -1 luck modifiers to stuff like combat that affects everyone within a certain ...


4

Here's something from the Internet Archive: http://web.archive.org/web/20010718003823/http://www.netspace.org/~dwb/vast/ylraphon.html


4

The D&D 4e forgotten realms handbook was very well laid out. It describes the more recent changes that make it fit into the 4e world.


4

No. The entire concept of Abeir and Toril being separate things was introduced by 4e. It's hard to prove a negative to the satisfaction of a disbeliever*, but this was simply the case before. Prior to 4e, the world was called Abeir-Toril. There was never any explanation for why it had a hyphenated name, what that signified, or whether the hyphen even meant ...


4

The density of electrum depends on the exact proportions of gold and silver, but ranges from around 12.5 g/cm³ to about 16.5 g/cm³ †. Assuming the book is effectively a solid cube of electrum 24 × 36 × 4 inches, its volume would be 3,456 cubic inches. This is equal to 56,634 cm³. Given the density range above, this means it could weigh anything from ...


4

The horse breeds are in the Champions of Valor monster section, hidden under the "Agents of Good" heading (starting on page 153).


3

Specifically to the Geographic locations bit, the whole map was rescaled. Several countries/nations were removed/condensed/destroyed. Anauroch was removed, and replaced by the nation of Netheril.The level of the Sea of Fallen Stars fell, changing a number of port cities to land-locked. An entire new continent was inherted from Abeir.


3

Here are some links about the Wall of the Faithless: NWN2 Wiki and FR Wiki I've read a lot of game books and novels set in the FR, but not much is mentioned about the WotF. The only place where it plays a major role is the game expansion Neverwinter Nights 2: Mask of the Betrayer


3

According to my (precious) copy of Aurora's Whole Realms Catalog, p. 131, standard table wine can be had in bulk at wholesale prices for 20 gp for a tun, which is about† 256 gallons. There are about† 8 pints in a gallon, giving a wholesale cost of [20gp / (256 gallons x 8 pints/gallon) ≈ 0.0098gp] slightly less than 1cp per pint to the inn or tavern keeper. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible