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17

Yes. Mike Mearls and others on the WOTC RPG team, have said on several occasions that Realms is the default setting for 5e. When I was working on third and fourth there was this dialogue of "Should we just embrace The Realms as the core setting?" And we were always very wary of a big backlash. Honestly people have complained, but I think when you look ...


16

All FR gods and other setting proper nouns are the intellectual property of WotC - probably copyright, maybe some trademark, maybe even some trade dress... The specifics aren't all that important in this case. Technically, legally, and unless you have a bunch of money and lawyers to try to fight it, you need permission to use them. This kind of use is NOT ...


16

"Souls" - This is a distinction that the rules do not make. There is no definition of "soul." In AD&D 1e there was a distinction between who had "souls" and who had "spirits" (like elves) but in later editions that's left to your own pet view of Catholic theology and is not part of the game. The resurrection spell (and raise the dead, and reincarnate) ...


13

Evil? We're SAVING the world! No one thinks they're the villain. Outside of a few very adolescent power fantasy type cults, nearly every other cult is based in imagining it's doing something for either the greater good or at least the good of it's members, and has rationalized all the things it has to do in that regard. Sacrifice a baby? The baby was ...


12

You cannot copyright a name. Still, this doesn't mean you can use them freely, because characters can be copyrighted. The deities in Forgotten Realms are no doubt fictional characters with individual characteristics, so they are subject to copyright. This means that, you can use the names, but if you also borrow the characteristics (appearance, moral ...


11

The player handbook page 118, when describing the School of Necromancy subclass feature says: Most people see necromancers as menacing , or even villainous, due to the close association of death. Not all necromancers are evil , but the forces they manipulate are considered taboo by many societies. There is room in the novels for non evil necromancers ...


10

Yes, not all warlock powers originate from pacts. Warlock powers can also stem from magical heritages, and in fact, this seems to be common. This is made explicit in Complete Mage, page 7. Warlocks typically claim that [their] proficiency with magic comes from their bloodline - or, in some cases, from a pact made with powerful entities that permanently ...


9

There is, RAW, no concept or definition of "owning" a plane While gods can have divine realms, the Forgotten Realms concept of whole Outer Planes ruled over by a small number of gods is both unique to that setting (meaning rules in other sources such as Deities & Demigods do not support it) and not given parameters within that setting. The Outer Planes ...


8

From the description of the Necromancy school in the basic rules v1 (emphasis mine) Necromancy spells manipulate the energies of life and death. Such spells can grant an extra reserve of life force, drain the life energy from another creature, create the undead, or even bring the dead back to life. Creating the undead through the use of ...


7

I'd say all of Bruenor's major deeds and some of the minor ones, but only up until he left the throne for his final adventure with Drizzt. So I'd say for a guideline the stuff that happened in the crystal shard. The story about Bruenor and the black dragon when he first returns to Mithral hall. The war with the dark elves, and the war with the orcs and the ...


7

I don't think you need to search very far - See these quotes from the warlock class description (Complete Arcane P. 5-6) WARLOCK Born of a supernatural bloodline, a warlock seeks to master the perilous magic that suffuses his soul [...] [...] Adventures: Many warlocks are champions of dark and chaotic powers. Long ago, they (or in some cases, ...


6

Just like in the real world, this varies a lot. Every community of "nature" types is different and can't be put neatly into one of two buckets labelled "will react with violence" and "won't react with violence." Even within one of the categories you called out, it varies because every person, and every community made up of people, have different goals and ...


6

Yes, your interpretation is correct. For sake of explanation, we will use Silverymoon: The Wards of Silverymoon The city of Silverymoon is protected by a powerful magical effect called a mythal. This potent form of elven high magic forbids the casting of several types of spells, causes other spells to be permanently in effect, and allows the ...


5

Dugmaren Brightmantle seems like a good candidate. From the Wikipedia page: Dugmaren Brightmantle is the dwarf deity of scholarship, discovery, and invention. Dugmaren shares the Dwarven Mountain on the Outlands with Dumathoin and Vergadain. Dugmaren appears as an elderly dwarf with sparkling blue eyes. His domain isn't strictly light, but those ...


5

From the Basic rules (Player's book, v0.2) Necromancy spells manipulate the energies of life and death. Such spells can grant an extra reserve of life force, drain the life energy from another creature, create the undead, or even bring the dead back to life. So, you could be a necromancer who focuses on the "life" side of their powers. I'd say ...


5

The three deities you reference (Bhaal, Myrkul, and Leira) are listed in Appendix B of the 5E Players Handbook (p. 294).


4

Just from reading the product blurbs on Wizards' product catalog, the upcoming Tyranny of Dragons series of adventures sees the Cult of the Dragon trying to bring Tiamat into the Realms, and the Harpers & Zhentarim banding together to fight against them. This could conceivably lead to mass destruction and upheaval. As Joshua said, to know for sure, we'll ...


4

The density of electrum depends on the exact proportions of gold and silver, but ranges from around 12.5 g/cm³ to about 16.5 g/cm³ †. Assuming the book is effectively a solid cube of electrum 24 × 36 × 4 inches, its volume would be 3,456 cubic inches. This is equal to 56,634 cm³. Given the density range above, this means it could weigh anything from ...


4

The horse breeds are in the Champions of Valor monster section, hidden under the "Agents of Good" heading (starting on page 153).


4

Sort of: The Players Handbook does not support any specific world over another. The sample characters, domain descriptions, and other sections in the book use examples that cover the gamut of game worlds. The list of deities in Appx B in the PHB covers 4 ancient earth pantheons (Celtic, Norse, Greek, and Egyptian), and the major game worlds for D&D ...


4

Population in 3.5: 23,192. Population in 4E: intentionally vague. I say intentionally vague because the Neverwinter campaign book clearly talks about a mass exodus and a progressive growth caused by the new wave of adventure, intrigue and commerce. It's hard to make a census when a big part of your city is lawless, in ruin or just a big hole in the ground. ...


3

No, but the Dead Three are still around Several gods died during the Time of Troubles, notably including the Dead Three: Bane, god of tyranny, Bhaal, god of murder, and Myrkul, god of death. However, gods are difficult to destroy in the Forgotten Realms, and all three of the dead gods have devised schemes to return to power. Bane’s plot was successful, and ...


3

I believe that ownership of planes (barring lawful-aligned planes which are likely to have actual laws governing their ownership) is probably not a legal state. Lolth probably owns her layer of the Abyss by killing everyone else who lays claim to it and loudly proclaiming it to be hers until everyone agrees that she is the undisputed owner of the layer. To ...


3

Typically published adventures don't come with definitive starting dates. This is so a group's DM can set it to whenever makes the most sense for the group. For example, there is no reason the game could not be run 1373 DR (Year of the Rogue Dragons), and very little of Hoard of the Dragon Queen would need to be changed. Indeed given that the common names ...


3

In my campaigns I treat animals like they do have souls. The logic is that Humans, Elves, Dwarves, Orcs etc. all technically qualify as intelligent animals, and they have souls. I'd say any naturally created living creature (was born/hatched and not made in a lab or animated from clay or some such) has a soul. The souls may be weaker or less sophisticated, ...


2

You've found them all. The Forgotten Realms was first published for AD&D 1st edition. When 2nd edition came out, the change in spells and available classes was explained through the Godswar aka The Time of Troubles. The introduction of D&D 3e was exceptional in that there was no overarching, global event introduced to explain the rules changes. ...


2

There is a Pathfinder prestige class Jinx. One of their main class abilities is: Radial Curse (Sp) Bad luck lingers and spreads. Anyone, friend or foe, who comes within 30 feet of a jinx suffers a -1 penalty to hit and -1 penalty to AC. A jinx cannot turn off radial curse, although it can be repressed in an antimagic field or by dispel magic. As ...


2

Version 0.2 of the Basic rules includes a list of Forgotten Realms deities, and it looks like most of the old deities have returned, including some that died before 3e was even released. Bhaal, Leira, and Mrykul -the three you mention in your question- are all back on the list. So are Azuth, Mystra, and Savras, and most of the other popular formerly-dead ...


2

Yes, the old deities are really coming back. Along with the list of old deities in the forgotten realms section of the gods listed in the updated basic rules, (and the gods listed among-st many pantheon in the player's handbook) there is also the "Sundering" story line. The Player's handbook lists 39 divine for the forgotten realms setting with their ...


2

Some random thoughts, based purely on half-remembered Wikipedia and magazine articles on the subject of cults. To be taken with a heaping helping of salt. No one labels their own faith a “cult.” The term is always used by others to describe the group. For the purposes of this answer, I assume “cult” is a relatively small group of ...



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