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6

Traveling by sea might have been really dangerous - not more than traveling by land in certain areas - mostly because of living hazards. Crews that do not pay homage and make sacrifices to Umberlee, or that are not protected by Valkur or Shaundakul, might be ambushed by creatures of the deep, and the same goes for enemies of the Society of the Kraken. Some ...


1

For strict 5E material, you should stick to Momonga-sama's answer . But if you're still in need of ideas and inspiration, you could consider acquiring the Menzoberranzan: City of Intrigue supplement (may be hard to get a physical copy, but PDF is also available). Chapter 4 in this supplement is devoted to the City of Spiders, spanning around 20 pages. This ...


9

I got an answer by Ed Greenwood (one of the authors of Murder in Baldur's Gate and... seriously, you should know who he is). Here's what he had to say: You've got it right: with the established part of Baldur's Gate CRAMMED into the bowl that descends to the river, and with the population of the city growing by leaps and bounds, and with a constant ...


3

As best I can determine, the return of Myrkul post Sundering is not actually detailed anywhere yet. There are references to Myrkul in one sundering novel, but they aren't actually helpful to what you're looking for.


5

Here's some artistic renderings of Menzoberranzan: Now obviously this is an older map, so just kind of X out the houses that don't exist anymore like Oblodra (dropped into the Clawrift) and Do'Urden.


13

I'd highly recommend that you purchase or borrow Out of the Abyss, since it is the only source of information about Menzoberranzan in 5th Edition of Dungeons & Dragons. The information is pretty huge and is about 20 pages long. There are lots of physical descriptions. Furthermore there is tons of material about the Underdark. If your adventure is taking ...


8

There is an early R. A. Salvatore Drizzt book set in Menzoberranzan: Homeland, the first book in the Dark Elf Trilogy. I seem to remember Drow using levitate abilities to gain access to buildings, but that was a long time ago, so I could be way off. As I recall, the city is dominated by powerful houses which war with each other. I imagine the holds of the ...


11

Plants and Fungi Not surprisingly there are edible mushrooms and plants that adapted to the Underdark. There are hundreds of different wines produced from fungi. "Spiderblood" is a one of the most expensive and seasoned with spider's venom. Barrelstalk is a fungus as big as a tree. Only the inner flesh is edible. In the centre there is a large reservoir ...


9

Out of the Abyss (5e) The third adventure path for 5e, Out of the Abyss, features Underdark adventures. The second chapter of this book describes both prospects for foraging in the Underdark and seven separate edible fungi. The Underdark (3e) A little more about how the ecology of the Underdark works. Faezress--magic--provides the energy source for the ...


7

The great city of the Drow is Menzoberranzan, which is said to trade in "poisons, mushrooms, riding lizards, spell scrolls, wine, and water." Of those, only mushrooms (and sometimes the riding lizards) are edible. If they have wine, they ought to also have grapes somewhere. Though other types of wine (plum wine, for instance) can exist, it's unlikely that ...


7

The first new 5e FR Organized Play season starts in 1489 DR, in the future after the Spellplague. The FR team put together a bunch of novels and content for an event called "the Sundering" which largely undid all the massive 4e FR changes - Aber and Toril split back apart, Spellplague over, etc. The Spellplague lasted only from 1385-1395 per se, but its ...


10

Broadly speaking, Wizards keeps the clock moving forward in the Forgotten Realms, and doesn't generally release adventures and other content that happened chronologically in the past from previous content. The earliest D&D 5e playable content, the Tyranny of Dragons adventure series, starts in 1489 DR. The Spellplague stops being a major force in the ...


2

The Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide says the Spellplague was unleashed in 1385 DR (dale reckoning). Another upheaval known as the Sundering occurred a century later, and is also treated as in the past (ending somewhere around 1489 DR). I couldn't find the current year in the book, but for a character in Toril's 'present' the Spellplague should be old news.


6

Do whatever you like; humanity is not a precedent for fantasy races in a fantasy world. That is, just because humans must learn to speak doesn't mean that elves etc. can't sprout Elvish etc. as soon as they are born. Human development does not have to serve as an analogue of Elf development. Unless you want it to of course. The same is true of all racial ...


11

From what I see about 5e Elves and Dwarves it seems like it depends but let's assume this situation: Typical Tolkien-like structure of languages. What we have first is Dwarven and Elfish are alien. Those languages have no correlation to each other - Elfish borrowed some things from Welsh and Finnish, Dwarven - closer to Semitic family of languages. To ...


6

The character would know a culturally-taught language unless the background accounted for it. Although the PHB indicates that it is the physical race, that's really nonsensical given the character concept. This falls well within the expected tweaking of character background encouraged by the rule set. I cannot imagine it causing a problem.


9

Yes, according to DM's Guild Since Mearls always disavows speaking with authority, here's someone who is speaking with authority, writing today (7 June 2016): Hello [redacted], Thank you for contacting us regarding the DMs Guild. You can write for any timeframe of Forgotten Realms. All material produced must be 5th edition, but the history of ...


6

Any god will allow the use of any spell if it advances their interests. In D&D 5e, good means putting others before yourself and evil means putting yourself before others if you read the descriptions carefully. A spell can no more be good or evil than a hammer can. The specific usage of a spell can have good or evil intent. For example a god of the ...


13

The fact that a spell is marked "necromantic" doesn't mean that it's evil or that it has to do with undead; there's an important difference between necromancy-the-school-of-magic and necromancy-the-actual-act-of-creating-undead. The book doesn't explicitly say that any god will ban you from using any spell, but it's true that the use of certain spells might ...


7

Content set in the past is fine, content in the future is... maybe ok? Someone asked Mike Mearls a similar question on Twitter, to which he responded "Historical stuff is good for the Guild, as are regions like Maztica, etc." https://www.twitter.com/mikemearls/status/688178009203855362



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