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That article doesn't come out and say it, but the ultimate goal of petitioners is to become their deity. Sort of, anyway. See, a petitioner who dies faithfully following their deities' precepts loses their memories, like you've read; What you haven't read is that the memory-less soul that's left has the sole goal of pursuing that deities' philosophy. ...


1

In order to develop a plot, I recommend you have something encroaching in your heaven that is slowly but surely corrupting and destroying it. Have creatures become more and more aggressive over the course of the campaign, while having portions of the world subverted to malicious, dark causes. An excellent primer for this would be if a celestial decided ...


3

Pretty much all rules dictating deity worship are gone in 4e, replaced with DM discretion and recommended threats of story-based consequences for unpopular actions or beliefs within a subculture. Additionally, there is nothing in the rules preventing a character from worshipping multiple deities, cherry picking which parts of each that appeal to them. The ...


1

Actually, some warlocks get their powers from heritage - not just inheriting pacts (though it happens), but it's suggested from direct descent as well. Also consider some of the fluff offered by the Eldritch Theurge... "Just as the warlock can come from something other than a fiendish origin, so too can the eldritch theurge. Perhaps warlocks gain ...


3

Depends on the setting. In Eberron, this isn't a problem since the gods are basically absent and faith is faith. In a setting like Forgotten Realms, this could be a problem. From a traditional standpoint, gods in D&D don't like it when people who are too far outside their own alignment worship them. Sune might not be the best choice since your ...



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