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18

I'm going to lay out an easy, step-by-step method that is in parts inspired by and borrowed from a book of plots I own. What you'll get as a result is a situation to drop your players into and see what happens. Eureka by Engine Publishing is an excellent book of adventure plots that are designed to be adaptable to any game and any genre. The format of the ...


11

We've actually had lots of success with Dropbox - it's relatively easy for people to share character sheets, material, notes, etc. with each other (or the GM) using shared folders, and you can pull the files up on whatever phone/tablet/etc. you'd like. It also means the GM has access to the latest version of everyone's character sheet, and there's ...


11

Albatross Hexbooks and Hex Cahiers are available from Lulu (print-on-demand), and come in various grid styles and sizes, and are staple-bound to lay flat. They're designed to interoperate, so you can use a large-hex style for high-level mapping, and flesh out the details with the hexgrids in one of the smaller-scale notebooks, for example.


10

Roll20 is a subscription service that uses HTML5 features to work on all modern browsers. It may be what you are looking for. The features you are asking for are available on the free plan. However, support for tablets requires a paid subscription.


8

Playing devil's advocate for just a second here... You Can't Take a Plot - But You Can Take a Situation You cannot take the plot of another literary work and turn it into a game. Period. Before anyone goes ballistic, let me make a clear distinction here between situation and plot. Plot is the sequence of events that happen in a story. Situation is the ...


8

Quick Dice Roller allow to customize your dice and support almost all game system. Each dice can be a single roll (d6), a multiple roll (3d6) or any complex roll (3d6+(1d7/2)). Special functions can be used to emulate complex systems (like dice pool, exploding dice, roll&keep) and the built-in dice builder make the creation process very easy. It ...


7

It might be quicker and simpler to print out some hex pages and have a copy shop bind them for you.


7

Wilderness Survival.net, for basics of survival and techniques. Surviving in the Wild: 19 Common Edible Plants, good for understanding the right and wrong types of flora Population density estimates of some species of wild ungulates in Simanjiro plains, northern Tanzania and Wildlife Management: Estimating Wildlife Populations are papers about population ...


7

Masterplan on a Laptop + a cheap picoprojector + a DnD Insider account and some dice = DnD anywhere.


7

Take a look at Microscope. It just finished its playtest cycle and should be out soonish. The game is all about starting at the macro level and slowly zooming in on details of particular portions of the world. It's likely inspired by ARIA: Canticle of the Monomyth, way out of print. The Worlds book specifically addresses shared creation of the setting. Your ...


7

I have a cheap black-and-white laser printer and it has been the best payoff:cost purchase I've made related to gaming. Even with its rock-bottom hardware quality, it prints fast enough and cheaply per page, and most things don't suffer in B&W. It came with a "half" toner cartrige when I got it three years ago, and even with frequent use I only just ...


6

Dice bag looks useful especially since it can generate rolls in advance thus speeding up combat.


6

Dropbox is the only piece of technology that I've come to absolutely depend on for gaming. I mostly use it as GM. Syncing my long term notes between home and work, so I can jot down ideas wherever is essential. And I can see those notes mid game on my phone. As a player I find it less useful, but having backup PDFs of books and character sheets has been ...


6

There's a French RPG where characters are crusading Templar knights, called Miles Christi (French). It's not been translated into English nor have I used the system, but I've heard good things about how the game succeeds in giving players a feel for the environment. There's a really nice and enthusiastic write up of a small Miles Christi game held at SGA ...


6

Like I said in the (now deleted) comments, the Guide for running MapTool on Android is probably what are you looking for. MapTool is one of the well-known RP-Tools and it has all the features you mentioned, and even more. Plus, you can combine it with the other Tools (I wrote something about those here) and it's all free. In order to run MapTool in an ...


5

I wouldn't go as far as to call myself a medieval scholar but it's a period of history that I know reasonably well. If I was going to be playing a Templar in this period my first step would be to get the relevant Osprey book, in this case Knight Templar 1120 - 1312. This should give you a solid grounding in what the Templars were, their history and their ...


5

I'd suggest looking at any exploration-based futuristic game you happen to have copies of, but obviously that's a dead end for you or you wouldn't be asking these questions. One system that has a good summary for planets or systems is Stars Without Number, of which you can get a free pdf download containing useful sector and planet summary sheets near the ...


4

An answer to the question in the title would be Universalis from Ramshead Publishing. Part of play in Universalis involves taking turns making assertions about the game world and campaign to follow, and there's a "stakes" mechanism involved in enforcing those desires.


4

There are two things that you need to implement such a system: a list of activities and their caloric costs per unit time, tailored to the age and weight of the character; and a list of the caloric values of various foods. A ready-made system for roleplaying games doesn't appear to exist, but given the mass of information out there for dieting and ...


4

1) A decent Laser printer. 2) A roll of Con-Tac brand clear non-glare (Home Depot, $8) 3) An inexpensive paper-cutter (WalMart, $15) 4) Good scissors (Fiskars are my preferred; WalMart, $15) 5) Ream of cardstock, Letter size (WalMart, $6) 6) Ream of Legal Paper (WalMart, $6) 7) Ream of Letter paper (WalMart, $4) 8) Package of overhead transparencies for said ...


4

This is a fairly common leader problem. When I played an artificer, I printed out little "here's your buff" cards that'd literally hand to other players. The runepriest is the same way, except worse. Runepriests are considered to be the most complex leaders in the game, and the hardest to optimize. In this situation, I'd make a double-sided card for each ...


4

Have a look at how Wookiepedia organizes planetary info and decide what you want to include or drop out for your notes.


4

I have installed Sk Combat in my phone. It seems very complete and quite easy, but I don't know how practical is at the end (on a phone not very much). I thought you could give it a try, though. It allows you to build 3D scenarios, and add furniture and miniatures, and to move them. It is certainly eye candy. I think it doesn't manage any of the combat ...


3

Pendragon RPG had a supplement Land of Giants that dealt with adventuring in the era of Beowulf. There is a review on RPG.NET of the supplement. The book is out of print, but you can still find used copies. Alternately, if you're not set on hardcopies, you can find the PDF on DriveThruRPG. It's scanned rather than originally formatted for digital, so ...


3

As somebody that primarily plays online, I've found that the most invaluable thing to have is a shared character sheet repository. I personally prefer Mythweavers (it has sheets for Call of Cthulhu, 3.5e, New World of Darkness, and a bunch of others that I don't even play). The other thing that I've kind of spoiled myself with is a copy of a PDF ...


3

Laptops/ipads with Dropbox, Excel/Google Spreadsheets, PDF readers that allow for annotations and heavy reliance on Google search.


3

One approach: Print to PDF [You didn't specify if you really needed it as text... I used to think I did until I discovered this approach.] I customize monsters all the time in the DDI Adventure Tools Monster Builder. Sometimes I just want to level the creature up/down or change the damage expressions to be 1d6 based to speed up my game, though I usually ...


2

Original D&D suggested using the equally ancient Avalon Hill game Outdoor Survival for wilderness treks. I've played Outdoor Survival, and it is just that - you trying to keep your guy alive as he dehydrates and starves in the wilderness. It is equal parts awesome and terrible, but it addresses the question.


2

Context can be important too. Food supplied in archaic settings is usually of far lower calorie density than at the modern supermarket: leaner, tougher meats, parasites, blighted wheat and the like. Old fashioned cooking/prep methods also extract lower share of the calories contained: medieval grist mills extracted maybe 50%, compared to modern 90% whole ...


2

If you can get your hands on a copy of 1st edition AD&D Wilderness Survival Guide, there are some things in that book that deal with food and water needs for adventurers. I seem to recall addressing some of these concerns in Twilight 2000, but I was only ever a casual player of Twilight 2000, so I don't know the rules that well or where to find them.



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