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48

Answers Below are the expected number of steps/rolls to get to 6 coins: Steps To Go From 2 Coins to 6 Coins = 7.52631 Steps To Go From 3 Coins to 6 Coins = 4.25833 Steps To Go From 4 Coins to 6 Coins = 2.45833 Steps To Go From 5 Coins to 6 Coins = 1.125 Solution The best way to solve this problem in general is not Anydice, but with a tool called Markov ...


41

Resistance is a perfectly fine word by itself, so long as you do not end up with other types of resistance (energy resistance, for instance). Willpower would work if your magic is primarily mental, though it's not ideal when better willpower helps you resist explosions. Warding/Wards would work. It implies a physical object doing the protecting, but then ...


39

Average The Skills If he has to use two skills, average the two skills together and then make one roll. In this case, that'd be a single roll to get 50 or below, since he has 50 in both skills (so the average is 50). If he was better at one skill than another, it'd look slightly different. Say he has a 50 in Stonecarving and 25 in Artistry. That makes the ...


36

To sum up: children have same expectations of odds, probabilities, and equity as adults so long as the problem is stated clearly. For best interest capture, make it even odds (along the probabilities of blackjack) as influenced by a player-controlled simple skill minigame per test. However, the problems with Piaget's study do suggest maximal elimination of ...


35

From Sean K Reynolds (After Emailing Him) Absolutely none. At the time the Pathfinder Alpha was being written, I wasn’t an employee at Paizo. I’m not even listed in the credits. The Beta went to print about a month before I started working at Paizo. I’m not listed in the credits for that book, either. When they were working on the final, ...


35

I am not particularly fond of playing one game session and going up a level. That hardly qualifies as "earned," to my way of thinking. (E. Gary Gygax as Col_Pladoh on Dragonsfoot forum) The above quote was posted 30+ years after the original rules were printed. It supports "designer intent" in this answer. Introduction For a point closer in time to the ...


31

According to third edition designer Skip Williams, in his article Attacks of Opportunity (Part One), D&D uses attacks of opportunity to add tactical complexity and danger, to discourage certain actions in combat without banning them outright, and to balance out useful or powerful combat manoevers: Skip Williams: The D&D game uses its attack ...


31

The caller is an archaic role that is only relevant when the play group is very large. And by very large, I don't mean six or eight players, I mean ten or sixteen. Our sense of what a "large" group is has adjusted drastically downward since BD&D was written, and consequently the purpose and utility of a caller is no longer obvious. The gameplay ...


30

No, this isn't novel (although that does not mean that it isn't clever design in Numenera). There are two separate things married in that mechanic as you've described it. Both have been done before, and I can think of at least one game that has married them in the same way before. First there is the concept of a pull mechanic. Most GM-initiated events are ...


29

Betrayal is achieved through imperfect information, possibly conflicting goals, and the ability for orders to be miscommunicated. (Caution, game theory ahead) Literature Review I'm going to assume that you're familiar with the Prisoner's Dilemma, the iterated prisoner's dilemma, the stag hunt, (Kuhn 2009) and the problems with resource availability on ...


28

Dungeon World is an odd beast. If looked at through the lens of existing D&D experience, it doesn't look like anything different, and lots of its differences seem stupid. To really appreciate what it does differently you have to spend some time immersing your brain in it. I'm a veteran, but I still keep learning new things about the game—it's like ...


27

Try this one: every PC has one chit representing a "+1" bonus to any roll. They can only use it once for session, and they can only use it to influence some other PC's roll. Make it a +2 if the Player can come up with a reasonable explanation. E.g.: I cover him with suppressive fire while he sprints toward the enemy (+1/+2 to dodge) While she tells her ...


25

In these three Legend Lore articles Mike Mearls talks about the fact a major design goal of D&D 5e is to Unite the editions.Specifically allowing the core game to be modified to play similarly to one of the past editions of D&D. Uniting the Editions Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 While not all mechanics were carried forward from past editions, vancian ...


25

Mike Mearls stated on Twitter: for sorcerer, we avoid more complex spells. Sorcerer magic is simpler, more direct See: http://www.sageadvice.eu/2015/08/22/sorcerer-vs-wizard-spell-list/ The spells you mentioned are more "utility" spells - they have an effect that is not immediate or that can be used in ways that might not seem apparent. Sorcerers ...


24

Dungeon World is a narrative game, at it's core, that distinguishes itself from D&D in the way it tells stories. The innovations are in the core philosophies and mechanics. Let me address each of your points in turn: Moves as Powers Moves are NOT just powers. Many are closer to D&D's feats. Others have no mechanical effect at all. Some simply tell ...


24

The analysis of the purpose and substance of the change from 4e to 5e that inspired this question is inaccurate. Before 4th edition there was 3rd edition, and before that 2nd and 1st, and before those there were at least two other editions (maybe more) that don't neatly fit into the numbering scheme. In all except 4e, combat was more loosely defined. In the ...


24

"Forgeite" refers to users and game designers who frequented and followed design theories of a site known as "The Forge," found at http://www.indie-rpgs.com [Internet Archive link]. While the site is now defunct, it had a profound effect on game design and theory among independent game designers, with two of the the most notable being D. Vincent Baker (Dogs ...


23

You don't. You just roll one d100. As you understand, rolling multiple dice is a useful tool for achieving different result spreads. But rolling multiple dice is a tool with a time and place for when you want various advantages: you can take highest or lowest, you can create a bell curve effect, or do other interesting things. However, you're not ...


22

This appears to be a result of the races they selected and largely coincidental, not because of an intentional design choice that having a race with a +2 wis mod would be game breaking. The two bits of evidence I'd point to is that though wisdom spell casting is special (in that Wis casters, namely Cleric and Druid, generally don't have spell books and have ...


21

The player problem that rules changes seem to handle really well is boredom. If combat drags on and on, or if you have two players who are really interested in setting up elaborate tactics on the battemap and one who just wants to roll the dice and move on, then changing the rules to better suit the group as a whole can help. Another thing rules can have a ...


21

The best game with a system for party cohesion I've seen is Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay's 3rd Edition. As part of character creation, the players collectively select a 'Party Sheet' that describes the nature of their party. A number of different party sheets (such as 'Swords for Hire' or 'Servants of Justice') are included in the rule set, each with their ...


21

I would argue that "mechanical character advancement" isn't necessary, but advancement as a whole is. Non-mechanical Character Advancement could fill this need. This could be accomplished not with dice and stats, but with abilities granted as plot points, character development by the player and the GM (GM's acknowledging character development is very ...


21

Your starting assertion is wrong. Ability scores actually are used for a number of things in Third Edition that are not entirely trivial to replace with modifiers. In very rough order of importance: Ability damage from poisons and such-like would be twice as dangerous if it simply attacked modifiers at the same rate, and given the usually small dice ...


20

D&D 4e has Skill Challenges whereby the group has to succeed at multiple skill checks (the number depending on the difficulty) before accumulating 3 failures. The choice of skills boils down to whatever the players can justify. The Essentials red box (spoilers ahead!) has a nice example in the prewritten adventure "Talking to the Dragon" which gives ...


20

Rules = Objects in Setting Let's imagine a roleplaying game where the rules are represented by some physical objects in the gameworld. So let's say you don't like the rule that dwarves can't learn magic? This rule is a stone pillar a hundred feet tall, standing in the Valley of Orblag. Topple it, and the rule will no longer exist. The pillar of No ...


20

I'm assuming that by "big huge robots" you're talking about Gundam/Mech -style "I'm bigger than a house!" robots, as opposed to "powered-armor" a la Starship Troopers (although there's some overlap between the two). The first thing you need to decide, is what you want the focus of your game to be. I can think of a few examples: Focus on in-mech ...


19

DFRPG has more mechanics, which each individually accomplish less. DFRPG is a lot crunchier. Although it maintains the "players can make up their own setting and features" ethos that is the hallmark of Fate, it has a LOT of subsystems in which to do this. For example, it provides a solid and complicated magic subsystem. You're free to make up your own ...


19

The first and third points aren’t really big deals; actually, the third point would be a disadvantage of save-or-dies. Would be, if the numbers were more reasonable. By the numbers: you can probably make someone fail a saving throw Ultimately, caster classes have every reason to pump their save DCs as much as they can. The ability score that sets the ...


18

Medical practice as we now thing of it was not extant until the 17th Century; the various providers of medical treatment included a variety of individuals with various titles. Some of the trends Laech, Physicker, Leech: Generally, a practitioner of Roman medicine. Leaches, salves, ointments, unguents, and caurterization, perhaps some stitching of ...


18

The single most important thing you can learn from outside blind playtesters: Is it intelligible? There are two very good "blind test" modes: hand the playtest GM the rules, and have him run a group of players and report hand the playtest GM the rules, and, never once answering a rules question, play in his game with his players. Mode 1 is less ...



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