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4

They're not. To address the question in the title: neither in Mage 2nd Edition, Mage Revised, Guide to the Technocracy, nor Mage: 20th Anniversary Edition does the background Talisman (or Wonder, or Device) cost double to acquire. As a result, the reference you're quoting in GttT was likely an error at the time that was corrected in the most recent edition, ...


5

As of Mage 20th Anniversary Edition—which should probably supersede the pre-Revised Guide to the Technocracy—the double cost only exists for Enhancements but not Wonders (Devices/Fetishes/Talismans). There's only a throwaway line as to why. Thanks to its powerful effects and unusual properties, the Enhancements Trait is more expensive than usual. This ...


1

I would say take a look at online gaming pages.Most of them have the aility for you to say "I search for a custom system" and then put that its a playtest either in the title or the body. Or they have a forum where you can say that you seek ppl for that and ask if they are interested and then give them the link to that game. Also most of these have the ...


5

You need to start marketing your game now, and I don't mean full color ads or quoting print runs. You got to get people talking and engaged with your game. Fortunately, the internet is your friend. Set up a blog devoted to your game (and genre). Post daily, and respond. Take awesome questions from other sites and answer them on yours. Hook your blog up to ...


21

Your starting assertion is wrong. Ability scores actually are used for a number of things in Third Edition that are not entirely trivial to replace with modifiers. In very rough order of importance: Ability damage from poisons and such-like would be twice as dangerous if it simply attacked modifiers at the same rate, and given the usually small dice ...


5

The "Holmes" blue book spells it out pretty clearly that the one-level-at-a-time rule is a hard limit to the lopsided experience point awards that would be awarded in "special circumstances" where a single character could gain experience that had been "earned" by the whole party. In early D&D, rules for awarding experience could result in some very ...


26

I am not particularly fond of playing one game session and going up a level. That hardly qualifies as "earned," to my way of thinking. (E. Gary Gygax as Col_Pladoh on Dragonsfoot forum) The above quote was posted 30+ years after the original rules were printed. It supports "designer intent" in this answer. Introduction For a point closer in time to the ...


-4

The reason for one level at a time is to keep some level of realism in the game. you gain XP for experience, hence the name. When a character levels up, he/ she is becoming a more advanced fighter, spell-caster ect. This process would take time as well as experience (not points but actual experience). Not only does the character have new abilities, they have ...



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