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3

I'm not sure this answer is exactly what you were expecting, but the question has got none yet. So I'll take a risk to make use of your exact wording "any D&D" (though you may have meant "any designers"). From AD&D 2E DMG: Damaging Equipment For the most part, specific damage isn't applied to equipment under the AD&D rules. This doesn't ...


2

the Final Fantasy series sometimes uses the term Barrier for this. Abjuration perhaps from the D&D school of protective magic? Negation or any of it's synonyms? the IRL technical term for something that is meant to deflect magic, spirits and misfortune is Apotropaic: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apotropaic_magic Of everything that's already been ...


2

Being an old WoW player, I prefer Resilience and think of it as a term for "Reducing non-physical damage." So whether the player gets hit by a fireball or falls into a campfire, they wouldn't take as much damage as they normally would, though both would still hurt plenty. Total Damage = Rolled Damage - Resilience Noting above, Resistance is an ...


3

MR is a fantastic abbreviation for Magic Resistance. It's what League of Legends players use.


15

A One-word term for Magical Resistance is a bit hard. Most RPG and MMO players are fairly used to composite terms for something like that, the two most common being Magical Resistance and Magical Armor. Those are frequently abbreviated to MR and MA, respectively, which is what commonly appears on character sheets. M. Resistance and M. Armor are also pretty ...


41

Resistance is a perfectly fine word by itself, so long as you do not end up with other types of resistance (energy resistance, for instance). Willpower would work if your magic is primarily mental, though it's not ideal when better willpower helps you resist explosions. Warding/Wards would work. It implies a physical object doing the protecting, but then ...


8

The designers put their reasoning right in the DM Guide. Experience Points are now optional to help make the game work with more styles of play. [Doing] away with experience points entirely...can be particularly helpful if your campaign doesn't include much combat, or includes so much combat the tracking XP becomes tiresome. (DM Guide, page 261) ...


4

It's not a complete answer, but according to Mike Mearls (head of the D&D 5 R&D team) I don't track XP. I let the PCs level up after every other session or at the end of each key adventure. (From a Reddit AMA with Mike Mearls) That may give you some small insight to the designers thoughts on the matter.



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