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19

They are publishing much less new World of Darkness than they used to during the old World of Darkness, but it's not necessarily piracy that is causing the change. They are currently owned by CCP (the company behind Eve Online) and involved in creating the World of Darkness MMO. There has been an economic slowdown in the last 5-6 years, reducing the amount ...


16

Making a living in the RPG industry really depends on your definition of making a living. I think there is a lot of potential to make money, but it will likely require a lot of work for not much of an income compared to more lucrative careers that take a great deal of effort. When I think of what you've asked, I think of individuals like Jason Calacanis or ...


16

Fantasy Flight Games is pleased to announce that it has entered a comprehensive licensing partnership with Lucasfilm Ltd. for the worldwide rights to publish card, roleplaying, and miniatures games set in the popular Star Wars universe! Source: StarWars.com (August 2, 2011)


16

Monte actually had very little to say about 4e other than that he didn't like its licensing. However, you can guess what he doesn't like about it from his comments on 3e, 3.5, and game design in general. Practically Mandatory Miniatures Monte on 3.5 (from here): The game has an even stronger focus on miniatures. 3.0 had a strong focus on miniatures, ...


14

@Okeefe has already mentioned Onyx Path Publishing, which is comprised of former WW employees and has the license to produce both oWoD and nWoD books. They've got a full release schedule coming up, including two brand-new games and revisions of World of Darkness and Vampire: The Requiem. It's not accurate to say that they're no longer producing new work. ...


13

No, we don't have evidence about the whole industry, let alone specific data on revenue that would give us the ability to extrapolate to the effects on the whole industry, because too few companies share the kinds of sales information necessary to do such a wide-scale analysis. There are anecdotes aplenty about how digital effects individual companies, but ...


12

There are still many publishers that come out with a lot of adventure support for their games. WotC doesn't, but that's just been a pet problem of theirs for a long time. They believed it did not pay off for them (maybe it didn't because of their large corporate overhead) and they spread that idea through the industry. And of course little guys barely get a ...


10

It's nothing to do with piracy. White Wolf's focus has moved to MMOs and is less on RPGs now (like at many companies, sadly). And they are doing less print publishing and more PDF - which is always going to be less successful regardless of piracy, given that the average gamer still buys books. If piracy was their big problem, you'd think they'd move to print ...


10

That White Wolf stopped publishing has less to do with piracy and more to do with the fact that White Wolf's parent company, CCP, considers tabletop games and White Wolf to be legacy businesses with respect to MMOs. Some new things are happening, though. They've embraced pdf sales and print on demand. There's a licensed company, Onyx Path Publishing, that's ...


9

To look at why Adventures are less prominent now Adventures are a hard item to write well... good adventures: have to be suitable for a wide range of characters have to have alternate paths in case of player failure or diversion have to be written exceptionally clearly need targeted art done specific for the adventure (stock art won't do for maps...) ...


6

Well, I think it's fair to say Monte hasn't been an outspoken 4e hater, he's written little explicitly on the topic. He did say on his blog that he didn't plan to do any work in 4e with his company Malhavoc partly because he wasn't all that into 4e but more so because of the GSL licensing: And in case you were wondering, don't expect any 4E-compatible ...


6

The Pathfinder RPG from Paizo (a system based on D&D 3.5, but with updated rules, and a setting information, so depending on your players reasons for "no d&d" may be no good, or may be fine) has many, many published adventures, typically organised into adventure paths, and intended to be run one after the other to form a complete campaign arc.


6

Beyond working as a writer, publisher, or artist, consider child care. I heard of at least one mom paying DMs for educational roleplaying with her kid. See Roleplaying games as a teaching tool. I also heard of a woman running a businness selling roleplaying for a summer program. See Abantey, the Roleplay Workshop. I also heard of at least one person who ...


5

I have a friend who is a professional roleplayer. He is hired by companies to help assess potential employees and train existing ones by taking on various job-related roles - the irate customer, the uncommunicative co-worker, the shy patient, whatever is called for. his background is in acting and he does OK. If your friend has the necessary skills and ...


5

As someone who's been slowly working up into distribution, I question the premise here. The collapse of Wizard's Attic was absolutely a disruptive, destructive event, but that was more because it hurt the individual publishers who got caught in the blast than because of its impact on distribution in general. From where I stand, distro is doing ok, or at ...


4

Mongoose Publishing's Matthew Sprang claimed he approached Lucasfilm, looking to obtain a license for a Star Wars Roleplaying Game; He was apparently told that someone else already has the license. Most major companies have denied having the license. The following have said it isn't them: Far Future Enterprises Steve Jackson Games Eden Studios Margaret ...


4

For the most part game companies have stopped publishing adventures as only one person in each gaming group typically buys them. Wizards of the Coast mentioned this about the time 4e came out when people asked about that. Steve Jackson games states on one of their web pages that electronic publishing is the only way to put out adventures profitably. Player ...


4

I don't think there's a great deal of published, general information on this topic. Among podcast listeners, there's an annual survey that includes what games listeners are playing. Informally, I would assume that RPG podcast listeners probably play a broader range of RPGs than the gaming population as a whole. Jennisodes has a discussion of the survey ...


3

Disclaimer: I am a featured reviewer at DriveThruRPG. Yes and No Yes, digital sales hurt print vendors, such as bookshops. On the other hand, however, they're not hurting the industry of gaming. Admittedly, one could argue that some of the practices are perhaps a little sketchy (Catalyst putting out fifteen guns or drones or vehicles for Shadowrun every ...


3

I think the "answer" lies in the middle ground, with efforts like Bits and Mortar, which incentivizes retailers to deal directly with publishers and adds value for physical retail customers. If you are asking whether there is a place for traditional distributors in the future, I am thinking not. Aggregators, fulfillment houses, yes. People who warehouse ...


2

You become a writer for tabletop RPGs by: doing it whenever you can; write a log, write for fanzines like Fight On!, write adventures or classes or other material and make them freely available looking out for open calls for freelancers, sending queries to magazines like Kobold Quarterly, watching the Wizards of the Coast job boards for jobs in design (I ...


2

Practically speaking, it's a service job, but it's a tricky one. Let's say you've got five players on average, and a game session lasts four hours. Your hourly rate ought to be at least $15 an hour, so you're looking for $60, or $12 from each of them. OK. How does that compare to how much people currently pay to game? A convention slot will run somewhere ...


2

Personally, I'm all for abolishing the dead tree distribution of roleplaying materials. It doesn't make sense for how often they need to be referenced, and it adds a barrier to entry for new-comers to the hobby. The artwork neccessary for print books and so on, whilst it does make them look pretty, creates two artificial barriers for our hobby. 1) It ...


2

To answer the question why the industry doesn't publish terribly many adventures (in ratio to other supplements/core books) is because adventures just don't sell as well. Whereas the corebook has a decent chance of being bought by every player in the game (or at least most) an adventure is only going to be bought by two subgroups: DM's (who be their nature ...


2

Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition has a huge backlog of adventures available via their Dungeon digital magazine. However, you must subscribe to Dungeons & Dragons Insider to access this content. Also, if your group doesn't want to play D&D because you thought 3rd Edition was too complex, you realize that means you are the target audience for 4E, ...


2

As others have indicated, there really are no solid industry-wide figures. While Wizards of the Coast seems to have a conflicted relationship with PDFs, smaller players have embraced them. You can mine these reports for information: Posthuman Studios: Their 2010 Year End Review goes through their numbers, which I've summarized in this blog post. Not only ...


1

The best information you can get about this is from publishers themselves. Many of them run both print and PDF product lines. I recall, but cannot now find a publisher discussing the cost-analysis of when to have a product go from print to PDF and when to release a niche product directly to PDF. It is by no means simple and of course entirely up to the ...


1

There's nothing wrong with the publishing of books There's everything wrong with your flgs, flgs aren't moving stock because generally if its a big game, its cheaper to get it on the net (and I'm talking about amazon here, not piracy) and if its a small game, its cheaper not to bother carrying it for both the flgs and the creator). Flgs used to work as ...


1

At the moment, the biggest tool in maintaining dead-tree distribution is supporting the local games stores by buying the product. When you buy from the LGS, they buy from their distributor, and the distributor from the publisher. Some, however, are starting to bypass the distributor, and some publishers are supporting this by giving the same discount as the ...



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