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18

"My character would do that" should never be used as a "justification" (more likely excuse) for game-wrecking behaviour. It's not a simulation, it's a game. Everybody wants to have fun. One thing is doing something that will make the in-game situation difficult while still providing a positive gaming experience. But good role-playing should never lead to a ...


13

without which material your game won't feel authentic, just a bad copy, an alternate universe of an alternate universe. I started writing an answer about how to narrow down and use a small, immediate bit of setting to get a small, immediate situation, and I came back and read this part again. That's your problem. You have a strong commitment to ...


12

Short answer is start from the bottom and advance upward. That is instead of jumping into a massive open sandbox campaign from the start you set the game in a very small and narrow sub setting. Now I don't know Shadowrun but if I'm allowed to use Forgotten Realms as an example that too is a huge and massive world with lots of information. However, if you ...


12

Not Very The cold truth of planning is that you will plan things that don't get used. That's just how it goes. How much of your planning goes to waste depends on how far out you try to plan. The trick I use is to divide my planning up into higher level ideas, and low level details (like stats). High Level - Far Out If your campaign has an overarching ...


7

When I am overloaded with too much setting material, I head online instead. Normally in the various play by post forums, or other forums and wiki articles online, I'll be able to find a summary of the important information. Here is what I look for when skimming: Adventure introductions in PbP game advertisements such as those on Myth-Weavers. These ...


7

I'm currently struggling with this because I'm getting into Glorantha, which is one of the Big Three settings (Tékumel and Hârn are the other two). The Big Three dwarf even settings typically considered huge, like the Forgotten Realms, and it's daunting to try to figure out how to eat this aircraft carrier, let alone how to prepare some of its most choice ...


5

If played as designed, 4e has strong assumptions on group coherency. This means the party needs to regroup no matter what, and running a challenge where both failing and succeeding lead to the same result means running an useless challenge. Apart from the fact @gatherer818 mentioned about this being a precedent for forcing a fellow player to behave like ...


5

When I use heavily developed RPG settings like Shadowrun and the Forgotten Realms, I deal with setting fidelity in a couple of ways. Use an underdeveloped part of the setting Even the richest, novel-laden settings have thin spots. Some regions just aren’t detailed as well as others. Some parts of the metaplot lie fallow for ages. Often, all you need to do ...


4

Dungeon World performs excellently with conflict in the open, either visible only to the players/audience, or also visible to the characters. (In Dungeon World, metagaming is often OK or even encouraged, since acting on metagame information must still go through the fiction and moves, which adds to the dynamism of the game; and often metagaming will spark ...


4

New answer for a renewed question. The old one is here I'd say that a hidden move is quite against the grain of *World games'idea of moves. It robs the players of their agency in determining their characters' story. And in your case, the intra-party conflict that may occur if the infiltrator is exposed seems to be more important than whether the ...


3

We have a saying in the software industry. (One that seems to be less and less heeded as the years go by, but I digress). It's called "YAGNI": "You ain't gonna need it." What this means is that by sheer scope of the setting, you have to start with the bits that are the most relevant to your PCs and work outward. This is especially true with a setting ...


2

You have expressed two conflicting goals. In a comment: you want to be as authentic as possible in the question: read through it (quickly, because gaming night is upon you) You would not expect to be able to write a historical novel set in the court of King Edward IV of England that is "as authentic as possible" with a quick skim of a history ...


2

All editions of Dungeons & Dragons differ in how much damage characters and monsters do, and how many hit points they have. In 5th edition characters and monsters have the highest damage output of any edition, for example this is the only edition in which a level 1 wizard with a magic missile does 3d4+3 damage, in all previous editions it was less. But ...


2

Firstly, if you can you should wait for the conversion guides which will be free. If however you are anxious I suggest the following pointers. Replace all monsters from the old module with monsters from the DM basic rules. Same with common magic items. Use the xp budget guidelines to reduce or increase the number of monsters, though normally you can keep ...


2

Most D&D games have a basic assumption that the party just stays together, and that pretty much everything else bends to fit that. This shows up in the "PC aura" trope when a new player is joining the group: there may be an introduction scene and everyone pretends to have suspicions and different motives and so on, but the conclusion is foregone and ...


1

There is nothing wrong with railroads when you need a railroad. They have their uses, such as letting trains get from A to B without crashing. If you ever, as a DM, find yourself in a situation where the result of a dice roll will decide if your group has a fun evening or not, then find some reason why you should roll it, and cheat. Claim that all ...



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