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38

Let the Baby Bird Leave the Nest Having rotated a campaign through many GM hands, the least disruptive thing we found was to not worry about it. Your turn at the helm is over. Our group has multiple people that like to GM. We created a world we really liked and want to continue exploring when it is someone else's turn to run a campaign. We decided that ...


16

You start with a pithy campaign concept pitch ("Con artists in a Star Wars 'verse"). Then the players make trimmed-down PCs: a High Concept, a Trouble, and two or three skills with ranks assigned. Everything else can be filled in on the fly during play as it's needed/wanted. As they make their characters, the players should decide what small goal they share ...


15

without which material your game won't feel authentic, just a bad copy, an alternate universe of an alternate universe. I started writing an answer about how to narrow down and use a small, immediate bit of setting to get a small, immediate situation, and I came back and read this part again. That's your problem. You have a strong commitment to ...


15

Using The Lost Mines of Phandelver as an example, here's how I handle such situations. Map I frequently forget elements when going off published maps. So I take the published map, photocopy it, and mark it in a way that makes the key elements of each room impossible for me to miss. For example, if the room is dark, I outline the shape of the room using a ...


13

Short answer is start from the bottom and advance upward. That is instead of jumping into a massive open sandbox campaign from the start you set the game in a very small and narrow sub setting. Now I don't know Shadowrun but if I'm allowed to use Forgotten Realms as an example that too is a huge and massive world with lots of information. However, if you ...


13

Not Very The cold truth of planning is that you will plan things that don't get used. That's just how it goes. How much of your planning goes to waste depends on how far out you try to plan. The trick I use is to divide my planning up into higher level ideas, and low level details (like stats). High Level - Far Out If your campaign has an overarching ...


13

Get a look at this tables I found and use on my games, it have all the necessary in 3 pages landscape that you can fit to your custom-made DM screen. All the credit for Mr. Stan Shinn, great work! http://swshinn.com/dnd-5e/rules-summary/ You can also use the DnD Free official rules as is very cheap to print and you have a simple booklet easy to use and ...


12

You've said it yourself: Go with the fiction If they decide they need to camp for a night then sure, ask them to mark off rations and decide their watch order. If they're spending the night in an inn and pay for food and lodgings (or earn them through heroic deeds), why would they consume rations or have to take watch? If they're in a situation where ...


12

Here are the rules: Starvation and Thirst Characters might find themselves without food or water and with no means to obtain them. In normal climates, Medium characters need at least a gallon of fluids and about a pound of decent food per day to avoid starvation. (Small characters need half as much.) In very hot climates, characters need two or three ...


10

New answer for a renewed question. The old one is here I'd say that a hidden move is quite against the grain of *World games'idea of moves. It robs the players of their agency in determining their characters' story. And in your case, the intra-party conflict that may occur if the infiltrator is exposed seems to be more important than whether the ...


10

I once played in a Low Life one-shot (written for Savage Worlds Revised, the version out at the time of printing) but used Savage Worlds Deluxe and there were no issues whatsoever, even when incorporating new rules (e.g. the new chase rules, new Incapacitation rules, the Rapid Attack combat maneuver). There are just a couple of tweaks you have to make ...


10

Playing short form requires several shifts in technique and approach. My group typically does 2-3 hour sessions. A 4 hour session is a marathon for us. Drop the Filler The first thing to do is let go of filler material. Filler material includes setting up adventures that are "clue to clue to clue to oh actually interesting development". This is the ...


9

I'm currently struggling with this because I'm getting into Glorantha, which is one of the Big Three settings (Tékumel and Hârn are the other two). The Big Three dwarf even settings typically considered huge, like the Forgotten Realms, and it's daunting to try to figure out how to eat this aircraft carrier, let alone how to prepare some of its most choice ...


8

Firstly, if you can you should wait for the conversion guides which will be free. If however you are anxious I suggest the following pointers. Replace all monsters from the old module with monsters from the DM basic rules. Same with common magic items. Use the xp budget guidelines to reduce or increase the number of monsters, though normally you can keep ...


7

SlyFlourish, producer of several books and tips for DM, noted that at level 1 it was a deadly grind. It might be intentional but I didn't like it that way so I've up-leveled or made them level 2 very quickly. It was a grind at level 2 but a GOOD grind. At level 1 it's deadly. Twitter Source With that in mind, consider leveling them up right away, ...


7

Dungeon World performs excellently with conflict in the open, either visible only to the players/audience, or also visible to the characters. (In Dungeon World, metagaming is often OK or even encouraged, since acting on metagame information must still go through the fiction and moves, which adds to the dynamism of the game; and often metagaming will spark ...


7

When I am overloaded with too much setting material, I head online instead. Normally in the various play by post forums, or other forums and wiki articles online, I'll be able to find a summary of the important information. Here is what I look for when skimming: Adventure introductions in PbP game advertisements such as those on Myth-Weavers. These ...


7

Method A: Do your research. When you are not an expert, you have to become one. According to the wiki rule, there is a specialized wiki for about every fictional universe ever imagined just a web search away. For Star Wars in particular, there is for example Wookiepedia where you can look up lots of trivia about Dantooine or Tatooine. When you have the ...


7

That kind of decay is probably best represented by ability damage. He's not "technically" starving, but he's not eating well enough to really support him, right? Poor health = Constitution damage; physical weakness = Strength damage; broken will = Wisdom damage. You could add others too, if you wanted. If he's forgotten how to deal with people like ...


6

There's a bunch on SoundBible: http://soundbible.com/tags-zombie.html AudioBlocks also has some nice ones, and the site shows you a graph of each clip: http://www.audioblocks.com/search/?srch-term=zombie&srch-type=sfx I'd also recommend checking out the "horror sounds", which includes various ambient sound effects popular in horror films, and a few ...


6

D&D5 has only 3 levels: Dark, Dim or Light. In the absence of a light source it's Dark - take this as the default state for underground and nighttime. Start with everywhere is dark; If you are in the dark you are effectively blinded. To remember: Write "Dark" prominently on the map. To make an area Light you need a light source, blindsight or ...


6

If you use miniatures If you use miniatures, it might be useful to get some kind of small ring (like, cut out top of a cottage cheese or margarine container, leave just the rim) that you can place down around the light sources. Obviously: a) it's not exact, and b) you need to find something a close size for the actual light to your map, but it can serve as ...


6

Since you have "fairly extensive" written session notes, I would apply the principle that especially in a "make it up as you go along" campaign, if the players didn't see it then it wasn't real. Unless the new GM wants to know what you were thinking. There is no such thing as "something he doesn't really know about". There are things that have been defined ...


5

When I use heavily developed RPG settings like Shadowrun and the Forgotten Realms, I deal with setting fidelity in a couple of ways. Use an underdeveloped part of the setting Even the richest, novel-laden settings have thin spots. Some regions just aren’t detailed as well as others. Some parts of the metaplot lie fallow for ages. Often, all you need to do ...


5

I have organized 5 LARP events of around 3-4 days length with 80-120 people each over the last years. The camp was set up in the style of a boy scout camp, i.e. tents etc. I just listed some points off the top of my head... Feel free to ask me anything I have not answered below. Kind of event Figure out what kind of event you want to do. The span goes ...


5

There are guidelines for increasing the difficulty of an encounter. Basically, you calculate the XP budget for 6 characters. So instead of 100 XP for an easy encounter at L1, the XP budget is 150. However I would not do anything at all with the encounters at first. Wait until your PCs are consistently breezing through them. Most groups need some time to ...


5

I have a similar problem, if not for similar reasons. The software that I utilize to solve it is The Keep, by NBOS. It's a bit pricey, which made me take while to get it, and it does have a certain idea in mind of how it wants you to keep track of information- but if you can adapt, it works well. First, from their blurb: Key Features: Organize ...


5

There is no "should" here. Cheat sheets are typically made one of two ways: A game designer makes educated guesses based on their inside knowledge, and arranges that material on an officially-published GM Screen product or download. Despite officialness, these are often not ideal, as limited designer time, graphic design considerations, and marketing ...


4

I would add monsters until you are inline with the XP restrictions set forth on page 57 of the Basic DM Guide For example, with 4 people, the initial encounter of 8 kobolds is 500xp, or 25 XP * 8 kobolds * 2.5 for a group of 8. As a result, this encounter is pretty deadly at level 1. That said, the players should be helped out by the woman with the spear, ...


4

Having been running the Encounters version... You need a Cleric or a Paladin in the party. Bards simply don't have the ability to magically heal, and that is what's needed. Potions don't make up for the lack of magical healing. 0HP does not equal dead. If you're not running Adventurer's League play, then you can let them level up once they get 300 XP... ...



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