New answers tagged

1

For those particular tokens, I use a three-pronged approach, one method for each size of token (1", 2", and 3" circles). 1" tokens - Stored in film canisters, labelled alphabetically (using small blank stickers), themselves stored in a 4L really useful box with a 9L sorting tray (trust me - that works). 2" tokens - Stored in two of the smaller compartments ...


0

You haven't included a lot of specifics on what the item is or how one character got overpowered, so my answer will be pretty general as well. In general, one OP character is not going to steamroll an adventure, and even an OP character will have weaknesses. If the cleric can heal big huge chunks of damage but doesn't keep AoE heals, swap some single ...


5

Dungeon World works great for smaller groups (Though it probably wouldn't be as much fun with just one player.) for exactly the reasons you cite. Things tend to happen reactively - monsters don't, strictly speaking, get "turns", but rather, act when a PC rolls badly or doesn't act to stop them. Similarly, the game isn't nearly as 'party synergy dependent' ...


0

I have also missed that in Strands of Fate. In general though in Fate-based systems the most determining characteristic is the value of the top skill. Typically players have a skill pyramid with a fix max value and that often goes for monsters as well. If the max skill of a monster is equal of the players one can assume that it will be quite effective in ...


5

Run one-shot games that improve your group’s roleplaying skills A lot of high quality, cheap (or free) independent / one-shot RPGs require little or no preparation time, and the rules can be learned together within an hour. These games typically last one or two sessions and can convey techniques and skills which will be of benefit to your main campaign. In ...


4

The trope of a contract that hides some nasty surprises behind a maze of clauses, conditions, legalese, and loopholes is a time-honored one So is the one of a maddeningly simple "contract" which becomes a nasty surprise or series of them because of things the other party isn't aware of or can't see at the time they signed it. Think about Faerie shenanigans ...


5

Perhaps you can try out GMless games. Fiasco is a great example. No prep, fast action, bad things happening all over the place. Cheat your own Adventure also has no prep. It's whole style is based off of those silly/goofy/awesome choose your own adventure books.


7

As a fellow DM that has a twice a week schedule where I can run a game (more because it is hard for me to find free time every week than the prep time) I can feel for you and your group. My whole group wants me to run a weekly game instead, but that's difficult for various reasons. The problem you are stating is that you do not have the time to prep ...


2

Random Encounter Tables You may consider simply putting together some random encounter tables and having the party run into something random in any given week. It takes only minor preparation as there are many tables out there, and all you would need to do is figure out how to play the given 'monster(s) of the week'. Obviously, the encounter will not be as ...


4

Expand the Current Process Legal labyrinths are fun, but the more realism involved, the more games get bogged down. Perhaps, rather than representing the process with a single roll, a series of rolls would suffice. These checks would be built in such a way as to reveal progressively more about the risks involved with the contract. Some skills, such as ...


6

If you have time to spend on this, you can ask the players to write the contract themselves. As neither your players nor their characters are in-real-life lawyers you can bet there will be plenty of loopholes the devil will be able to exploit. They can make checks if they want, and it could give them clues like "you mentioned you didn't want you soul to be ...


19

If the minutiae of labyrinthine legalese doesn't sound like fun to you, and it doesn't sound like fun to the players, then don't use it. Your player is right -- it's not fair to agree to a contract without getting to hear the details. Instead, offer deals that are tempting, but dangerous. Let's say the party has a question for Mr. Mephistopheles -- they ...


-3

Have the player make the check like you did, only this time its a secret check. Then you give the player information based on what they have deduced much like a knowledge check for a monster. The better the check, the better an understanding of it you have. Let some of the contracts have something very tricky in it to produce a higher DC as well for those ...



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