New answers tagged

1

Depending on the system at hand, it's likely to be possible to run the game without the players interacting with the rules at all. Most RPGs work perfectly well with the players conveying their intent to the GM in natural language, the GM handling the required mechanics, and then using natural language to respond, all with the players needing no knowledge ...


1

First off, don't worry, I think every other novice group starts out much as you describe. The quick answer is, just "find the fun." Teach as much of the rules as you like, until you or somebody gets tired of it. Some players will be happy for you to read the rules to them, especially if you're good at reading out loud. Others will get sick of it quickly. ...


1

When you introduce new players to a new game (even if those players are experienced with other games), I have been using a few rules, that from the last 15 years I've been DMing, has been proved successful. 1) Start with pre-generated characters. This have some major advantages. First, you are sure the characters will fit in the setting, and that they will ...


2

One thing I try to do when introducing new players is the following: (for context) This is based off an ability you can buy in the Nobilis RPG for your Imperator (read: Patron God). Basically, your Imperator is so "in tune" with the universe, you get a weird "should I do that?" feeling before doing something dangerous/risky/stupid. NOTE: this doesn't stop ...


-1

Play the setting you want, but use SimpleD6, Crab Truckers, or some other simplified generalized ruleset.


1

For new players, stick to the basics Character creation: if they are new, coach them through it but focus on creation and their idea rather than optimization. If they have played before, all they need is the basics for a given game. All you need to offer is any limits you have. Lore: let it unfold as the game goes on. Very basic lore about where they ...


2

Game Expectations At it's core, this might be a question about different gaming styles and expectations for what a game is like. I've played at entire tables full of people who had never read a core rule book, and never would - that doesn't appeal to them. While you are interested in reading a rule book and diving into the game's mechanics and lists of ...


2

I'm mostly familiar with D&D 5e, so most of my references will be to that game. The principles should be the same though. If your players don't care about the rules, maybe try running lose with the rules. Rules exist in any game to keep it fun for everyone, so strike a balance between "Rules Lawyer" and "I don't care, do whatever you want." For ...


15

Answers in order followed by some discussion: Out the gate you don't need to teach them anything. As they encounter things that require rules, you inform them of them. So when they first want to try scaling a wall you inform them of how skill checks work and have them roll. You introduce the rules of combat piece by piece. Just ask them what they want to ...


4

I will give you just one method that will work for any issue where you need to give information to your players: Use handouts. It may seem silly at first, but that's what I do when I go to events in my town and want to try a new system, which, obviously, nobody know the rules. When it's not a game that comes with a beginner box of some sort (such as ...


4

Different groups have different standards, but generally speaking, all you'll really need is their passive Perception and Defences. You'll be using those a lot, but you can easily ask for anything else you need in play. I've had GMs that ask for a full list of all skills, in case they need to roll secret checks of various kinds, but passive Perception and ...


-3

Unfortunately this is very much based on personal experience and many DMs/GMs will have their own particular methods. There are a number of items though that can help: A copy of the Monster STATs the players will encounter Any specific information the NPCs hold which you want to pass to the players If you are doing a long campaign, the backgrounds of the ...


0

At the Story level: A model I have learned from other GMs is to have a general notion of, "What happens if the PCs do nothing?" Generally, you want this to be both bad, and interesting. Bad, because you want to provoke the players into opposition, and interesting because until your players start taking the bait, you at least want to have noticeable and ...


3

Depends Every DM is different. If you are good on your feet and take naturally to story creation, minimal prep is necessary and you pull almost everything out of the air. I learned I need prep, but too much prep for me leads to me wanting to railroad. So, sketches of what might be rather than what the players will do. For instance, when I was brand new ...


11

There are many tricks that will help you remember, but most of them boil down to two things: Focus on the important stuff and write things down. That being said, here are a few more detailed pieces of advice that might help you. 1: Get rid of clutter I don't know anything about the Death House, but it seems to be a large mansion with a lot of rooms. The ...


6

Let the players' (and your) imagination do the work. While the Devil might be in the details, he's irrelevant here. Paint with big brush strokes. Let the imaginations of the players fill the gaps. And let the players add to the environment! For example: You enter a kitchen, the smell of cold roasted meats and fat permeates the place. Over in a ...


4

The biggest thing that helps me with remembering areas is visual factors. Instead of trying to read it from the book, you could create a simple map, set of dot points of important items, or have a page of "reminders", or even combine all three. Before the session, set out what you want from each area. Are there X amount of key items they need to find? A ...



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