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1

Here is a simple set of rules/guidelines that I follow to make sure my adventures can be played within a time-limit of four to six hours. Divide the adventure into the following three distinct parts Exposition This is the first part. It is where the players familiarize themselves with each other and their surroundings. It ends with the Presentation of ...


2

One idea that occurs to me is that the PCs are staging from some sort of mobile base - one that for some reason must move on at irregular intervals with it's occupants. It does not necessarily have to move far each time it moves, allowing for repeated access to some feature of the world the players/characters are interested in exploring, but the characters ...


1

This sort of structure lends itself well to a "Western Marches" style game. http://nowherecollective.net/2011/09/05/running-a-west-marches-game-links-and-resources/ The basic idea is that you have a safe base and then the players are venturing out into the wilderness. Because it's unsafe out there and there are no shops the players want to return to town ...


7

One simple way for sandboxy games: Explain to the players that they need to get back to base by the end of the session. If they don’t, then you’ll roll on a table you’ve made up to determine what happens on their way back to base.


1

I find when it comes to giving sessions a time limit, nothing beats an actual literal time limit. Each session, set out in that night's story a clear reason for having limited time, set a timer, and run with it. Why the time limit exists should change as often as possible and make sense for the genre. Eclipse Phase: "We have two hours before the life ...


5

So, to add to some already great content, here are my ideas about this topic: Find a reason for them to go back home You should have a very clear reason to send them home at the end of the session, a reason that you should be so familiar with that you'll be able to adjust it to whatever the characters did to your dungeon in each and every session. It may ...


9

Use a dynamic amount of content. You can't know how long that 3 page long dungeon will take to play. Instead prep the games in small chunks. Add more chunks as necessary during the game session. When you're approaching the end point, run the final segment of the game. As requested, here are some examples. I held off from posting them when I first ...


3

If you want a return to base type thing, I suggest giving the players a keep to come back too. Managing the keep will be a nice way to fade the episodes in and out. For your mega-dungeon: suppose the place has some sort of uber-guardian spirit that manifests on intruders at random times. To aviod this, one of the players develops a spell that auto-teleports ...


8

First of all, you need to choose a game that allows you to do that, which comes with the usual implications of making your group buy in. If you already play one of those, no problem. If you don't and your group still wants to use that system, then maybe someone else will write an answer about how to shorten combat encounters and create short missions. This ...


2

I had a group of 4 PCs taken down by two NPCs wielding Power Axes, light armour. One PC named Garret had Power Armor and full health with a man-portable lascannon. I think his BS was 70 and he was famous for taking down several tanks and even War-Walkers. Another time I had a first time player have a demon intrude on his ship the first time he ever entered ...



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