Hot answers tagged

70

Well, I don't think I need to tell you that it's within RAW, per the spell description of Fireball [emphasis mine]: A bright streak flashes from your pointing finger to a point you choose within range then blossoms with a low roar into an explosion of flame. Each creature in a 20-foot radius must make a Dexterity saving throw. A target takes 8d6 fire ...


56

I'm going to make one critical assumption about your gaming group. If it's untrue, I don't know if my answer will be helpful: The friendship of the people at the table is more important than the game you're playing. Going forward I'm assuming you're all friends foremost, and you play games as a form of mutual recreation. Now, on to my answer. TL;DR: This is ...


51

There are so many ways to enjoy roleplaying games that we sometimes — often, actually — forget that fact and just assume that how we play is the way. Unsurprisingly, this results in unpleasant things when different ways to play collide and nobody notices that hey, maybe these are different and don't mix well! What you (personally or as a group) need to do ...


46

This meta-game accuracy is a purposeful feature of using the optional grid rules — that kind of tactical detail is the whole point of using a grid. An obvious alternative that eliminates miniatures-based player precision is to not use the optional grid rules. There's some discussion of imprecise AoE handling on DMG page 249 (in short “make a call, consult ...


41

Boy, so many people lining up to tell you "don't do it that way it's badwrongfun!" I'll offer a differing perspective, which is yes, absolutely, use a house rule to this effect. It has the desired effect of adding verisimilitude without "nerfing" or "ruining" anything. I shall offer up real play experience and not pure opinion to demonstrate this. I used ...


38

metagaming was the worst thing that could happen in role-playing Well, this is just plain wrong; not having fun is the worst thing that can happen. It sounds like you're finding this out. I think you recognise that there is no right way to role-play or, more precisely, there are as many wrong ways as there are gaming groups because no group is ...


35

I suspect that there is an underlying issue here which has little or nothing to do with the rules. He's not "lawyering" in the usual sense - probing the DM to see what loopholes he can exploit. What I gather from the description is that he's second-guessing the DM with regards to how difficult the encounter is. Personally, I would do two things. First of ...


28

What you're running into is the difference between social costs and economic costs. Typically, the 'cost' for metagaming is a social one. When you metagame in a group that doesn't like metagaming, your friends get disappointed in you, and you feel embarrassed and ashamed for ruining other people's experience. What you've done is effectively replaced that ...


21

Ask the player why he doesn't trust you Maybe something happened while you were DMing that made him lose faith in you. Maybe something happened in another campaign that made him lose faith in all DMs. Whatever the issue, a role-playing game demands a certain amount of trust by all participants and—as you've experienced—things are uncomfortable if that ...


21

In the earliest rules, Chainmail with its Fantasy Supplement (Gygax & Perren, 1971), the fireball referenced the catapult rules for its mechanic. That includes the following optional rule (2E, p. 10): Fire Optional: Roll two different colored dice. One color is for an over-shoot and the other is for an under-shoot. To decide which number ...


20

If you're doing a stage play and something goes horribly wrong, but you manage to hide it from the audience then all is fine. However, if you then tell the audience what went wrong and how you managed to hide it the audience will feel cheated. As if they got a sub-par version of the play. The same can often be said about roleplaying. If the players go ...


13

Prepare for a long answer... This is, ultimately, a sign of a flaw in your enemy tactics, not in the player's use of Fireball. Wizards are scholars with years of study and practice under their belt. Sorcerers literally have magic in their blood, a part of their very being that they have grown up with and come to know as well as any part of their body. So ...


12

An intelligence (religion) or intelligence (arcana) check should help a character know the properties of a ghost's horrifying visage. How you set the DC is up to you, and is highly dependent upon the campaign setting. Are ghosts a common thing, where many people might know of the effect that seeing a ghost might have upon the victim? Or are ghosts ...


11

I will break this down into two parts - personal experience and generic effects. Personal experience Even though I did not DM much campaigns, in those that I did I shared my notes and ideas for the campaign after it ended and answered questions regarding the player's actions after sessions in case the answer did not affect the story any further. I ...


11

It's all about objectives... When designing (or interpreting, in the case of published adventures) encounters, you must identify the objectives of all parties involved. Truth be told, one's objective is rarely hold my ground until death. (There's a nice example of this, though, in DDEX3-10: ) Much more often an objective might be hold my ground until ...


11

There are many tricks that will help you remember, but most of them boil down to two things: Focus on the important stuff and write things down. That being said, here are a few more detailed pieces of advice that might help you. 1: Get rid of clutter I don't know anything about the Death House, but it seems to be a large mansion with a lot of rooms. The ...


10

You are not the first GM thinking about this, and there has been quite some discussion about it on Barf Forth Apocalyptica, the forum run by Vincent Baker. All quotes below are taken from posts there. There is one thread discussing specific examples of how this move can be made real, which is where most of this insight is from. Most MCs there play the move ...


10

A fireball is in D&D what artillery is on a battlefield. Just like intelligent soldiers know how to deal with artillery, intelligent monsters know how to deal with magic users. Continuing the military analogy there are basically five techniques: Dispersal, so that AoE will strike a limited number of combatants Cover, using natural or manufactured ...


10

Well, the reaction here largelly depends on your style of play, thus any answer may be of a very limited use in your game. Thus I'll just point out what I usually do in my games and you'll need to use your own judgement whether these methods fit in your game. First thing you should always have in mind is that players have much less of a sense of the world ...


9

"Hi Pete and welcome to our group. We play differently here and metagaming is encouraged here. I hope you won't have much problem with it. I am sorry if this is not what you were looking for, but I'd encourage you to give it a try anyway"


9

Depends on the party composition. Rogues here refers to any character with Trapfinding and ranks in Perception and Disable Device. 1 or more rogues When there are rogues in your party, traps become basically a rogues-only minigame. The rogue gets to roll Perception and Disable Device, everyone else gets to stand around and wait for the next combat to ...


8

"You pass an old crone on the road. She steps aside to let you pass, and looks at you. Suddenly she shouts 'You too have seen it! Oh yes! When? Just a few hours ago? You still have time then! Run! Run to the temple, they may help you!' ". In other words, an unexpected NPC is a solution to all your information dissemination problems.


8

In addition to making a Skill Check, any character who can actually cast Greater Restoration probably knows what kind of effects it is capable of dealing with. If any of your characters have the required class and level, they probably shouldn't have to make a check for it. As another alternative to rolling Religion or Arcana, you could also go for a ...


7

The game mechanics that have the most benefit are incentives. Reward the player that plays with role-playing as their focus. Give an indication or hint as to why the reward is being added. "As character X has made this decision, he/she finds X reward as a result." As a result you have encouraged good role-playing instead of decisions based on gaming. ...


7

There are basically three options here. RAW: Don't ignore the part of the spell description that indicates that the environment is affected by the spell as well. I.e. It ignites flammable objects in the area that aren’t being worn or carried. Meaning, sure the spell may not affect the player directly, but perhaps it burned the rug the ally is ...


7

Don't use a grid system If you are tired of pin-point accuracy, I would suggest you stop using a pin-point accurate grid system. In my experience, it's fairly easy to switch to a non-grid system while still using minis. Actually in one of my campaigns, we frequently switch between them, based on the level of sloth we're feeling. Ultimately, it's up to you ...


7

Since this is a somewhat subjective question, I'll give my first attempt at an answer. First let's get this out of the way: a lot of DM's need a little dose of courage when it comes to players trying to color outside the lines. Getting upset when your players go outside what you've planned is the absolute wrong reaction. This is gaming, not a poetry ...


6

It just shows how bad of a punishment XP loss is. There are some groups where that would work, but more often than not it doesn't. I would have done the same: if you can buy (or share with a friend) a vital info for your XP, why not go for it. It's likely that by taking away their XP you didn't show they can't do it, you just showed they can, for XP. Not to ...


6

First, it's good if you can find out why the player is playing a non-magic user. You found out it matches his character, which is good, but it might be good to find out what type of gameplay he likes, so you know what to provide and what not to avoid, which might be tricky if you yourself always prefer to player magic-using characters. Some reasons players ...


6

In a GURPS, 3rd Edition game using traditional magic, a nonmagic-using character can feel generally outclassed, especially at higher point values. However, this is usually mitigated by a few factors. Spells usually take at least 1 second of concentration to cast. A magician is often forced to stare off into space undefended because spells come into effect ...



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