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6

While a player might be distracted, forgetful, or just plain dumb, that does not mean his character is as well. Especially experienced characters should have a certain level of "safe" against player neglect, especially if the situation is touching on their area of expertise. Eriwan the Bard: "I can take two peasants, CHAAARG-" GM: "Err... Eriwan ...


4

Based on this answer and my comment on it, someone suggested I write an answer as well. I think I'm going to go with a "monster-of-the-week" style of campaign. I think that because she likes to have closure on each story rather quickly, I can mimic TV Series as to provide players with 1 to 2 (tops) session(s)-long scenarios, using PCs as the "main cast" of ...


3

It sounds like you have two problems - writing a story each week, and connecting them into an overarching plotline. Let's separate these out. Writing Individual Episodic Stories Specifically, since you're already going with a TV-show style of storytelling, why not gather inspiration from Vampire-themed TV shows? There's already a wealth of vampiric TV ...


3

I think you're doing the right thing based on the examples you've given. Realize there's several hurdles tabletop RPGs have which don't exist in other media, and leeway is necessary to clear them: Memory The fictional events and situations rest on the memory of the group. A common event in play is someone tries to do something ("I pick up the sword he ...


2

I've run a lot of episodic games, but there's major differences in how I've run them well vs. what you're looking to do. Many of the things you're asking to do are pretty easy, but running it "clue to clue" actually makes it hard. Episodic Games and what works well with them I've run episodic games as combat encounter focused play, in which case, it's ...


2

First thing: I'm sure you're already aware, but it is always a good idea to point out, the players should have some amount of control over the plot. The decisions they make should affect the narrative, so that it isn't you running your players through a story. Like I said, I'm sure you already know this. Now on to... Episodic Gaming The other answers have ...


2

Perhaps have them make a check (perception to notice the alarm's tripwire, intelligence to remember the invitation, knowledge X to recall that this is a foe likely to wipe the floor with them.) If they succeed on the check, you can give the player the warning because their character has cleverly remembered or noticed it. If they fail, the player(s) will ...


2

I would not try to write all scenarios before – not even all non filler scenarios – go in the other direction: have a vague idea about your intended overarching plot (along the way you will probably discover that thing go into completely different direction); prepare (i.e. find, create, or otherwise acquire) material for a single session/scenario/episode ...


1

One thing you need to remember when running a game is that the players do not have the benefit of actually living out the experience being role-played (unless you're LARPing). They can't feel the invitation in their pocket, they don't remember personally being burned by the sensors on the gate last time they tried to climb them, so they aren't going to ...



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