Hot answers tagged

111

Yes -- if you use that specific phrasing, "your character would not do that", you are denying their character's agency. The player is an authority over what their character wants to do; your authority is over what the character can do. Rather than tell the player that their character doesn't want to do something, instead express it as their character's ...


53

Firstly, the assumption you're making is well-meaning, but wrong: as DM you shouldn't feel like you can never “break character” to just speak as a person to the other people at the table. You're playing a game, and sometimes you need to pause playing and just talk about the game directly. It may seem counter-intuitive, but games work much better when you've ...


33

First: Ewwwww, yuk. Second: The bar is big enough to employ 2 barmaids - luckily the one he slept with is not his sister. This changes the situation from really gross to "dodged a bullet, lucky your sister wasn't working the first night, eh?" Oh, and they share a bedroom and each other's stuff because they're BFF. She comes home in the morning and doesn't ...


31

Unequivocally yes You can and should remind the player of what his or her character would know—“you know that doing this is going to have serious repercussions, like X, Y, and Z”—but the choice (including the choice of how to think about that) is the player’s and the player’s only. Situations where the character knows something, but the player does not, ...


22

I've got a buddy at work... we watch Game of Thrones together. My lasting college friends were all on our Ultimate Frisbee team together. 5e's got this too... Downtime Activities. The one tool I've best used to encourage the growth of PC-PC relationships is those characters' downtime activities. In one group there's a pair that like to run Three-Card Monty ...


20

No ... and here's why. I have said (How to get players to do something without them feeling railroaded?) that agency is: Players making informed meaningful decisions that have reasonable consequences that can be foreseen Assuming that the player was informed about the capabilities and limitations of the druid class at the time their character ...


19

Talk to the Rogue's player, out of game and before the next session. Explain to them what is going on and ask if they are happy to either run with the accidental incest plot line or want to change it retroactively. Even let the player come up with a reason why they did not end up sleeping with said bar wench: maybe a talisman, tattoo, birth mark, or ...


17

Yes, 8 kobolds all going at once can be very swingy at low levels. To help this, don't roll for their damage - just use the average damage number. I break monsters up into groups of three to five, to avoid this problem. For example, you could have two groups of three kobolds. Roll initiative separately for each group. That way you might get something like:...


12

Having dealt with this sort of problem in the past, I usually handle it by walking him through is turn, and attempt to anticipate problems before they occur. "Ok, you are making a full move? That would still leave you out of melee range. Now you can move as a second action, but the amount of move you have left won't allow you to attack until next turn." ...


12

Hot diggedy. Can you keep the story intact with this twist? I think it's a fun option that could really add drama, tension and character into what you're doing, but it is likely to be off-limits for some people and as a GM you need to respect that. You need to figure if your players would be uncomfortable with casual, accidental incest. You could print ...


10

I think that neither yourself nor your players, are playing Numenera. Warning signs such as "dungeon-making skills" and characters able to use 5 level of effort (wow!) makes me think that you are trying to play D&D with a different world and system. This will not work, as you clearly found out. This is an paradigm problem. In any case, the true path to ...


8

Yup! That's the problem with powerful magic healing - just as you've noticed, it trivializes minor wounds, and so (perhaps counter-intuitively) making healing easy and cheap tends to actually increase the stakes of combat to all-or-nothing. Similarly, if you make resurrection and/or repairing crippling injuries fairly easy, it ups the stakes even more so ...


7

I sometimes tell people: "I'm putting on my houserule hat for this one. I believe this is an official game rule, but just in case it's not, I'm making it a house rule as well." Sometimes I tell people: "here's how I think it works, if you can find a rules citation to prove me wrong we'll rewind, but in the meantime let's keep the game moving." But it's ...


7

The core of the issue As far as I can see, the most common cause of this issue is that the players don't feel the need to roleplay the sort of relationships you're after, because as far as they can tell, their characters have little reason to feel that way about each other. As DM, you can't tell the characters how to feel, but you can put them in situations ...


7

Well, there's no silver bullet solution. This isn't really an RPG problem, it's a pure-play interpersonal/psychological issue, variously called 'spotlight hog,' 'attention whore,' 'attention seeker,' et al. I'll call it "attention seeking," the more canonical term, going forward. In general especially for adults, "telling them to quit it and booting them if ...


7

Throw each kind of player a bone - and don't forget about your own fun Every player has certain things that really turn them on about gaming, and what makes the whole thing work is that almost everyone will happily go along with all the 'boring' stuff as long as they get their 'fix' at least once or twice each session. Some players love a tactical combat, ...


6

Yes, but.... YES, saying to a player, "your character would not do that," and then enforcing it denies their agency. I see no two ways around this, no sleight of hand phrasing in the denial that will change this. If the GM tells a player their character would not do something, then the character choice is no longer being made by the player, but by the GM. ...


6

Briefly: Based on the content of the question, it sounds like resurrection takes five days. Can you make something important happen during those five days, which would be costly to the dead character or to her player by not being around to participate in it? But: Where did "changing the resurrection system isn't an option" come from? Your players? As the ...


6

I have always used "passive initiative", and found no problems with balance or tactical calculation. I started out this way for two reasons: to reduce my workload and to give the players the pleasure of knowing just how good or bad their own roll was. I find it a minor bummer for players to think they rolled really well ("I got a 19!") and find out that it ...


6

It's pretty much up to you. Players won't like to feel like they're being forced down corridors, but it's hard to craft a coherent day's play on the fly (especially if you're just starting out). For now, I'd recommend being honest with your players and saying "Guys, I'm new to this, cancelling the mission will mean me winging everything and it probably won't ...


5

Make sure they know the rules One reason to overconserve powers is simply being unaware of the rules. Remind the players when the powers recharge, and that there's no cost in using the powers if they can recharge them right after the battle. Necessitate it In Finland we have this saying that translates roughly to "Siberia will teach 'em". It sounds like ...


5

I call this "Open World" versus "Story Arc." Obviously both styles are fine but I've seen this problem as well. The sides get a little tired of each other. If you want to bring your wanderers into the story I suggest you tie some plot points to their characters' history. Or rather, add their history to the plot points. Examples are to add in mid-crawl ...


5

Feeble mind This spell simply drops one's Inteligence to mere 1. There is no trapping soul unfortunately. Imprisonment Slumber. The Highpriest will be asleep. Clone + Minimus containment The highpriest, that they have seen is just a vessel. The real one is trapped inside a gem. You could modify Minimus containment, it is powerful enough to trap someone'...


5

Let it be AS IS. In real life this could happen. If they didn't have a reliable way of knowing, it doesn't really matter, and will only give a bit of awkwardness between them. If you have a prudish(?) set of players though, it wouldn't be a good idea...


5

Also see ways to prevent teleportation. Ways to prevent scrying Many countermeasures to the 4th-level Sor/Wiz spell scrying [div] (PH 274-5) and the 7th-level Sor/Wiz spell greater scrying [div] (PH 275) and other spells of the scrying subschool exist, but some of those countermeasures perform inadequately. The list below omits scrying countermeasures of ...


5

I have run a number of variously successful campaigns in D&D and Pathfinder that fall into that same middle area you described. A few times I ran into similar trouble as you, where the characters were having serious trouble bonding and forming connections beyond "we have to work together right now." I think that one of the most important things to do ...


4

The DMG is your friend. Take a look at p.237, "Multiple Ability Checks." This describes multiple ways we might handle the player's desire to SPAM ability checks. One is to gauge the time it might take to succeed by patient re-attempts, without rolling-until-success. Another is to modify the approach, with the proviso that failed attempts may improve or ...


4

The premise of the OP's comment itself is flawed -- while a Druid may not voluntarily choose to wear metal armor or take up a metal shield under normal circumstances, there are factors that can work against that rule: (IC) Force. Some would-be captor trying to keep a Druid from wriggling out of their grasp would be likely to use the rules surrounding ...


4

I have had more than one group like this, some like the overall "GRAND STORY" while others like the individual choice/freedom aspect. With a group that large: You could split up the group, though that would mean more work on your side as a GM/DM. Continue doing what you are doing. The best solution I have found is exactly what you are doing, a little ...


4

If you haven't, read Jack of Shadows by Roger Zelazny. It takes place in a world where (some) characters return from the dead. BUT. They can do it only a limited number of times (a number each one knows for himself, but keeps a deep secret for obvious reasons), and when they rise, they rise in a special location, far from their places of power. They must ...



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