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17

The ways to make monsters more challenging is to use 'player' tactics such as flanking, ambush and aid another. Using giant spiders as an example. Round 1 Check for surprise vs stealth (with a +14 for the modifier 11 as the base and 3 for distance). Assuming spiders get surprised, nail the PCs with eight touch attacks with web (at +5 to hit). Round 2 PCs ...


10

The reason the rolls seems unfair is a problem called Goblin Dice. When talking about combat, d20 decide if a goblin lives or dies - but we all know sooner or later he will kick the bucket. When we use d20 to determine the success of one-of-a-kind events (like making a bluff check, a diplomacy check or a riddle-solving check), the high variability of the ...


9

Three suggestions! People as threats You can keep monsters as monsters, but also include people as threats. People can be "talked to" but that doesn't mean they're reasonable. But what is fun and interesting about people is they can be cunning - they can adapt, and they open up a LOT of possibilities other than "fight to the death". I have a Big List ...


8

I can understand switching to a different character once, like, you didn't understand the system or the campaign, and you didn't realize what kind of character would be a good fit for you. But repeatedly doing it, after just a few sessions? It's time to sit down with the player and have a hard talk. "What do you want from this game? Here is what ...


8

When I've engaged in this, it's usually because I've made a series of NPCs. When not thinking, I tend to form character requirements for maximum conflict-safety. (Not to say invulnerability within the mechanics of combat, but boring characters who don't want anything and thus have no reason for drama or narrative engagement.) Thus, because they are boring, ...


8

Give them shared or mutually referential aspects! There are a couple ways to do this, and Fate Core suggests one of them already, so I'll talk about it first. The default character generation guidelines have players creating relationships between their characters as part of establishing backstory. Although this is often difficult to do and I don't always ...


4

This should be both abstract and specific. Gaining or losing members can be presented as a problem of scale, in which case it should be abstract, but always followed up with a personal example. Remember your principle to make everyone human. To make the gang human, you don't need to name and act them all out, but you do need to put a human face on the gang ...


3

Inevitably the best solution in these situations is Talk It Out If you've been experience a common problem at your tables but haven't been actually asked the players what's up (as alluded to when you say "I'm guessing"), you're failing in one of the primary duties of the GM; which is to make sure everyone is having fun. Now, it might be that this player is ...


3

Starting a business, group, school or Order I sometimes present situations to the players where they might see a notice for a shop or building that's for sale...Or its inherited in some way. Maybe someone they meet is setting up a small mercenary school and needs people to teach the new recuits? - even these might have their own challenges. Where do you get ...


3

I am this kind of player. I know it all too well, and more than once my GMs have talked to me about it. In my case, I "grew up" with DnD power-gamers, the types of players who dedicate themselves to creating the most powerful character possible within the rules, often bending said rules all the way to the breaking point. As a result, that's how I know how ...


3

Use both, but I would suggest not using an individual villain as more a group of people (who may or may not be led by a villain - the players shouldn't know that for most of the campaign). The Villain The Villain, group or individual, is the main antagonist of the group and the encounter them more often than other obstacles. She plots against the group and ...


2

I don't know your group, so I can't say whether an archenemy or a variety of environmental stuff will work better. But what I can give you, is a couple of tricks to make an archenemy more interesting. Subordinate Triad If I have an NPC that is going to be an ongoing problem, I like to set up a "Subordinate Triad". You know how Captain Kirk had Spock and ...


2

Starting items are an important boost for a lot of RM classes, power point adders and multipliers particularly can stop spellcasting classes being pretty weak in PP. However if your whole world is going to be "item free" then these are not appropriate tables to use. So here are options I'd suggest. Ditch the tables entirely, don't allow anyone to start ...


2

In the campaign I played in, we kept it abstract. Usually, the things that triggered a massive size shift were either someone getting a lot of new followers (someone got put up as a religious figurehead) or one of the really bad rolls/Harm effects for gangs where you get something like "Most dead, only a few survivors" kind of things. Aside from that, it's ...


2

I'm not the hugest fan of introducing puzzles like this into games but I think the best way to do this is to solve them out of character and then, if necessary, roleplay the solution in character. So long as everyone knows that you're going to do this (announcing it beforehand might be a good tactic), it eliminates or at least reduces many of the issues at ...


2

I would recommend figuring out what he wants from the game, instead of trying to make him play the game your way. Maybe he isn't interested in having plots revolving around him, or in building up a narrative around his character. Perhaps he enjoys being the guest hero of the week. In that case, plan around him changing characters. Let him know where the ...


1

Combine the best out of both worlds! Make the world a static hurdle with a fixed strength, while their enemy can be an ever changing foe. For example: The groups goal is a magic artifact in a hidden jungle cave. They have to get a map with the location, where they fight against the henchmen of the arch enemy. When they have the map they need to cross the ...


1

I use a mini-mass combat system inspired by the mook wads of Feng Shui. It is mainly designed to simulate squad on squad combat that the PCs are involved in but it also works to amp up the threat of a host of little critters. The long and short of it is, that if you take a unit of e.g. 10 identical 1st level warriors, they have an AC equal to a single ...



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