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17

Support characters We do this all the time. When one or more characters are separated from the group for a long time, the GM gives the other players characters to play with. The players must acknowledge they are playing secondary characters and most protagonism must be with the main character. In your case, give each player except the cleric a goblin. Give ...


14

I think the more important question here is why do you want to be more okay with PC death? When Gary Gygax ran his games back in the day, he was the original Killer GM. Everything in those old dungeons has a save-or-die effect, and that was rolled into how the players approached the game (ie, with backup characters and not a huge amount of attachment to ...


11

Make a Quicksheet You don't need the full rules, just the ones you use a lot. A short, 1-2 front & back sheet of paper with the important references. The value of this isn't just reference, it's because it's a thing for the players to look and fiddle with while they're playing - sometimes you need constant exposure to get things through. But it also ...


10

Teaching a game isn't really something that gets accomplished once at the beginning of the first session. It's a process that will last several sessions, even with experienced players. It's also important to remember that learning is also a responsibility... If your group aren't being good students you'll run into problems just as surely as if you weren't ...


10

Don't restart unless you want to. There are two clear options for this, and it's completely up to your preference (the current rules provide no clear guidance on this) Simply allow them to change PCs. Write their old PC out and their new PC in. Bring the new PC in at the current level and if everyone else has a magic item, it might not hurt to let them ...


8

Burst Out Of The Enemy's Tribute Chest, Covered in Pork Chops This is not the only way to handle this situation, but it's what I always do. Always. You know that trope when the 'party is split' in a movie or TV series, where you follow one character as they uncover things or do things that affect the things the main party is doing? They see the secret, ...


8

The problem with introducing a real world timer, in my opinion, is that the characters most likely know more about how to handle such situations than the your players do (well, unless your players are professional negotiators and/or SWAT people.) In my experience it's quite natural for players to discuss strategy and tactics, especially in critical ...


8

Yes, I do this kind of thing all the time in my supers games. I usually go with the first option; decide how long they have, then convert that into a game-measurable limit (the system I use calls them "panels"), but then if my players start getting bogged down in tactics I cut them off and say "Uh, guys? Clock's ticking, here." It helps that they rarely ...


7

I'm inclined to ask: Is it really a mistake? I think the answer depends on the game, if you are trying to run a game about the being characters, a game about their stories, a game about resolving (or even just experiencing a plot, or a game about a series of challenges. Each of these is a valid way to play, so I'll try not let my preferences color the ...


7

Barring in mind that in Pathfinder, and D&D as a whole, Good and Evil are not just concepts, but measurable, detectable, fundamentally defined forces of the Universe; such acts will draw attention from extra-planar beings. Setting aside what the player/character has said to other players/characters, ask the player what his character is truly thinking ...


6

There are two considerations here: revealing information out of game and the possibility of your players feeling lectured. Both are very different problems, better addressed separately. Revealing information out of game Actually, I don't have too much to say here. You, as the GM, the one that knows better the story, are responsible to know what information ...


5

I don't think this player actually made a mistake, unless you consider it a "mistake" that she didn't play out the encounter exactly as you expected she would (and I don't). Sure, gaining the aid of a powerful NPC would have been a boon to the party, but unless you've already statted out all future challenges with the assumption that said NPC would be with ...


5

People learn via practice. So you will need to be specific when talking to your players, and you will have to repeat your instructions each time. After a while they will start remembering what needs to be done and doing it automatically. To use saving throws as an example, don't say: The wizard casts a fireball at you. Roll your save. Instead say ...


5

Addressing this as a "What should I do?" instead of as "round limit or real-time limit", I think you might be looking at this the wrong way. Consider what SWAT teams (and other such organizations) do during a hostage situation. The essential problem with hostage situations is that its assumed that under ordinary breach circumstances the hostage takers (HTs) ...


5

Wax Eagle's answer ("Simply allow them to change PCs" and "Write in a class change for the PC") cover what I see as two of the three options. The last one came up with some regularity when I was running the playtest: let the player rebuild the character and declare that of course Quill has always been a Barbarian. Some people don't like retcons, but my own ...


5

Simply have them pick up a cursed item that changes their class and swaps their existing stats around to reflect the new class. They keep all their stuff, level etc. Or have a higher power do it, or an insane guy uses his last wish to cause the switch - whatever doesn't piss off the entire group. You may also want to impose a penalty such as an experience ...


4

Just have them remake their character as a new class, keeping their treasure and XP. This is normally not permitted by the rules (and multi classing, which will certainly be added in the Players Handbook, won't cover a replacement of class), but in this case there's no reason not to use your power as DM to override the rules. Think of the Starter Set like a ...


4

Option 1: Be inspired by Fate points. There is a mechanism in wfrpg called fate points which I have drawn inspiration from. A fate point basically says you were about to die but some twist of fate and luck kept you alive. I would use this concept to allow your monsters to rip people to shreds, but then use some plot element to save them from actual death ...


3

Good, Evil, Law and Chaos are all as real as Magic They are fundamental planar substances, like chaos diamonds or souls or rods of blasting or Githyanki. You have to decide what is Evil in your world, if it's absolute, if it's intent-based, what the deal is with it. Ergo with Good. And Chaos. And Law. And then any time anyone takes any of those ...


3

Ultimate Campaign pages 134–7 addresses how to track alignment. It uses a scale for good/evil and chaos/law and addresses how various actions move one toward other alignments along the scale. You can get the details on the Paizo PRD website for free.


3

I don't know RT and only roughly WH40k. That said I still want to propose the following: Talk to your player about how all-mighty the God-Emporer is. Talk about a common definition of "vendetta". Maybe you'll find that the player wants a target that will keep his character running forever. In this case "vendetta" may mean "my character blames the emporer ...


3

I've played a bunch of 1st edition L5R and a bit of 3rd edition, so I don't know how much anything has fundamentally changed - but as far as I remember, and from the sound of your question there is zero system support of how/when to translate actual play events into disadvantages. L5R isn't a very realistic game when it comes to wounds and gruesomeness... ...


3

When I read this I thought: Just don't. In "the real world" there is so much more random stuff that happens than meaningful stuff towards some goal that its the decision of the people on place to decide which dungeon to crawl and which to ignore. If one wants to explore every single house in every street then in how many of that houses you will find ...


2

The old Dream Park RPG from R. Talsorian Games had an excellent adventure-development concept called a Beat Chart. I haven't played Dream Park in twenty years, but I've been writing Beat Charts for my adventures ever since. It's that useful. In a nutshell, the Beat Chart divides the adventure into Beats, which are chunks of the adventure that either ...


2

In our campaign, my character always seems to be running off on her own, either because she's not interested in what the other party members are doing or she has something else she needs to take care of. The GM will spend the majority of his time working with the other party members and their actions, and then on occasion he will switch back to my character ...


2

The Setting I've run zombie apocalypse adventures before. The tricks that worked for me were: (1) Start with a lot of low level characters, (2) Have them search for a defendable position, (3) Only hit them with small groups of zombies at first, (4) Let them get comfortable, then (5) over run them with a large "herd" of zombies, and (6) Chase them until they ...


2

Zombie apocalypses range from a slug feast (Left4Dead2) to a vehicle for huis-clos building on the survivors' slow but assured spiral into inhumanity (Walking Dead). It seems that you are aiming more towards the latter. For me, Night of the Living Dead and Walking Dead and ... are all scary because they are all about the slow, methodical, and inextricable ...


2

Character generation, world creation I read this on a series of sandbox articles, but don't remember where. Don't create all the world before the characters. Let empty space to be filled later. Then, when creating the characters, allow them to create part of the world. Example: A player creates a character who was raised by a cult who worship a powerful ...


1

Why not both? I'd go with a hybrid of your two ideas for this scenario. The PCs only have so many rounds to complete their mission. The players are only allowed so many minutes per round to discuss strategy. This way you still get the sense of immediacy that you are looking for in game, while also preventing the game from getting too bogged down. ...


1

If you're playing a fantasy RPG in a world where magic exists, then death doesn't have to be permanent. There are ways to resurrect players, or travel to the land of the dead to rescue them, or even ways they could be cursed with immortality. I play with a role-play heavy group, and in my first campaign our PCs were cursed with immortality - we would return ...



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