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41

Generally, you should only tell them what their character knows. Some DMs don't even tell them the creature's name until afterwards, they just describe its appearance. Let them make a skill check to see how much they know (eg arcana, nature, religion, history - depending on the type of creature. Or perception, if there is some visual clue). Or, if you ...


38

I've played in and run evil campaigns of various sorts in both 3.5 and 4e (though not 5e, I think my learning will transfer), and run into a lot of problems: My Guy Syndrome comes up a lot, as does a tendency to default to a regular D&D storyline only with more stealing of spoons and kicking of puppies to remind ourselves we're evil. Sometimes an evil ...


16

The most important thing for an evil campaign to work is to give the players a goal or objective. In a good-aligned campaign, you don't need to necessarily start with a clear goal, and often you don't want to, as often the player's role is reactionary; someone does something bad and the players have to stop them. They do good for it's own sake, because ...


10

It's Up to the DM Really, it is. Does the DM want everyone to roll every time a character opens their mouth? Or just when they're "selling an idea?" It's up to the DM. As Often As Is Needed This is a good rule of thumb. Roll bluff as often as it is needed. For me, whenever I DM, I only call for bluff checks whenever someone is trying to "sell an idea." ...


8

I generally don't give anything away. Discovery is part of the fun to the player. I try to give a very detailed description of the monster as the players would see it (if it's in low light they may not see ALL the tentacles). If a player has a skill that might give them some more information I'd let them roll to see if they'd know a bit more.


7

It seems to me like you've taken the wrong message from some of the previous answers; I haven't read them, so I don't know exactly where they were coming from, but here's the gist: While "don't make the players roll for something they have to find to proceed" is an okay rule of thumb, it's not very nuanced. A better version of that rule is "do not give ...


6

Whenever I ask players to make a roll I have the following two things into consideration: Would it be dramatic for the players to fail at this point in time? Is this a place where the failure or success of the players can lead to a branch or some other consequence in the story? A practical example: The current plot requires that two characters sneak ...


5

You have to balance out the fun of discovering a new monster with how devastating a LACK of knowledge could be to the party. Consider the harpy, with it's ability to lure in folks who fail a DC11 wis check. This could wipe out the entire party if they don't know to plug their ears. So is it more fun (for the players) to know about this and act accordingly ...


5

Many GMs struggle to run gainful social interaction well (cf. this article). In D&D 3.X there are 3 main social skills: Bluff, Diplomacy, and Sense Motive. Some other skills, like Disguise, are effectively a specialized version of one of these general skills in terms of social use. All of these general social skills can also be used for other purposes ...


4

This depends on your playstyle and the way you want to play. Would the characters' reasonably know about these creatures and is that something you want to have the players' have access to as part of play? Now, there's plenty of old school play where you pretty much know nothing about a creature until you've dealt with it enough to figure out what it can ...


3

I make here the assumption, based on your other post, that you're referring to "God" in a monotheist rather than polytheist vision. This makes a major difference : a monotheist "God" tend to transcend all qualities, possess all of them, etc. Such God will be ineffable and completely out of understanding of any mind, and it's mere "presence" is likely to ...


3

Taking a page from history, in medieval Europe unemployed mercenaries would sometimes resort to brigandage to supplement their income. Players as bandits aren't necessarily evil with a capital E, they could be more like self-interested Robin Hoods. There's no need to roleplay torture, rape, murder. You could dangle the opportunity for banditry/thievery in ...


3

One option would be to back the "crunch" level down a notch. Even if flight is central to the characters and campaign (S&R, bush flying, or similar, I'd presume, if a C172 is in play as opposed to a T-38 Talon or similar), it should be reasonable to presume that icing conditions, IFR vs. VFR, and other considerations that affect real-life flight would ...


1

I think you're best just using the METAR data from the real world, after all that's what the PCs would be using. It's easily available via the web (I use skyvector.com to find stations) and if they move a long way quickly you can get the data from the new location much more quickly from a laptop or tablet than you could generate realistic weather with dice. ...


1

Don't read the MM. Either send monsters with no killing tricky features (like harpies have), or give them the important information (or some opportunity to get it) through skill rolls (as others suggested) or NPCs and other in-game ways. The more emphasis on stats, the more the players will take it as a PC game, just with graphics substituted by ...



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