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13

Some of the games tagged on your question do specify in their rules, adventures and supplements that certain rolls can or should be made in secret. However, in practice, whether any given roll is made secretly or openly is a matter of playstyle choice and varies from table to table. There are a number of reasons to keep the results of rolls secret. The ...


5

To begin I want to cover the idea of fudging a roll. It may be considered controversial and all to many people, but it's both advised and explained in the DMG pg 18: DM CHEATING AND PLAYER PERCEPTIONS Terrible things can happen in the game because the dice just go awry. Everything might be going fine, when suddenly the players have a run of bad luck. A ...


2

Give it a half-life After a few weeks/months Dense Iron degrades into regular iron or even "light iron" and loses it's awesome or magical properties. Or maybe falls apart completely. It's going to be hard to keep a steady supply of Dense Iron Warhammers for one person much less an army.


2

It sounds like the player isn't 'clicking' with the harsher system. I had a similar thing happen with one of my players when we moved from D&D to Only War (a Warhammer 40K based d100 system where you're often rubbish at everything). He failed a lot and would sulk as a result. We explained to him that this is how the game works and he decided he didn't ...


1

No* I have not read that the DM ought to hide all die rolls in D&D 3.0e and 3.5e. This comes from reading the SRDs, the player's guide, and the DM's guide (albeit not recently). There are some spells or mechanics which do require a "secret" roll, such as reputation, disguise checks, and some spells. However, there is strong evidence that all the rolls ...


1

Maybe try Paranoia: High Programmers and as GM you can take the role of all the underling challengers and just basically be forcing the lone player to make a whole lot of choices to keep their empire from falling apart. There will be rival UVs, Violets pretending to be your best servant, plotting to take your spot. Up and coming Indigos trying to rat out the ...


1

All of the above is good advice. I'd just like to add one thing that confuses and annoys people used to d20 rather than 3d6 systems. The odds can be very different in the interesting range of numbers. For example, if you have skill 12, using a combat option that gives you a -6 penalty for significant advantage can look like a reasonable bet to a d20 player....



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