Hot answers tagged

27

Yes -- if you use that specific phrasing, "your character would not do that", you are denying their character's agency. Rather than use that phrasing, you should go a little deeper and explain why, in your world, the player's character would not do that. For example: Druid: I put on the chain shirt. DM: You think about putting on the chain shirt and ...


16

One way for religion to matter, as you suggest, is for it to cause adventures. At a surface level, this is no more difficult that getting any other factor to cause adventures-- Give that factor power and the authority to hand out quests or obligations, and go from there. Even the narrow history and literature of western Europe presents several broad ideas: ...


12

Unequivocally yes You can and should remind the player of what his or her character would know—“you know that doing this is going to have serious repercussions, like X, Y, and Z”—but the choice (including the choice of how to think about that) is the player’s and the player’s only. Situations where the character knows something, but the player does not, ...


10

Religion can lead to a lot of adventures in real life. (The Crusades come to mind...) The key, I would say, is that you think about the values and culture beyond just the trappings. Is the religion evangelical, with mission trips abroad? Large, with important conferences and councils? Are members dedicated to local service in the community? Are they ...


5

No ... and here's why. I have said (How to get players to do something without them feeling railroaded?) that agency is: Players making informed meaningful decisions that have reasonable consequences that can be foreseen Assuming that the player was informed about the capabilities and limitations of the druid class at the time their character entered ...


5

Hum... Mind Blank? In the case of scrying that scans an area the creature is in, such as arcane eye, the spell works but the creature simply isn’t detected. Scrying attempts that are targeted specifically at the subject do not work at all. If your villain is strong enough to attract the attention of an 18th-level party, then I would assume she has ...


4

Anything PCs can do NPCs can do You can just have your NPCs take the same precautions that the PCs do against this. If the PCs take no precautions then by all means kill them dead and the problem goes away. Example; They wanted to defeat a pirate fleet. simply found out who the captain was, waited till they scryed on him sleeping, then teleported in ...


3

As is so often the case, I believe the answer to this question is more nuanced than a simple yes or no, and it depends on the precise circumstances. Does what the character is doing impact on the RAW requirements of a class, power, feature etc? For example, lets say that the requirements for being a druid specifically state that they cannot use any metal ...


3

Churches have hierarchies and structures like kingdoms, and even among true believers in the same gods, there can be power struggles, factions, disagreements. You could have the order become divided. You could have a corrupt person become the leader of the organization (especially if the God isn't an interventionist God or hasn't been seen for a while). ...


2

Yes, but.... YES, saying to a player, "your character would not do that," and then enforcing it denies their agency. I see no two ways around this, no sleight of hand phrasing in the denial that will change this. If the GM tells a player their character would not do something, then the character choice is no longer being made by the player, but by the GM. ...


2

While not a rules-based solution, you can always make the intended targets of the scrying/teleporting either immunue to or aware that the PC's are doing this. An example from Critical Role: the PC's attempt to scry on a beholder to learn his whereabouts. The beholder is aware of this and talks back to the PC through the scrying ritual, taking them by ...


2

D&D is a game which enables players to do anything they can imagine (That is within their characters physical means). Telling a PC simply 'no, you cannot do that', is not a good way to DM, it breaks the suspension of disbelief. If that druid wants to put on that chainmail, so be it. They should know their character, and that a druid shouldn't wear that ...


2

Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition is a game that changes significantly at different ranges of character levels. Low level games are very different from mid level games, which are different from high level games. Eberron is a campaign setting best suited for low level characters, precisely because it's designed with mystery investigations in mind. High ...


1

The premise of the OP's comment itself is flawed -- while a Druid may not voluntarily choose to wear metal armor or take up a metal shield under normal circumstances, there are factors that can work against that rule: (IC) Force. Some would-be captor trying to keep a Druid from wriggling out of their grasp would be likely to use the rules surrounding ...


1

One method: http://www.d20srd.org/srd/spells/detectScrying.htm Duration: 24 hours You immediately become aware of any attempt to observe you by means of a divination (scrying) spell or effect. The spell’s area radiates from you and moves as you move. You know the location of every magical sensor within the spell’s area. Not much can beat a ...


1

One good low-level countermeasure is to sleep in a rope trick space. This space is not part of the Material Plane and thus cannot be teleported to. I don't think plane shift works either since nobody is likely to have a planar tuning fork keyed to your rope trick space. Certain creatures might be able to play games with vision-blocking effects. For ...


1

There's a couple different options on how you could curtail this activity. I liked the mutually assured destruction method above as well. Like all spying and espionage, eventually, the other side learns your techniques and will do something to counter them. One way, would be to set a trap for them. You are the DM, you can come up with the reason why, but ...


1

First, don't assume the players are ever going to do things the way you expect them to. You've taken away your options. Now, you have a few options. If you need them all to meet up at a certain place, either start the adventure at that place or, if this is mid-game, place the spot right in their tracks so they won't miss it. Place it inside a narrative. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible