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1

Skill challenges If you're asking about the more gameplay related mechanics in orchestrating a mystery in Fate, I suppose the best way to do so is to plan out the Mystery, determine who the killer was or what was stolen, create suspects to throw the PCs off of the trail of a potential Thief or Murderer, add clues that the Players can find that point towards ...


3

Lisa Padol did run a fair number of mystery plots (we had a detective PC, which certainly helped, plus she tends to mine Call of Cthulhu and similar games for adventures) in her Kerberos Club Fate game (I played Alice), built with Fate v2 — but the rules are still fundamentally the same in Fate Core (v3) even with the reduction to the "four actions" — ...


1

That's awesome. Even if they never come up, the character is more interesting. If they ever do suggest a way to use those skills, play along with it as much as possible. I love moments where a random background skill is useful. Throw in some hooks that give more opportunities for them to bring it up. Ask if there's things they want more of in the campaign. ...


1

I tend to allow the players to make whatever characters they want. I then try to find ties (with the players help) within the group to make them somehow know each other or make their backgrounds intertwined. I must admit the system I play makes this fairly easy (edge of the empire). Once the game starts the best thing you can do to tie everyone together is ...


3

Exploring the past, literally One thing I like to do, and that work in all systems (but not in all settings) is to have the group be stuck in a "mystic/magic/virtual" space where they have to explore each other background. For example, in my current MHR game, the characters got stuck in the Psychic plane, and had to explore each other's mind. Each scene ...


2

Incorporate elements of a characters backstory into the backstory of other characters. This is a good way to get the characters interested in the overall backstory of characters other than their own. When you have a person create a character, normally you'd ask them to write a paragraph or two including a few NPCs which they've met or that have influenced ...


1

When it comes to downtime remember that if it isn't fun, hand wave it. To be honest, Truly interesting downtime requires many different bits to even set up properly. You stated using redesigned adventures. It is in my opinion that downtime events are easier with this adventure type but not as in depth or important as they are when you have designed a ...


8

I do several things to keep the player characters interested and invested in each other. At the start of the game, I insist that players coordinate backgrounds (subject to my approval) such that each character know at least one, and preferably two or more, of the other characters. In general, I prefer these connections be positive; the most negative I ...


12

Make Sure Your Players Want To Be Interested Check with your players - are they really all that concerned about being invested in each others' characters? It could well be that your players want to play a pure hack 'n slash game, where characters aren't much more than a collection of stats. If so, then let them do it! If you personally want a more ...


8

One of the primary activities in an RPG is problem-solving. Make sure that each scene you run has a problem to be solved! (If you can't think of a problem with a given scene, don't bother running it. It's okay to skip the boring bits!) Here are some examples. The local army recruiter has decided that your character would make a great recruit. He keeps ...


4

Since this is a system-agnostic question I will pretend you're not tied to whatever game system you're playing now. Of course, some of the things I will talk about can be ingrained in other games as well, but be a ware that I'm talking aout mechanics that interact with other parts of these gaming systems, as opposed to psychological tricks that can be used ...


3

You could use "Secret ink glasses" : you mark the traps on the map with invisible ink, then put the glasses on, and you're the only one that can see traps ! Pretty fun ;) It's called polarizing ink, you can see an example here : Polarizing ink and glasse video example - Youtube


3

A very simple approach, which I'm surprised no one has suggested yet, is to simply not decide in advance. Say there are 100 squares, and you want to have 10 traps. So whenever a PC moves to a square they have not been on before, roll a d20, and on a 1 or 2 they stepped on a trap. Problem solved! Or say there are 5 pit traps and 10 spike traps. Now 1 or 2 ...


1

While Erik has an excellent idea I think it should be taken farther: Once someone gets the idea that the floor markings are the guide it's simple enough to only step on squares with a symbol a kobold stepped on, or on squares which it's apparent a kobold must step on because they have no choice at that point. (A kobold retreats into the room, the symbol on ...


1

The first piece of advice I have for GMing in Edge of the Empire or any of the other FFG Star Wars line is to Play it Loose. The dice do all the intricate story telling you need. Advantage and threat tend to take care of any small problems you may want to put into the game. You should have a good idea of what things might be able to happen to your players in ...


0

The easiest way to do this with the least amount of prep time and game time is to use Roll20 and note the squares where traps are located using the drawing feature and the GM information overlay (which is invisible to the users). I frequently use this for things like trip wires, pit traps, falling stalactites, snares, etcetera. Pros: You don't have to ...


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I've used a "Minesweeper" strategy for this to good effect. To use @Lunin's example: |T 3 T| | T | |T 4 T| | T | |T 4 T| | T ========= |T 4 T T T | T 4 T 4 T 4 T |T 3 T T T =============== Instead of the numbers, I drew a star-like pattern with a point pointing toward a trap (and a dot in the center if that square was ...


1

Assign coordinates to your map. Mark one side with letters and one side with numbers. Track, in your gm notes, which squares have traps. For example: E8: Snare G6: Pitfall Alternatively, use graphing paper as a smaller representation of the map in your notes, and mark the traps and other hidden things on there. Just cross reference as you play.


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How do the Kobolds remember which parts are trapped? Basically, this answer is about weaving the Kobold's own marking system into the narrative. It does assume you draw your own maps and don't use Dungeon Tiles or anything. Obtain 6 or so pretty looking symbols (they don't need to have meaning, but if they look Draconic it's bonus awesome) Mark every ...


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This answer basically trades significant amounts of out-of-game prep-time in order to save in-game play-time. For a variety of reasons (but mostly because it’s horribly tedious), I have only used it a few times. The idea is to mark traps on the grid, and then cut up post-it notes and cover the markings. Have to make sure you have sufficiently-opaque post-it ...


11

I did something like this for a specific large passage in a dungeon in my game, the solution that worked well for me was to have trap placement dictated by a hidden pattern At first it might seem like this would be too obvious, but you'd be surprised how difficult it is to work out a pattern when you don't even know if there is a pattern in the first place, ...


3

Not trying to sidestep your question, but I think your goal can be accomplished without tracking each square. Track "Zones" In your notes, you could identify areas of the map that contain certain kinds of traps without specifying where exactly on the grid the trap is. When someone passes through a zone, just assign the trap a specific square. This might ...


2

I would consider marking each square with something, both the trapped and untrapped. You could also tie this visual to a feature, basically say "The blue dots denote the number of shallow pools of water, the dot is a pool, the blue is water. The dash means a tree root, the green means it is covered in ivy." Or whatever, but the idea is you could weave ...


0

Track which squares are not trapped. Unexplored squares then could be either trapped or not trapped (Schrödinger's trap?) depending on who steps on them first. Shaping the battle map to more or less suggest the path, like this stalactite to that stalactite, would be much easier than trying to memorize a couple dozen nearly arbitrary coordinates.


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From your comment "It doesn't matter what theme and mood we use", it sounds as if you are constantly starting new campaigns. That may be necessary, but it's never good; and it's hardly surprising that the players don't know 'what will fit' in an entirely new system and setting. What I would recommend is something that is always useful when starting a new ...


1

Use "Yes, and..." or "yes, but..." Reacting quickly is perfectly sensible! However, it shouldn't mean that no-one else gets to find out what's going on. If the wall collapsing is primarily narration and wasn't going to trap the players anyway, I would go with something like: GM: You hear a cracking sound- PC: I dive out of the way. GM: OK. The collapsing ...


16

I'm going straight for the kill. Remove Him From The Group There doesn't seem to be any other applicable answer. The biggest red flag here is that he has already been talked to and ignored the feelings of the rest of the party. This is a major no-no in RPing, at least in my groups. Ignoring the next portion of my answer, this alone is the main reason they ...


4

While you might feel like you're on your last resort right now, this really isn't the case. Your options presented might feel very definitive, but this really isn't the case. Killing his character I.E. forcing him to play a new character. This is not recommended. It would only solve your problem if the problem is the character's behavior, and even then, ...


14

The traditional answer to this is, "Write it down and pass a note." In the 21st century, I might change that to, "Send a text." Of course, nothing prevents your players from passing the note around amongst themselves, or reading it aloud. In some circumstances, "Take one player aside and talk to him or her." However, I think you might be asking two or ...


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It sounds like you have a problem with players metagaming (acting on information the player has, but his character doesn't), and you're fixing that by having the players explicitly inform each other. This usually works fine as long as players don't have to do it too often – but if you're requiring them to relay the info to the group every time they ...



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