New answers tagged

-4

everyone has ideas that get shut down by the gm. if you play long enough, eventually you'll throw an idea that doesn't work. it sounds like your player has a much higher percentage of ideas that need to be shut down which is fine. for example, jumping up and stabbing a mech can result in many possible mechanics. the katana doesn't breach, he takes damage for ...


-3

Man I have dealt with this issue SO MANY TIMES and every time I vow to never play again. I had a player that felt it was his goal to be a "saiyin" or "godzilla" of which he found a template online. Thus thinking it was totally legit...As well all here know, that is not the case. Here are some of the approaches that I've taken before Change up the ...


5

You're the GM and if his "play style" is incompatible with yours, and the other players are fine with your style, as you describe, don't enable him and let his controlling behavior emotionally blackmail you into changing the way you run your game. Just run your play style and let him deal with it. If he can't handle it, he can leave. That is NOT "rude" nor "...


34

Stop playing. Here are the constraints you've put on this answer: Player X makes this activity not-fun. Player X will not stop making this activity not-fun. Player X cannot be excluded from this activity. If these constraints are real, you should stop doing that activity. Do something different instead; whether that means movie night, or a different ...


7

To your point there are loads of questions about group dynamics on RPG.SE and a lot of them boil down to talk to the player. IMO the reason they boil down to having an honest conversation is because the goal for everyone is to have fun. If someone isn't enjoying themselves it can often be because of a disconnect between their expectations and those of the ...


7

One of the jobs of the DM is to create a situation where everyone can have fun. It sounds like your campaign is failing to allow this particular player to have fun in the way he wants. He seems to want to feel like a badass that can handle anything, while you have to keep your game balanced and fair. The way I handle these sorts of players (and I have a ...


3

Change your Play-Style Beyond the obvious choice to boot him or talk to him -- since you've said these are not an option -- you can change your play-style to match his. This is the humble approach and it requires the biting of tongues and more than likely his being cool about it. I want to be clear here, this option is putting this player's wants before ...


2

Ultimately, your options are to get your player to change their behavior, mitigate the negative effects of their behavior if they refuse to change, or kick them out. Getting Them To Change Their Behavior You mentioned that you tried talking to this player, to no effect. I don't know the specifics of how you went about this discussion, but it is possible ...


12

You really have two problems here, disguised as one. One is the game time problem of how to mesh what you want out a gaming experience with this kid and two is how to handle group conflict in a passive group that considers the cohesion of the group more important than the game. I'm gonna start with number 2. You say you can't kick him out because it will ...


29

I've got an answer for your problem, which I will address first, and then something for you. Yay! Group Effort This is the one avenue it looks like you haven't taken. You know you haven't taken it, and it seems you're reluctant to do so. Likely because, even if you did get the others behind you, this person would act out, become sullen, and maybe increase ...


8

It may be the case that you need to be cruel to be kind. This has only happened to be once as a DM where a character wouldn't listen to my rulings as a DM. First I asked him if he would be willing to DM, to show me how it should be done, but he refused. After that I told him he'd either have to accept that when I said "it's X and that's the end of it", he ...


-1

There's plenty of in-game options to make encounters more challenging and last longer. Poison gas and other kinds of poisons, diseases and ability score lowering means do well in lowering the damage output of players. There's also a lot of good conditions out there that you could utilize to that effect. (Conditions like Exhausted, Entangled, Fatigued, ...


3

As a GM, Never Decide A Correct Course of Action, Only Decide Consequences As a GM your calling is to create a great story. Stories are about conflicts that arise as characters with motivations make choices. Thus, the best thing you can do as a GM is to structure the 'adventure' to be about the story and the conflicts, and not about something concrete being ...


1

When I'm planning an adventure, I try to put myself in the PCs' shoes and determine what the next likely course of action for them is, given their motivations and knowledge. I then spend the most time planning for what they're likely to do. I'm not always right about what they plan on doing. Sometimes I overlook something that was important to them, which ...


1

Use mnemo-techniques like method of loci. This should be fairly easy - because you have to imagine the place where you and your players (virtually) go anyways. Make yourself comfortable with the location you are going to visit. Think in strong absurd pictures. If there are creatures lurking imagine them with unusal colors: a pink goblin, a yellow ork, a ...


0

The game doesn't really try to simulate what could happen in 6 seconds. To its rules, whether your move action used 2/3 or 1/6 of your movement does not matter. Of course, dear friend, this is going to hurt if you start assuming that things work differently than we all know they do, because we won't be playing the same game anymore. Now, this is basically ...


1

I'd like to share a story with you about how one of my campaigns began to illustrate how I handled a situation like this. “Shopping, some bandits, and an execution gone wrong” At the start of this campaign, the party found itself in the hometown of one of the party members. They were made aware of an execution which was scheduled to happen at noon, but ...


0

Was his exact position fixed? Was it important he couldn't easily get back to combat? If not, consider pretending he was a little bit closer at the start -- having players run towards combat is not really fun. Was he confused by a different edition? IIRC in 4e, you can move, and then charge, round a corner like this, but in 3.5e and Pathfinder your whole ...


2

One approach is to think about how stories generally tend to work. There may well be moments when a hero has a moment of doubt or uncertainty but the existence of the story (in hindsight) mean, by it's very existence that they went ahead anyway. As a GM you can have a certain role as 'fate' to keep the heroic story ticking over, obviously there are serious ...


0

I would recommend #4 of SevenSidedDie (let them avoid the adventure) but with a twist. This method takes a long preparation so if you don't have much time you may ignore it. Map out immediate area around the group. Nearby towns, their merchants smaller quests, rumors and things like these. So that if they fall off track, let them roam around and enjoy the ...


0

As a corollary to some of the other answers here, note that your players might just be on your side. GM: "You see a thief running towards the marketplace, and-" Players: "Oh, good! We should chase him! That'll give us a good excuse to meet up with everyone else!" If you all want the same thing - and in this case, you probably do - there's no need to "get"...


53

Firstly, the assumption you're making is well-meaning, but wrong: as DM you shouldn't feel like you can never “break character” to just speak as a person to the other people at the table. You're playing a game, and sometimes you need to pause playing and just talk about the game directly. It may seem counter-intuitive, but games work much better when you've ...


0

Welcome, Your question is somewhat opinion based but I will cover a few play tested styles and situations in my response. example: We turn around and go home This one is easily prevented, often there are reasons not to turn around and go home, I particularly enjoy catering potential quest rewards to the players characters. For example, when creating ...


6

It's pretty much up to you. Players won't like to feel like they're being forced down corridors, but it's hard to craft a coherent day's play on the fly (especially if you're just starting out). For now, I'd recommend being honest with your players and saying "Guys, I'm new to this, cancelling the mission will mean me winging everything and it probably won't ...


4

The DMG is your friend. Take a look at p.237, "Multiple Ability Checks." This describes multiple ways we might handle the player's desire to SPAM ability checks. One is to gauge the time it might take to succeed by patient re-attempts, without rolling-until-success. Another is to modify the approach, with the proviso that failed attempts may improve or ...


2

One simple technique that I have found to easily track who is carrying the lamp (or torch, etc.) is found in this (slightly amusing) video by Lindybeige. He suggests that you blu-tac a small tiddly-wink to the bottom of the lantern-carrying character, so that you always know where the light source is. This both reminds you to think about light, and gives a ...


3

Inspiration is your friend. In general, the answer is usually to talk to your players. However, if you want to work this through in-game behavior, you need to provide in-game incentives. Fortunately, 5e has a built-in mechanic expressly for this problem. If someone role plays an interaction, give them Inspiration. It is expressly there as a reward for good ...


7

Throw each kind of player a bone - and don't forget about your own fun Every player has certain things that really turn them on about gaming, and what makes the whole thing work is that almost everyone will happily go along with all the 'boring' stuff as long as they get their 'fix' at least once or twice each session. Some players love a tactical combat, ...


7

Well, there's no silver bullet solution. This isn't really an RPG problem, it's a pure-play interpersonal/psychological issue, variously called 'spotlight hog,' 'attention whore,' 'attention seeker,' et al. I'll call it "attention seeking," the more canonical term, going forward. In general especially for adults, "telling them to quit it and booting them if ...


0

One has to be very careful here, while much of the above is true, let me tell you a little tale. In a game I played in years ago our party was escaping a camp where some weird and deadly things were happening. One player was well ahead of the group and came to a road in the wilderness with chasm just beyond, he could go left, right, or turn back. The GM did ...


1

As a GM you cannot and should not force, coerce, and manipulate your players to satisfy your needs even if it is for their own good. Of course, OP are not doing that (as OP pointed out in a comment), so that is good. You need to talk to the players and raise your concerns. Ask them if they share those concerns and if so, what you all should do about it. I ...


7

The core of the issue As far as I can see, the most common cause of this issue is that the players don't feel the need to roleplay the sort of relationships you're after, because as far as they can tell, their characters have little reason to feel that way about each other. As DM, you can't tell the characters how to feel, but you can put them in situations ...


1

I typically try to break up enemies into 3 to 5 "groups" of combatants to help smooth out the swinginess and to make the battle a little more tactical. You can do this a few different ways. Break out a group. So 8 Kobolds would move in 4 pairs that each roll separately. Move in similar units. Kobolds + Ambush Drakes. They both have the same initiative, if ...


5

I have run a number of variously successful campaigns in D&D and Pathfinder that fall into that same middle area you described. A few times I ran into similar trouble as you, where the characters were having serious trouble bonding and forming connections beyond "we have to work together right now." I think that one of the most important things to do ...


0

"To be friends" does not mean the same thing for everyone, so it is likely it won't mean the same thing for every PC. If your group is composed of standard murderhobos, friendship can come from mutual help. You have to show them how they all need each other to do their murderhobo stuff. For example you can make the warrior being targeted by a curse, let ...


0

Your story is important, but so is the desire of the players to actually 'ROLEPLAY' their characters. This is where knowing your group dynamic is important. Some groups desire the classic "Hack & Slash" type of dungeon crawl adventure, of killing the dragon and taking the hoard. Others enjoy the narrative aspect of the adventure, the "why" of the ...


0

The party dynamic itself is in and of itself an adventure. I have been in games and run games where the PCs hate each other but work toward the common goal because if they don't they all will lose. I have had one PC hire assassins to kill part of the party for balancing the representation of all the alignments against the extra-planar incursion, whereas it ...


22

I've got a buddy at work... we watch Game of Thrones together. My lasting college friends were all on our Ultimate Frisbee team together. 5e's got this too... Downtime Activities. The one tool I've best used to encourage the growth of PC-PC relationships is those characters' downtime activities. In one group there's a pair that like to run Three-Card Monty ...


0

I'm not going to address the mechanics of resurrection, since your question pretty much states "changing the resurrection system isn't an option". I am however going to proceed under the assumption that the physical body of the deceased comes back to life, and does not spontaneously appear out of thin air, alive and well. There are plenty of mechanical ...


1

Thanks to the further clarification that yes there's an attribute like constitution! You can borrow a mechanical method from AD&D 1e: the cost for dying and being brought back is permanent loss of a Constitution Point. That score also defines a statutory limit on the number of times being brought back from the dead can happen. Death has ...


0

Just because there isn't a specific rule for lingering wounds doesn't mean you can't create them (admittedly I'm not well-versed with Pathfinder). If your players are OK with you bending the rules a little the loss of fingers/limbs/familiars etc. could be interesting as long as their characters aren't made redundant. Similarly, wounds that would make them ...


3

I have played HotDQ and have been tempted, at first, to do the same thing, group Kobolds together in order to save time. However, I have come to realize that this would enable the Kobolds to gain a lot of benefits they would possibly not have when rolling initiative normally. Let me elaborate. Enemies such as kobolds often have features that make them ...


17

Yes, 8 kobolds all going at once can be very swingy at low levels. To help this, don't roll for their damage - just use the average damage number. I break monsters up into groups of three to five, to avoid this problem. For example, you could have two groups of three kobolds. Roll initiative separately for each group. That way you might get something like:...


6

I have always used "passive initiative", and found no problems with balance or tactical calculation. I started out this way for two reasons: to reduce my workload and to give the players the pleasure of knowing just how good or bad their own roll was. I find it a minor bummer for players to think they rolled really well ("I got a 19!") and find out that it ...


2

There should be consequences happening in game already. How are the characters being resurrected? I find it unlikely that their corpses are just wandering over to the local temple and footing the bill. Do they have NPC allies resurrecting them? If so, then perhaps the players are too powerful to "just" be murdered, and an aspiring assailant would have to ...


1

As asked, yes, you are taking away some player agency. If the player doesn't balk and says "oh, ok," then it's no-harm, no-foul. It might be better to ask the player some questions instead though. Assuming the player isn't just being difficult it might go something like this: "Druids are famous for never wearing metal armor. Why does Swift Bird the Druid ...


5

If you haven't, read Jack of Shadows by Roger Zelazny. It takes place in a world where (some) characters return from the dead. BUT. They can do it only a limited number of times (a number each one knows for himself, but keeps a deep secret for obvious reasons), and when they rise, they rise in a special location, far from their places of power. They must ...


6

Briefly: Based on the content of the question, it sounds like resurrection takes five days. Can you make something important happen during those five days, which would be costly to the dead character or to her player by not being around to participate in it? But: Where did "changing the resurrection system isn't an option" come from? Your players? As the ...


1

Some people have the inability to let go of something they might need. The fear of failing because you don't have it available is crippling. In order for them to get over that fear, try removing the consequence for failure temporarily. I don't know much about your home campaign, but if possible, place them in a situation where they know they cannot die, no ...



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