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5

I'm going straight for the kill. Remove Him From The Group There doesn't seem to be any other applicable answer. The biggest red flag here is that he has already been talked to and ignored the feelings of the rest of the party. This is a major no-no in RPing, at least in my groups. Ignoring the next portion of my answer, this alone is the main reason they ...


2

While you might feel like you're on your last resort right now, this really isn't the case. Your options presented might feel very definitive, but this really isn't the case. Killing his character I.E. forcing him to play a new character. This is not recommended. It would only solve your problem if the problem is the character's behavior, and even then, ...


12

The traditional answer to this is, "Write it down and pass a note." In the 21st century, I might change that to, "Send a text." Of course, nothing prevents your players from passing the note around amongst themselves, or reading it aloud. In some circumstances, "Take one player aside and talk to him or her." However, I think you might be asking two or ...


5

It sounds like you have a problem with players metagaming (acting on information the player has, but his character doesn't), and you're fixing that by having the players explicitly inform each other. This usually works fine as long as players don't have to do it too often – but if you're requiring them to relay the info to the group every time they ...


0

Your player’s characters sound rather well built. In general I tend to be okay when players do this, but if the party becomes internally imbalanced it can be a problem. 1. Without altering the CR of an encounter can we simply rearranging the layout to fix the problem? Some creatures really need to know their own strengths and play to them, especially when ...


0

Delivery technique I usually send out an email to my group between game sessions. There I write a short summary of things that happened in the last session and usually also add some general news from the game world. This is mostly for flavor, but also a great opportunity to drop the occasional hint that is actually useful. Sending out your hints between ...


0

If the players are so apathetic about the current quest they drop it as soon as they hear rumor of anything else, you need more engaging non-overarcing plots. If they don't intend to drop their current quest, just investigate the new one, then that should be very much in line with what you want as a GM. The trick is to make sure their sidetracked ...


0

Run Different Modules When we run 3.5 or Pathfinder published adventures, we always aim for a party of characters half the lowest recommended level. This is quite difficult, especially at higher levels, but it is quite doable and a fun challenge for high-op games. Probably half the expected level would be a bit steep for new players, but some lesser ...


6

There's a huge Chekov's elephant gun you need to be aware of when playing a mystery game: The mystery is there to be solved! There's nothing interesting about not solving the mystery. So since the players are going to solve the mystery anyway, the big question in the game shouldn't be about -if they can-. They can and will. It should be about -how they do- ...


5

Utilize Advanced Creatures. If your PC's are absolutely rolling through the opposition, its clear that the opposition needs a buff to get them on the same level of challenge, this is probably your best bet. This will have them likely digging into the many resources like Hero points that you've provided and up the Ante on any Encounter. At first I would use ...


1

There are many good nuggets of information above. One thing I would like to add that I haven't seen is Use Pre-Builts/Templates. Spend half of the points for them so it steers each character in a certain direction, but allows them some freedom to make it their own special brand of "weird". I've found this especially useful in games that require niches to ...


0

Before character generation, communicate to them clearly what theme you are going for. They can not make characters when they aren't aware of what to expect. Give them restrictions on character creation. Give them a list of properties their characters must have or must not have. The most extreme restriction would be to design some player-characters yourself ...


4

The Same Page tool is often wheeled out as the solution to this type of problem, and it is extremely good at what it does. However, I wanted to talk in more general terms about what needs to happen here. If you have decided on a tone and theme to the game you want to run, you need to... Communicate this as clearly as you can to your players before you do ...


1

Here is what I do, if the players have gone badly off-script and are about to tackle an encounter that is way too tough for them: I step out of character and I address them directly, and I say: "Hey, here's a warning: you're doing stuff the book assumed you wouldn't do, and this is going to be a really tough battle. Are you sure you want to do this?" ...


7

Talk to your players and ensure that everyone is on The Same Page Your players may be creating characters contrary to your setting because they may not realize that your style of GMing is not the same as another game they have played in. Making a Socialite Noble bard in a kick-in-the-door style of game, or a Lich Wizard in a Good aligned campaign are going ...


-5

This sounds like the fault of all the coddling games (and silly action movies) of recent years, not your fault. It also sounds like the players do want to actually play a game with real risks. They're just learning what that feels like. Maybe they'll be more careful next time. I'd keep giving them an actual game with actual choices and actual cause and ...


1

1 Both players were really pissed that they got wounded and lost interest in the game. This does not appear to agree with this, 2 I asked them if they wanted a more cinematic battle where they are the heroes, but altogether they said that the current style (it's dark, rough and dangerous) is what they wanted to play. At risk of sounding like a ...


0

Kill him. Not the player, the character. You are the DM, you are emulating the things for him. If he wants combat, here is the time to find him a stronger enemy. If he wants always the stronger stats, allow him to reach it - but give him more stronger problems, too. He want to play a character, who is super-optimized, here is the time to give him ...


4

You may be playing it exactly right. They got upset when something bad happened to them. Different people handle this in different ways. Your guys got bummed out and withdrew a bit. They recovered and got interested in the game again. It at least shows they're quite attached to their characters. The way to tell if you've done it right is notice if the ...


25

It seems as though the issue here is not that your players were upset by the fact that their characters died, it's that your players were upset by the fact that their characters died even though they wanted to play a "dark, rough, and dangerous" game in which their characters were at risk of dying. Sometimes, people just get upset. Psychology is an odd ...


4

Experiment The way it looks like now, your players don't seem to know what they really want. Therefore, you should experiment. Prepare a session that's extremely grim and dangerous, and another one where they can come out as heroes. This way, judging from their reactions, you can decide for them what they really want. If you want, you could inform them of ...


6

Let's talk gaming philosophy. My belief is that, most of the time, what players want out of combat is to show off how awesome their characters are. Sometimes they might want interesting tactical choices, sometimes they might want roleplaying, but most of the time what they want is to get to actually use their cool new spells and techniques. With that in ...


1

This sounds like a great setup for some really enjoyable character relationships and given where you started from it seems like their differences are probably quite reconcileable IC if you give that the opportunity to happen. It would also give you an option to explore underlying themes of loyalty and the limits of trust and to really develop the ...


2

On achieving immersion: If you can find a movie that mirrors your setting, show a 10–30 minute excerpt of it at character creation to "set the tone". Allow players to specify that things are being done IC or OOC — and allow as many OOC questions as needed. Make it clear that nonsensical actions will be disallowed but not punished. Incentivise ...


2

It sounds like your players are inexperienced with sandboxing. Instead of letting them march to their deaths, divert them. A terrible rain comes up, and a nearby river goes out of its banks. The Evil General moves his camp a half-mile to higher ground. "Well, if you can start your plan, but first you'll have to wade 200' through mud up to your hips while ...


1

Hide the information in plain sight. Make it a part of some boring routine procedure. If the routine changes later due to the evil, they will notice and get curious. Players usually try to investigate interesting or strange events, not routine junk. So you just need to put the overarching storyline into some less interesting facade at the beginning. It ...


1

Remember, you are playing a game - you may be trying to make it "realistic", but that doesn't mean it has to be completely true to life! So, there's a simple solution to your problem: Let the players die. Then resurrect them. Maybe they make it to the banks of the styx, where they are met by [god of the dead] who offers to bring them back to life if they ...


0

I actually use Roll20 for managing combats and dungeons. They have features like "dynamic lighting" that help me manage that. Dynamic lighting is a premium feature, but even with the basic (free) package, you can give your PCs with Darkvision an "aura" with their Darkvision size. Having the big Aura not only reminds you that are in the dark, but also that ...


0

Ok, I have a short answer with what I would do, based on my experience as a DM. I would have the general throw a lot of force at the weakest part of the plan, capturing/killing that one PC. I would have him use enough force that the other PCs can't be pursued too hard without sacrificing the defense of the general. This way you send the message to the ...


0

When my players want to follow up on something that I'm not ready for them to do, I tell them flat-out that it's not ready. However, I phrase it in such a way that lets them know I'm going to send them down that road in the future so they don't feel stonewalled. For example; Player: I want to get on the Holonet and look up everything I can about BigCo. ...


3

How to hint at events outside the scope of the current quest? I have used three tools in the past. In some cases, I stole my ideas from published authors in seeing how they built the background to a story. 1. Rumors & News of War and Disaster. "We have always been at war with Eastasia." "We have always been at war with Eurasia." George Orwell ...


4

If there is a loremaster type character in my group I focus more on lore as a central part of the game plot. If the only lore in the game the group need to progress is for example some historic event you either know about or you don't there is no way to make a loremaster mechanic interesting no matter the method of knowledge transfer you use. Instead I try ...


7

Method A: Do your research. When you are not an expert, you have to become one. According to the wiki rule, there is a specialized wiki for about every fictional universe ever imagined just a web search away. For Star Wars in particular, there is for example Wookiepedia where you can look up lots of trivia about Dantooine or Tatooine. When you have the ...


0

"Obfuscation" Hide your hints/information in larger collections or unrelated and unimportant descriptions. Make it a habit that the world will feed the players a constant stream of information about what's currently going on around them: this could be the archetypal inn keeper, a notice board, the local news paper they see on display, etc. Then if you have ...


2

Many good advices have already been given here, which I'll summarise below. Underneath, I will explain some other techniques that might be useful in your situation. Some very good ways to solve your problems would be: Prevent them from immediately following up on clues. For instance, they hear something suspicious while people are in a hurry, or the clue ...


-1

There are many things you can do to give a loremaster archetype something to do that they choose. Others have already discussed the 'player as GM' and 'loremaster must choose specific questions to ask' solutions, so I will mention a 3rd. Games can range anywhere from groups where you make an assumption that all the characters and players, will be working ...


9

You know what solves a lot of misunderstandings? Just telling the players, as players, so they can focus on the part of the game you intend on. "So, I'm going to paint a full world here - characters will talk about farway places, and events going on. I'm not putting it out there as everything you need to pursue and hunt down - it's not a videogame ...


13

Don't bother trying to prevent your PCs from over-investigating. You want them to go and investigate those false clues, unreliable rumors, and cryptic hints so that they experience the logical consequences of doing so and thus learn from experience that some clues are useful and some are not. When you're a kid simply being told not to touch a hot stove ...


29

A decade or so ago, I had this exact problem playing with new/young players. I came up with a few solutions that worked depending on the group/players. It's admittedly a hard situation because they would assume anything the GM explicitly mentions is usually important. There's one thing I want to ask, but let me answer your questions, first: Explicitly ...


4

I'm a big fan of clipping things to my GM screen for everyone to see. NPC pictures to remind them they have some NPCs along, a ship's mast to remind them "you are all on a ship," etc. For lighting, you could make little pieces of paper with a sun (light), a moon (dim) and just black (dark) and have the relevant one pinned up on the top of your screen ...


5

If the information is solely limited to things the GM has decided - then yes, you are stuck with the mouthpiece issue, as tabletop RPGs are played through conversation, and if only one person can declare facts, then that is what you end up with. However, allowing players to make input can vary greatly in scope, and maybe one of these will work better for ...


4

If you're using a game mat and you're drawing the map out as you play, any room that is dim has diagonal lines in one direction to signify that the light in that room is in fact, dim. If a room is completely dark, draw diagonal lines in the opposite direction and add curved lines in the corners of the room to signify that the room is dark. If a dark room has ...


6

If you use miniatures If you use miniatures, it might be useful to get some kind of small ring (like, cut out top of a cottage cheese or margarine container, leave just the rim) that you can place down around the light sources. Obviously: a) it's not exact, and b) you need to find something a close size for the actual light to your map, but it can serve as ...


15

Using The Lost Mines of Phandelver as an example, here's how I handle such situations. Map I frequently forget elements when going off published maps. So I take the published map, photocopy it, and mark it in a way that makes the key elements of each room impossible for me to miss. For example, if the room is dark, I outline the shape of the room using a ...


6

Option 3, All the Way! You act like option 3 is a joke, but it doesn't have to be. In my campaigns, most of my players write 2-3 page backstories (of their own volition), and I try to help each of them determine how their background fits into the current campaign. I also end up writing 1-2 paragraphs about each important location, event and NPC for my own ...


18

I'm going to take a slightly different tack here, because it sounds like the question is about games where the GM doesn't want to cede the authority to the player to "just make stuff up." And even in games where the GM does, sometimes it's not appropriate. The method I've used, with reasonable success, goes something like this: Keep the information per ...


2

Disclaimer: Which tactic is best depends, as always, on the style/theme of your game, the scope of lore being discussed, and the players involved. Empower the player to alter the setting: Defer to Jadasc's fuller answer: let the player improvise, and treat anything they say as fact unless it contradicts a previous fact/event of the campaign, or a major ...


6

There's not a lot to be done here in the general case. The three options you listed are pretty much definitive. You need to push information from the GM to a player, and it's unlikely that you'll know what information needs to be pushed in advance. You could do something crazy, like write up a comprehensive wiki of your campaign world and give the ...


30

Let the loremaster improvise. Start with the premise that "loremaster" doesn't mean "omniscience" or "retrocognition." There are many things that are not written down, not on the grid, were never recorded in lore, or have simply been forgotten or altered with time. Make sure the player has a solid grasp of the themes of the game. When it comes time for ...


4

I prefer (iv), give the loremaster an overview and then make them ask for more details. For example: GM: "You know this and that about <some corporation>, you also have more details, feel free to ask." Player: "Do I know who is the head of that corporation?" GM: "Yes, you do, it is <that guy>" Player: "And do I also know the ...



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