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1

Trying to get players to do something they don't want to isn't gaming. The primary purpose of gaming is to have fun. The other answers cover this pretty well already, however, so the main reason I interject is to suggest that the question you are asking is the wrong question. I am a reluctant GM, who is GM-ing because no one else wanted the job. The ...


3

We had a situation like this in a previous game (where I was not the DM) with one particular player, and the DM was really pushing it. Afterwards, he mentioned to me not liking to fill in that stuff because he wants to see how the character develops in play, at the table. It wasn't that he wasn't into the game — he felt like the homework was adding extra ...


14

You Don't The problem here is the premise. This isn't school or work. You can't force people to do homework if they don't want to, at least not without creating bad feelings at the table. The single most important rule of gaming is to have fun. Are they having fun when you try to force them to do these things? I don't feel that most of what I'm asking ...


2

I'm not familiar with the system you're using or the game you're running, but traditionally I've used small bribes to encourage players to do stuff like this. If you come up with a detailed background that I can work into the setting I'll give you xp for it. Note that I got hit on the head and have amnesia is not a detailed background, neither is I'm an ...


0

Make it a Magical Beast. Since a magical beast has a higher intelligence score than 2 - it can actually have a character class, and still have the benefit of not speaking. Take for instance, a griffon: Size/Type: Large Magical Beast Hit Dice: 7d10+21 (59 hp) Initiative: +2 Speed: 30 ft. (6 squares), fly 80 ft. (average) Armor Class: 17 (-1 size, +2 Dex, +6 ...


0

I'm trying to incubate my skills so that I can play in a group one day. There’s no need to develop roleplaying skills before playing with a group, and the best way to improve your skills is by playing with a group. Furthermore, the experience of playing a GMPC is very different from playing a PC with somebody else as GM. Along with all the other perils ...


0

I don't see a problem with this. I've played in small groups often, and the GM would usually have a PC involved just to make things more fun for everyone (including the GM). You've just got to remember that the GM PC should be in the spotlight even less often than the other PCs. Back in the day, Blackjack (see ...


0

1st Edition AD&D had Oriental Adventures, which introduced an "Honor" system. This added a "currency" if you will to the existing currencies of coin and XP. Different actions could increase or decrease your Honor, and this could be used to affect NPC reactions, future characters (from the same clan), etc. There are some good suggestions in the following ...


4

I think I see your confusion, and in retrospect, that is somewhat oddly worded given that Location and Dangers aren't really detailed elsewhere. I'm going to start from the root of this, so if one of these sections looks really basic and obvious try skipping to the next section. Use a monster, danger, or location move In Dungeon World, the GM is limited ...


4

Actually while I generally run larger games there is no reason you cannot run a game for three players, you just have to know their limits and choose the right encounters. For example if they are all playing casters then putting out monsters immune to all spells should be avoided. There are a lot of flexible classes in Pathfinder and you can easily get a ...


5

There's more than one way to come up with a backstory. Some of us can be told to write two pages of history and personality and we'll just do it. That's great. But it's not the only way to flesh out a character. I've met players who need a little more prodding. You can do this by giving them a set of questions to answer about the character. A full page ...


18

It's a very good idea As you mentioned, literally all the main issues with GMPCs can be avoided by making said GMPC into an animal. The GMPC is almost non-knowing due to animal intelligence. It does not steal spotlight in non-combat situations because it doesn't normally interact with people that much. Especially not on its own initiative. They may use ...


1

Fronts are how you prep in Apocalypse World. They include choosing names, countdown clocks, custom moves and answering questions that you have about what's going on. Much like MC moves, you look at your fronts when looking for something to say. They provide you with a loose structure in which to make your moves, which is particularly useful when those 6- ...


-2

As others have said, the answer is no. It's impossible to play a DMPC fairly. That being said, Jarenda did a good job of giving some approaches that can work. What I have also done when forced to use a DMPC is to play them almost entirely passively--I basically let the party control them consistent with whatever their motivations are. They never initiate ...


7

DMPCs do often tend to steal the spotlight, but I've seen it work well under a few circumstances. Basically, if you don't want to give your PC an unfair advantage, do the opposite. Give them unfair disadvantages. Trust me, no one will complain about that. The Useless A prominent mapmaker needs to make a map of some extremely dangerous territory. She hires ...


2

One simple question: What is the conflict in this scene and why do I want to highlight it. If there is no conflict, just say it's done and move on. if you don't want to highlight the conflict, roll dice and move on. Should you find the scene both interesting and filled with conflict, go to town.


0

resist the temptation. There is no way that your players will not see this PC as anything other than an all powerful and knowledgeable nuisance.


3

I've mostly played the game in forums, so I don't have a lot of experience when it comes to playing the game in real-time. Like you, I've generally found the fronts a pain. But that isn't to say that there aren't some good stuff to say about them. First off, they have the threats which are a good inspirational tool, in that they get you (or at least me) to ...


1

You could try to have the rations give a small bonus. If there is a boost involved, the players are more likely to be interested. As an example: Divide food into three categories: Hearty, Energizing and Comforting. If the character eats hearty food, he gets a +1 Fortitude bonus. Energizing food gives +1 Reflex, and Comforting gives +1 Will. Then each ...


9

Short version: No. Slightly longer version: Anything you are treating as not-an-npc is not an npc and therefore takes spotlight from players and therefore is bad. If you are scrupulously fair about it, the character is basically just an npc that travels with the party and helps frame and put spotlight on players. If you aren't, then you are taking ...


6

You Can't. There is absolutely no way that you can run a DMPC fairly. There are many reasons for this, a few being: You know everything about your world as the DM and it's impossible to keep character knowledge separate from DM knowledge Since it's your character you'll get attached to it. You'll want to protect it and watch it thrive. You'll be tempted ...


-1

I've had to do this with many RPG's. I GM often, but when times are tough, I sometimes have to fill in for another player or play a character in the game. It very simple once you get the hang of it. Let say your playing Pathfinder with your wife, and she is a lvl. 21 Human Fighter. You can introduce a reoccuring nemesis to the story, like a demon lord that ...


4

It seems like the obvious answer here is to give the characters something that they can ACCOMPLISH. Whatever your motivations for things so far, it's clear that the party is basically battered by events. They feel like they are adrift at the mercy of whatever happens to them. The cure for this is to set up some situations in which the party is clearly in ...


9

The word that comes to my mind is 'ALLIES'. The ally is an NPC that wants (or needs) the group. They can help in three ways A) Offer themselves to the group as a wandering helper. A person who wants to travel to the city you are going to will welcome the extra security. B) Offer them equipment to help the part. It could be a character's parent (mum!) ...


0

Every game has a different focus. If it's supposed to be roleplaying heavy, often those games succeed when both the GM and the players are pushing roleplaying. The players should be asking questions of NPCs, sharing their personal stories, or thoughts, etc. Now, the reason most players might NOT be doing that is they may be stuck on "mission-based" gaming ...


7

Involve the players What strikes me as I read both of these situations is that the players seem only tenuously involved in the events that occur. The major action seems to be on your side of the screen, or in the hands of the dice. In any game, this will tend to make players dissatisfied, because there seems to be little reason for the players to actually ...


-1

Sure, change everything you like as long as (i) the players are aware that your game does not follow the cannon after X date, and (ii) that your changes are internally consistent. The former is easy but can get players' back up when an NPC acts in a different way that they imagined said NPC would act. But this is just expectation and can easily be ...


1

The previous answers have already explored the inter-kindred (or high-level if you will) political and social ramifications of control of a major international airport well, but they do not cover three other factors: How the airport fits into local politics The operational aspects of being in control of a major airport How PCs fit into the airport's flight ...


0

Keep in mind that a DM can have players roll dice or make any sort of check they want AT ANY TIME. So that Perception check? It's possible there's someone hiding in the room that the DM will decide has or has not been detected based on the check. It's also possible, particularly if the DM wants to mess with the players' minds, that there's nothing at all in ...


1

For the SPECIFIC example of breaking down a wall with your bare hands, this is handled directly with RAW: a 1ft-thick stone wall is a DC 35 Strength check, and a 6in wooden wall is a DC 25 Strength check. (DMG p35, RC p175) At level 30, a character who started the game with 8 Strength and never increased the ability (except at each tier increase, where ...


-4

In general I avoid saying something is impossible. Want to punch down that wall? Sure, go ahead. Start rolling damage. The wall is a lot harder than your fist, though, I'll be generous and only apply the same damage to your fist as to the wall. Since I don't know the 4e rules I don't know exactly what's happened with hardness but I would figure the wall ...


0

Just to add my twopenneth; A couple of things to consider: (As I wrote into my comment above) Try using descriptive terms for the difficulty of the manoeuvre (e.g. Mundane, Moderate, Hard, Severe, Insane, Ridiculous) Remember that in reality your own ability to assess the amount of skill required to perform a manoeuvre clouds as the task becomes more ...


0

Wealth, I agree with the idea that starting out the players may actually start out with low quality items, and that is a good idea but such probably will cost less. Maybe half or three FORTH's if there are no current game systems about it, with critical item damage failures, but even then. The players are wealthy why? Even if the characters are low class ...


4

It's entirely appropriate to tell them. It's also entirely appropriate not to tell them. Some games (particularly ones with a more tactical emphasis) are run with all dice out on the table and all difficulties announced a head of time. That allows players to make informed tactical decisions. Other games focus more on the role-playing, the mystery, the ...


0

I found this in Vampire the Requiem 2e, p275 Twist: The Will to Achieve In this option, Aspirations are front and center, as part of the Willpower mechanic as well as the Experience system. To use it, have the players assign each Willpower dot to an Aspiration. Divide as equally as possible; the one or two leftovers can be assigned as the ...


12

A big part of it is what the character could assess from the situation. A character knows their own ability and understands the world around them. For instance, climbing a wall, you can assess the building material, the abundance of footholds and the effectiveness of your equipment. Your character could see that it is a DC 15 and then decide whether their ...


-3

My usual answer to rules lawyering is to remind that player that the DM is basically like god in D&D and everyone knows that if you bother a god enough he'll make a rock fall on you doing 200d6 roll-a-new-character damage. That usually makes the character shut up about it for a while. If not the DM makes us do spot checks anytime we walk near a mountain ...


10

It depends on whether or not the players should have that information, or not. And that depends on the game you are playing and/or the contract you have with your players about that. In general, in a role-playing game where you are the game master (GM) with more knowledge than the players about the situation, you may want to mainly decide this based on ...


25

It depends on your style When I first ran my first game, I kept all the rules transparent. Barring some things that could reverse-engineer the NPC's I didn't want them to be able to gauge, I let every last thing be entirely known to them. "You need 3 successes (we were playing Shadowrun) at TN 6 to sink all the damage" There is nothing wrong with giving ...


3

I don't think there's any official ruling as far as this situation is concerned in AW. At least from all of my searching when this came up there were not. What I did find was: A thread on Story Games. Sage LaTorra's take for Dungeon World The start of a Samurai World hack That last one is important- it informed my take for my world. My original take ...


2

The author of Dungeon World, Sage LaTorra, addressed this question in a thread in 2013 or so. The general consensus of that thread is the following: Go back far enough in the fiction to where you can determine that one character is more capable or more prepared to go first. That player goes first. If the answer is "both players are truly simultaneous," ...


3

Acting first in a PvP situation is not like other RPG's in *World games. There are no "turns", so taking the "first turn" does not confer an advantage or an edge. As the MC, you should ask both players how they dive into the contest at hand, and decide on how that resolves. If any moves are triggered, go ahead and have them roll it. Remember, no moves, no ...


1

Let's talk about this first from a genre standpoint. Most manga/anime deals with multiple major bad guys by splitting them up into arcs. A bad guy group gets a whole arc, which is pretty much like a full campaign. When the arc ends, the bad guys might still be around, but they're no longer the primary driver as a threat - they've either been defeated ...


5

Use physical props. Here's what I use: (Custom made from Dapper Devil.) Having tokens to represent Willpower and Vitae means that players get used to receiving them and handing them over. The tactile nature of them means they can view them as currency to be traded.


8

I had this problem in an Exalted game (which is virtually the same system, if you're not familiar), and it took a while before they got in the habit of using Willpower for important rolls (although saved Willpower is a bit more important in that system, so that could be a reason). A few tricks I used to make sure they knew it was a resource meant for them ...



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