New answers tagged

0

Most prohibitions have some sort of penalty associated with them, or they've acquired penalties with successive editions of games (such as applying a negative to various spell uses when wearing metal armor). My answer then is to give them a message that ties the action to the penalty. Metal armor does not seem like a 'taboo', but rather a reflection of a ...


2

Yes, but.... YES, saying to a player, "your character would not do that," and then enforcing it denies their agency. I see no two ways around this, no sleight of hand phrasing in the denial that will change this. If the GM tells a player their character would not do something, then the character choice is no longer being made by the player, but by the GM. ...


12

Unequivocally yes You can and should remind the player of what his or her character would know—“you know that doing this is going to have serious repercussions, like X, Y, and Z”—but the choice (including the choice of how to think about that) is the player’s and the player’s only. Situations where the character knows something, but the player does not, ...


2

D&D is a game which enables players to do anything they can imagine (That is within their characters physical means). Telling a PC simply 'no, you cannot do that', is not a good way to DM, it breaks the suspension of disbelief. If that druid wants to put on that chainmail, so be it. They should know their character, and that a druid shouldn't wear that ...


3

As is so often the case, I believe the answer to this question is more nuanced than a simple yes or no, and it depends on the precise circumstances. Does what the character is doing impact on the RAW requirements of a class, power, feature etc? For example, lets say that the requirements for being a druid specifically state that they cannot use any metal ...


27

Yes -- if you use that specific phrasing, "your character would not do that", you are denying their character's agency. Rather than use that phrasing, you should go a little deeper and explain why, in your world, the player's character would not do that. For example: Druid: I put on the chain shirt. DM: You think about putting on the chain shirt and ...


1

The premise of the OP's comment itself is flawed -- while a Druid may not voluntarily choose to wear metal armor or take up a metal shield under normal circumstances, there are factors that can work against that rule: (IC) Force. Some would-be captor trying to keep a Druid from wriggling out of their grasp would be likely to use the rules surrounding ...


5

No ... and here's why. I have said (How to get players to do something without them feeling railroaded?) that agency is: Players making informed meaningful decisions that have reasonable consequences that can be foreseen Assuming that the player was informed about the capabilities and limitations of the druid class at the time their character entered ...


0

First, you need to know why Alice is doing this? Possibility 1: she likes the attention and adding humor to the situation. If this is the case, then there is a disconnect between the goals of the party and the GM (conduct a serious game) and Alice and, depending on how it's affecting the fun of the players (don't fix it if it's not broken), this should be ...


1

One method: http://www.d20srd.org/srd/spells/detectScrying.htm Duration: 24 hours You immediately become aware of any attempt to observe you by means of a divination (scrying) spell or effect. The spell’s area radiates from you and moves as you move. You know the location of every magical sensor within the spell’s area. Not much can beat a ...


1

One good low-level countermeasure is to sleep in a rope trick space. This space is not part of the Material Plane and thus cannot be teleported to. I don't think plane shift works either since nobody is likely to have a planar tuning fork keyed to your rope trick space. Certain creatures might be able to play games with vision-blocking effects. For ...


1

There's a couple different options on how you could curtail this activity. I liked the mutually assured destruction method above as well. Like all spying and espionage, eventually, the other side learns your techniques and will do something to counter them. One way, would be to set a trap for them. You are the DM, you can come up with the reason why, but ...


4

Anything PCs can do NPCs can do You can just have your NPCs take the same precautions that the PCs do against this. If the PCs take no precautions then by all means kill them dead and the problem goes away. Example; They wanted to defeat a pirate fleet. simply found out who the captain was, waited till they scryed on him sleeping, then teleported in ...


1

First, don't assume the players are ever going to do things the way you expect them to. You've taken away your options. Now, you have a few options. If you need them all to meet up at a certain place, either start the adventure at that place or, if this is mid-game, place the spot right in their tracks so they won't miss it. Place it inside a narrative. ...


2

Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition is a game that changes significantly at different ranges of character levels. Low level games are very different from mid level games, which are different from high level games. Eberron is a campaign setting best suited for low level characters, precisely because it's designed with mystery investigations in mind. High ...


5

Hum... Mind Blank? In the case of scrying that scans an area the creature is in, such as arcane eye, the spell works but the creature simply isn’t detected. Scrying attempts that are targeted specifically at the subject do not work at all. If your villain is strong enough to attract the attention of an 18th-level party, then I would assume she has ...


2

While not a rules-based solution, you can always make the intended targets of the scrying/teleporting either immunue to or aware that the PC's are doing this. An example from Critical Role: the PC's attempt to scry on a beholder to learn his whereabouts. The beholder is aware of this and talks back to the PC through the scrying ritual, taking them by ...


0

To make this involving across the group and to make the importance of religion clear, keep nudging your players back to those themes. When one of them make a decision just ask "how would your god feel about this?" "Are you following one of The Precepts now?" and use that to explore how the characters interact with religion. If it is a religious society then ...


0

There are a lot of good answers here, but there are some things that haven't been mentioned. Religion plays a big part in the life of those who are a part of it, if not controls most of the actions of one's life. In most religions, you are going to have some sort of prayer, and dedicate time to that prayer. Some religions only pray on certain days ...


3

Churches have hierarchies and structures like kingdoms, and even among true believers in the same gods, there can be power struggles, factions, disagreements. You could have the order become divided. You could have a corrupt person become the leader of the organization (especially if the God isn't an interventionist God or hasn't been seen for a while). ...


16

One way for religion to matter, as you suggest, is for it to cause adventures. At a surface level, this is no more difficult that getting any other factor to cause adventures-- Give that factor power and the authority to hand out quests or obligations, and go from there. Even the narrow history and literature of western Europe presents several broad ideas: ...


10

Religion can lead to a lot of adventures in real life. (The Crusades come to mind...) The key, I would say, is that you think about the values and culture beyond just the trappings. Is the religion evangelical, with mission trips abroad? Large, with important conferences and councils? Are members dedicated to local service in the community? Are they ...


2

Alice's behaviour could be considered a viable strategy, and the contrast with more careful and methodical characters can actually be good for the story, after all the mismatched partners trope is pretty common in crime drama. There is also a big difference between one player not taking the game seriously and a role-playing a character who doesn't take ...


0

Alice's random actions can have unforeseen positive consequences. The player characters have the advantage of surprise. (Enemy) NPCs are baffled and make mistakes that help the party; e.g.: The player characters are having difficulties finding the enemy spy. Alice suddenly decides to drink a potion at the banquet. A servant gasps and speaks to Baron ...


2

There's two ways to handle this, in the meta and in the game. You should do both. Meta The basic steps here are find out what Alice wants out of the game and why she acts like this and then check with your group that in general this idea meshes with them as a whole. If it does, you're done with the meta. If not, you need to discuss what compromises can ...


9

Rather than think of players like Alice as a distraction, take the opportunity to inject a little spice in your games. It's a nice chance for you to break up the pacing before it gets too same-y. The best way that you can make unpredictable, explosive, reckless characters like that shine, is in situations where planning and careful consideration won't do. ...


6

Imagine this: there is a big red button in the middle of the room. Does that player have to press it? If they do, than you can probably predict their behaviour in most other situations, so you can set things up specifically for them and plan for suitable outcome ahead of time. Hopefully you can keep them amused and occupied, while advancing the plot in a ...


29

I had a character like this called Mandred. At one point the party was hidden in the forest waiting for an elven army they were avoiding to march past and he decided to cast glitterdust on them and try to convince them he was the rightful heir to the throne (I should mention he was a Chaotic Evil Human Sorcerer). He failed his buff check (somehow :P ) and ...


6

I run D&D 5E combats describing distance in multiples of 30 feet, calling these "moves". Most spell/weapon ranges are in multiples of 30 feet. I made throwing weapons (normally a range of 20/60) have a range of 30/60 for simplicity. Since 5E doesn't have concepts like "5 foot step", the approximation is OK. "The archers are two moves away." - means PCs ...


-1

I also started once with a tournament. One of the characters was a prisoner whose only hope was to enter the tournament to secure his freedom, another was goaded into entering the tournament by his brothers (2 other PC's) for the tourney winnings and the last player had a debt to pay. I created several basic NPC's of various levels and various classes we ...


0

I have had troublesome players in my games. The worst example would intentionally rebel against anything he perceived as plot. This made running games with the guy a hassle. (Plenty of people simply didn't invite him to their games) The answer I used was essentially the same thing as my normal approach: all roads lead to plot. This does not mean that ...


0

I'm just gonna say it. Remove him from the group. Usually that's the last resort answer. These types of games are social ones, and social problems do arise. It's important to try to work them out. It sounds like you have tried though. From what you have said, he's fine as long as he gets his way. It's when he doesn't get his way that these negative things ...


3

I think that in writing out the question, you've already taken us halfway to the answer. Let's rearrange the info you gave us in roughly chronological order: He's an experienced player, and usually plays in games that don't really challenge him or his characters. In those games, he's fine and doesn't argue with the GM. You, as his little brother, invite ...


2

Looks like your brother might be a munchkin. I don't want to be pessimistic, but if it is true, then you have a great problem which unfortunately may be never solved. Goddamn it! You are the Game Master! You must point him out that you are the Game Master of campaign, not him. You are the one creator of this world. He is just a player and should act like ...


8

Pre-warning - I have little experience as a DM dealing with difficult players, but I'm getting pretty used to dealing with difficult tables in general. A couple of things we found really handy for our horde of uncooperative players: Talk it out / Remind him You said in the comments that: I have talked to him about it before. He seems understanding ...


-2

Put the Player Characters in the thick of it. This will require buy in during character creation; they'll need backgrounds that would support volunteering or being drafted into an army. Build a war, with objectives that can be assigned or picked up by the party such that they work on the periphery of the larger conflict. Depending on how they like to ...


1

General Advice: Use a system with simple rules. The more rules the players have available to them, the more they tend to rely on them. When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. The less game mechanics the players have to use as tools to "solve" an encounter, the more incentived they are to come up with creative and more narrative ideas. ...


4

How can I keep these players entertained, while still ensuring that the party is in danger? (e.g. I want characters to fall unconscious if their plan fails). First off, these are not the same thing. I'll get to that after answering as asked though. Steal from Dungeon World. In DW, when a player drops they see beyond the veil of death and then roll to ...


12

As a preliminary note, a good solution to this problem will (as usual) involve talking to your players. Ask them if they think this is even a problem, and if so, what kind. You may find that they enjoy being reckless and don't mind dealing with the consequences, even if that means inaction or even death for their characters. If so, congratulations: you're ...


27

Give them an NPC to control until their own character can rejoin the story. If there's an NPC ally in the scene, that'd make a lot of sense. But more likely and perhaps even more fun, you can give the player an enemy to run in the scene! Hand them your notes for one of the NPCs and let him or her spend some time on the dark side. This lets the player ...


1

I agree with everyone who told you it's a very bad idea, and especially with those who advised you to let the players make the story. Personally, I always think Pen&Paper RPGs should be MMORPGs in most of the cases. As in MMO with story, like you know it from PC games like MineCraft, where you can play whatever strategy you want, in order to get into the ...


3

Yes, with some caveats First, you're going to need player buy-in if you want to use fate/fortune to guide the PC's towards the story as you have it imagined. The option to play a game 'on the rails' can be enjoyable, assuming everyone involved is willing. Second, the fact that fortune is getting in their way needs to be known to the players, if not to the ...


10

Friend, never do that Gornemant of Gohort, Perceval, The Story of the Grail The problem with players going off the rails is the rails. The advantage traditional role-playing has over video games is the shared storytelling. Lean into that advantage whenever you can. If the players "go the wrong way," or refuse to take hints, you might be tempted ...


2

As most others have said, bad idea. But there can be cases where this can work, and be a good idea. Specifically, where there are in-world reasons for this punishment. But, be careful. If the witch has put a curse on the party to perform the quest or face ill luck, then they might rebel harder, and go off questing for a way to reverse the curse. They might ...


10

I agree with all of the answers here, but they fail to address another reason this is a bad idea: Not only will your players not like it once they figure out what's happening, there is no good guarantee that they will even understand that they are experiencing bad luck because they are wandering off script. The message you are sending with this technique is ...


2

I had a play experience where I personally elected to make my character unlucky. Statistically, they were designed to always fail every luck-based role, and always get the worst of every situation, for no other reason than 'it would help move things along and make things interesting'. The important thing to note here is that all of this was my decision as ...


7

For me, the answer is no. I do not see my job as GM as one of creating plotlines for the characters to follow. My job is to create the world for them to inhabit. I create antagonists whom they may choose to oppose. I create mysteries they may choose to investigate. I create sites they may choose to explore. I create hooks to suggest goals to PCs that may not ...


3

I understand it can frustrating to have your players deviate from your well-planned story, but nothing prevents you from tweeking it a bit so it fits the players' choices and advancements, without forcing them into doing anything. For example, if the party decides to go to the left instead of the right, you could just switch the rooms around, and they'd ...


13

I think everyone who has started GMing has had the same concerns. My personal recommendation regarding your idea of making players unlucky when not following the main plot is to do the opposite: A wizard wants to brew the greatest potion? An alchemist in league with the BBG has years of research that could be vital to their task. A warrior wishes to ...


4

It depends on what you want your game to look like. There are different kinds of roleplaying games, but what matters here is how much you want to world to be realistic. If the world is very realistic you can't "cheat" to make them follow the plot. The plot will have to be strong enough for the PC not to derail from them. Here I call realistic worlds that ...



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