New answers tagged

0

Add guardians to the trap, someone who will attack or harrass players as they try to overcome it. Suppose the party has to cross a pit: most of the time, they'll do this one-by-one, rather than all fly/leap/teleport to the other side at the same time. Have hidden enemies step out and attack them when they've effectively been split into two smaller and ...


10

You are not the first GM thinking about this, and there has been quite some discussion about it on Barf Forth Apocalyptica, the forum run by Vincent Baker. All quotes below are taken from posts there. There is one thread discussing specific examples of how this move can be made real, which is where most of this insight is from. Most MCs there play the move ...


-6

I never played Apocalypse World, so I may miss the attended ambiance of the universe. I supposed it was a fallout-like ambiance with a humourous tone over a dark setting. Several solutions are possible, some could be better than others depending on you, your players, and everything. The gentlemen agreement. As a player sometimes I happen to be in ...


1

Something else to keep in mind is magical means of detecting and disabling traps. A lot of people seem to forget that it is possible to disable and detect traps magically, despite it being potentially costly as well depending on caster level.


3

If environment allows, spread the traps over a larger area. For instance, if there is normally a single trap in a 5' wide hallway, instead, increase the size of the hallway, and put two traps side by side.\ Alternatively, a cheesy solution for people who like to play gnome/halfling/short rogues is to put the trigger for the trap higher up, where it will ...


8

Depends on the party composition. Rogues here refers to any character with Trapfinding and ranks in Perception and Disable Device. 1 or more rogues When there are rogues in your party, traps become basically a rogues-only minigame. The rogue gets to roll Perception and Disable Device, everyone else gets to stand around and wait for the next combat to ...


11

There are many tricks that will help you remember, but most of them boil down to two things: Focus on the important stuff and write things down. That being said, here are a few more detailed pieces of advice that might help you. 1: Get rid of clutter I don't know anything about the Death House, but it seems to be a large mansion with a lot of rooms. The ...


0

During my long experience of RPG (around 20 years) I have had such problems time to time. It was actually the reverse: a couple of "Beer & Pretzel" gamers would join the group and spoil the atmosphere by playing too "lightly". It is all a matter of being in sync with the rest of the group, so it is the new "orthodox" gamer to be out of place in your ...


5

Let the players' (and your) imagination do the work. While the Devil might be in the details, he's irrelevant here. Paint with big brush strokes. Let the imaginations of the players fill the gaps. And let the players add to the environment! For example: You enter a kitchen, the smell of cold roasted meats and fat permeates the place. Over in a ...


4

The biggest thing that helps me with remembering areas is visual factors. Instead of trying to read it from the book, you could create a simple map, set of dot points of important items, or have a page of "reminders", or even combine all three. Before the session, set out what you want from each area. Are there X amount of key items they need to find? A ...


4

It's very important to remember, above all, IT IS A GAME. The worst possible thing you could every do is take "totally fun and awesome Friday night game night" and turn it into "forced, no fun, role play night" First explain that in this group meta-gaming is part of the fun. You want to throw cheesie-poofs, laugh out loud, and make silly decisions based on ...


9

"Hi Pete and welcome to our group. We play differently here and metagaming is encouraged here. I hope you won't have much problem with it. I am sorry if this is not what you were looking for, but I'd encourage you to give it a try anyway"


38

metagaming was the worst thing that could happen in role-playing Well, this is just plain wrong; not having fun is the worst thing that can happen. It sounds like you're finding this out. I think you recognise that there is no right way to role-play or, more precisely, there are as many wrong ways as there are gaming groups because no group is ...


51

There are so many ways to enjoy roleplaying games that we sometimes — often, actually — forget that fact and just assume that how we play is the way. Unsurprisingly, this results in unpleasant things when different ways to play collide and nobody notices that hey, maybe these are different and don't mix well! What you (personally or as a group) need to do ...


3

Two players are giving hints to others even when their characters aren't around. As this is cheating for me, they have been losing some EXP for it You haven't mentioned what the nature of the "hints" are, so I'm making some assumptions here. If they're things that those players' characters know and have had no opportunity to communicate to the other ...


3

Premise: I absoultely agree with the solutions promoted by BESW (currently ahead) and with several others. Talking with the players and solving the problem out of the game is king. I will however show you two other possible ways to mitigate or prevent the problem. The first is just marginally better than yours. It only works with minor metagaming ("Since ...


1

I find that both my experienced players and my new players benefit from encouraging roleplaying the character, instead of rollplaying. The example usually given is that a switch for a trap is accessible by players because that's how D&D works - the DM wouldn't dare NOT put one in, because that would make it unfair to the players and make the DM out to be ...


1

As others have already said here it sadly boils down to a social problem and not a problem solveable by game mechanics. I had a similar case myself where I just put out 0 xp to the guy in question time and time again but still he didn't learn until he was thrown out of the group. That experience aside it sounds like you had a solid group and the addition ...


3

I will give one bad way (in my experience) to handle it, so you are not tempted to try it: Separate the players based on player character location. This sort of meta-gaming used to bother me a lot more than it does now, and I would fret about it and try to prevent it by calling players to the side or even into another room for extended stretches. It ...


7

The game mechanics that have the most benefit are incentives. Reward the player that plays with role-playing as their focus. Give an indication or hint as to why the reward is being added. "As character X has made this decision, he/she finds X reward as a result." As a result you have encouraged good role-playing instead of decisions based on gaming. ...


28

What you're running into is the difference between social costs and economic costs. Typically, the 'cost' for metagaming is a social one. When you metagame in a group that doesn't like metagaming, your friends get disappointed in you, and you feel embarrassed and ashamed for ruining other people's experience. What you've done is effectively replaced that ...


55

I'm going to make one critical assumption about your gaming group. If it's untrue, I don't know if my answer will be helpful: The friendship of the people at the table is more important than the game you're playing. Going forward I'm assuming you're all friends foremost, and you play games as a form of mutual recreation. Now, on to my answer. TL;DR: This is ...


6

It just shows how bad of a punishment XP loss is. There are some groups where that would work, but more often than not it doesn't. I would have done the same: if you can buy (or share with a friend) a vital info for your XP, why not go for it. It's likely that by taking away their XP you didn't show they can't do it, you just showed they can, for XP. Not to ...


0

My website Scabard, an RPG Campaign Manager, is backed by a graph database called Neo4j, a flavor of NoSQL. This allows me to easily write fairly complex graph-based queries with their query language, called Cypher. Your "rumor engine" idea is the type of thing graph searches are good at. And since the idea intrigued me, I gave it a go. I created a Query ...


1

I don’t think magic makes trials useless. Almost any magical impact on the evidence can be detected. Ongoing spells Ongoing spells are easy to detect by Detect Magic. A caster can also determine spell’s approximate level (see Detect Magic spell description) automatically and, being trained in spellcraft (which is usually the case), school of magic (DC 15 + ...


8

"You pass an old crone on the road. She steps aside to let you pass, and looks at you. Suddenly she shouts 'You too have seen it! Oh yes! When? Just a few hours ago? You still have time then! Run! Run to the temple, they may help you!' ". In other words, an unexpected NPC is a solution to all your information dissemination problems.


8

In addition to making a Skill Check, any character who can actually cast Greater Restoration probably knows what kind of effects it is capable of dealing with. If any of your characters have the required class and level, they probably shouldn't have to make a check for it. As another alternative to rolling Religion or Arcana, you could also go for a ...


12

An intelligence (religion) or intelligence (arcana) check should help a character know the properties of a ghost's horrifying visage. How you set the DC is up to you, and is highly dependent upon the campaign setting. Are ghosts a common thing, where many people might know of the effect that seeing a ghost might have upon the victim? Or are ghosts ...


0

You are the analytical guy - so analytical guy, don't over think this one. A lot of people get wrapped up in the notion that RPGs are 100% theater or story and not simulation. You can easily reset that expectation. At the start of the next game, tell the group that you want to bring back 'old school role playing' into the game, which is more simulationist. ...


0

Interesting group dynamic. Here are my short answers as a DM to try and involve a finesse melee character more. Surround your PC group more often. As enemies attack from all angles your fencing champion will move to the front to engage and protect the magic users. Surprise attacks! As your magic users bombard oncoming enemy hoards a few have flanked them. ...


0

You have so many options! You can go nuclear and quit the group but it sounds like you'd rather not. Your humor doesn't match theirs and that's not likely to change. If you want to stay you're going to have to deal with it. Here's how. As a Player Character: Names: Give yourself a ridiculous name like Kernel Sugarbottom. It's difficult to mock the already ...


0

Quick Take. Please don't share your notes as the DM. As a player I'm building a story as well and any "god vision" detracts from that. Players looking to be DM's are of course a different example. Collaboration is a fast track to success!


1

These are all great answers and get to possible root of the player's problem. Here is my simple solution to handle problem "Bob." "Bob, that's awesome that you even know that! Crazy good memory. We don't get much time together though. Is one or two points of AC really worth stopping the game? Look, you guys can do this. You have the tools. Might just need ...


2

I'm going to offer a couple alternatives that I've seen work very well. First, complaining about a DM/GM is incredibly rude to all involved. Interrupting game play for this nonsense is a simple two strikes rule and she already burned one. Next rant is her last at the table. Second, How she hogs the spotlight makes the difference. Is she in character or ...


-4

I have an idea for a totally different approach based on that your setting is not quite plain Medieval but rather Fantasy Medieval, kind of LOTR styled: Remember that Aragorn showed up not quite at the beginning, but once he was there he was part of the main protagonist group? Make an Aragorn. Make the PCs find someone quite powerful, let's say the sun mage ...


0

Let him glory in it! Just plan a few steps ahead, so it gets challenging after he's gotten to enjoy using his toys. Plan to let the PC have his glory, yet face even more or greater challenges. Instead of foiling his plans, plan for the things he's enjoying figuring how to make powerful, work and succeed in ways that will be fun and satisfying for him, but ...


1

A highly optimised character is, almost by definition, highly optimised for one thing only and sub-optimal for everything else. If this is a character optimised for melee combat then make sure your game includes this, ranged combat, social interaction, puzzle solving and exploration in equal parts. Your power gamer gets his time to shine but falls into the ...


5

5e uses a mixture of simulation and design for monster encounter balance. It is true that a creature's AC is determined by its armor, shield, dexterity modifier, and any enchantments (or alternative ways to calculate the AC). However, the balance system gives you what AC you should have on a monster. These seem to disagree. If you equip a CR 1 town ...


4

When you get down to it, the player is arguing from lack of imagination. He said there's no way the NPC could have that AC, and in saying that he failed to take into account a completely obvious means by which AC can be improved beyond the norm (assuming of course that you didn't ignore any rule in giving this item to that NPC). This happens repeatedly, and ...


21

Ask the player why he doesn't trust you Maybe something happened while you were DMing that made him lose faith in you. Maybe something happened in another campaign that made him lose faith in all DMs. Whatever the issue, a role-playing game demands a certain amount of trust by all participants and—as you've experienced—things are uncomfortable if that ...


4

I had a friend who was pedantic... in the same way. In my case - I talked to him. During conversation, my argumentation was concentrated in these points: There are many ways to play tabletop RPG. Actually, here it's not unlike computer game where you host online computer game (for example Mount And Blade: With Fire And Sword) - first of all you choose ...


35

I suspect that there is an underlying issue here which has little or nothing to do with the rules. He's not "lawyering" in the usual sense - probing the DM to see what loopholes he can exploit. What I gather from the description is that he's second-guessing the DM with regards to how difficult the encounter is. Personally, I would do two things. First of ...


20

If you're doing a stage play and something goes horribly wrong, but you manage to hide it from the audience then all is fine. However, if you then tell the audience what went wrong and how you managed to hide it the audience will feel cheated. As if they got a sub-par version of the play. The same can often be said about roleplaying. If the players go ...


11

I will break this down into two parts - personal experience and generic effects. Personal experience Even though I did not DM much campaigns, in those that I did I shared my notes and ideas for the campaign after it ended and answered questions regarding the player's actions after sessions in case the answer did not affect the story any further. I ...


5

I guess it really depends on your GM style. I would never share my notes with players as they tend to be quite loose and can make it seem like there was no overall plan (there is, it's just a very loose series of events that the PCs influence). The other downsides are that I might want to reuse something the PCs miss later (they miss the necromancer in a ...


6

First, it's good if you can find out why the player is playing a non-magic user. You found out it matches his character, which is good, but it might be good to find out what type of gameplay he likes, so you know what to provide and what not to avoid, which might be tricky if you yourself always prefer to player magic-using characters. Some reasons players ...


6

In a GURPS, 3rd Edition game using traditional magic, a nonmagic-using character can feel generally outclassed, especially at higher point values. However, this is usually mitigated by a few factors. Spells usually take at least 1 second of concentration to cast. A magician is often forced to stare off into space undefended because spells come into effect ...


1

Minions! To interact with many things that adventurers could meet, and interact in specifically non-magical, conventional way - they would need tools. Or sometimes you need tools + artisans. But you can't go adventuring with a toolbox - it weights too much for example to scale a wall or to be effective adventurer - to march/run/climb/dig/rest - those kind ...


6

The DM's Call This is one of the cases where there isn't a simple rule like, "After 3 rounds of evassive manuvers... etc..." This really does require the DM to make some calls. Those calls should be based on a few things: How much real damage is done? What is the NPC's motivations? What did the players say, and how persuasive would it be to the NPC? ...


4

Here is how I would handle it - which as far as I can see it not written anywhere under RAW. So my premise is to not break any existing rules, and not take any liberties/assumptions. Please note that "combat" is defined for D&D simply to make it easier, flowing from RP'ing to Combat happens in an instant, and moving back should happen in the same manner. ...



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