Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

73

The GM taking away XP is not really your core problem. Your core problem is the game you want to play as a group is not the game he wants to run. The solution is simple - go find a GM who does want to run that kind of game, or have one of you GM (or take turns GMing) to run that game. Regardless of how "good" of a GM he is, he's not the GM that's good for ...


60

Understand what makes the game fun for your players and then try not to back yourself into a corner where you feel pressure to fudge rolls in the first place. If character death is acceptable to your players then you should feel no pressure to erase a crit. If it is not then you should have death or resurrection mechanics which allow for the player to take ...


54

Probably the easiest way to avoid forgetting a few key things is to use a physical prop. When you have an important bit of information or a "quest item," write it down on a notecard and physically hand it to the players. You're not "giving away" anything if they've already identified the thing as important by themselves. But now they have a handy reminder ...


54

There's a two step process needed here. Say to your players what you just said to us Then mind your own business Have they not noticed that imbalanced loot is throwing off their party balance? Or is it that they don't care? If they do not care and are having fun, it is not a problem. If they haven't noticed, then just telling them "Hey gear is ...


52

Maybe he's a Watcher In the Dungeons and Dragons 4th Edition book "Dungeon Master's Guide" there exists some very useful advice for running the game that is applicable to nearly every RPG out there. One section of advice addresses different player personalities, including the idea of "the Watcher." A watcher is a casual player who comes to the game ...


46

Explicitly define "What's at stake?" Well, it sounds like part of your problem is that you two don't necessarily see eye to eye on the meaning of that roll. In my experience, the best way to approach this is to actually explicitly define the "stakes" of the check before the roll. That means you spell out the consequences of success and failure, then give ...


40

Well first off, to answer your question about magic item limits, a character in 3.5e is limited to two magic rings. Found here: http://www.d20srd.org/srd/magicItems/rings.htm in the very first paragraph. Second, AC bonuses do not stack unless they are different types of bonuses (armor, deflection, shield, etc.) or state that they stack. Usually, you cannot ...


38

I have managed only a couple of times, but as a GM. And the first time is one of my best gaming memories, and one of the reason I keep GMing. It was not in a Lovecraftian setting at all (Exalted actually, making me even prouder), so I won't be able to give you setting specific hints there, but the method can supposedly be applied to any game. I have found ...


35

Let's say I have a campaign where I want to put the players in a challenging spot by putting them in a no win situation and having them captured and stripped of their equipment (assuming they might get it back as they make their escape, so as not to complete make the players mad.) If this is not a natural consequence of previous actions ...


34

Punishment ... wait ... what!? RPG are supposed to be fun. From what is said, the games the GM wants to run and the one the players want to play are different. So, have a assertive conversation with your GM and agree on a game that you all want to play. Be careful to never criticise your GM personally, only things he has done. So never say BAD Your ...


33

I would keep in mind the following: Don't panic! You are almost certainly doing a better job than you think you are Read the rules Start small, a single adventure Consider using pre published material Remember you job is to help the players have fun. Sometimes that might mean you have less fun, unless you get your personal kicks from happy players, which ...


30

Player creativity should always be rewarded! Adding on to what RS Conley has written (and it is an excellent response), as a player of a campaign, you never, ever want to feel like you're non-participatory. As the master of the campaign, it's your responsibility to adapt to good, solid role-playing. If the players are clever enough to outfox a given set of ...


26

Introduce NPCs and plotlines/quests to handle redistribution and to bring the "lagging" PCs up to "speed" via personalized rewards (and, if very, very badly needed, punishments.) Examples: If your ranger has barely any items, run a sylvan quest for whose completion he is given a magic bow made / customized especially for him by a dryad. If it's your ...


24

The question is: Is darkness an important element of the adventure? If yes, then torches may be a rare resource and it can be important to keep track of them. A sunrod could destroy some of the atmosphere and take some danger from the dungeon. If the focus lies on slaying monsters and grabbbing treasure, bookkeeping of torches and their duration may be a ...


24

The new GM is absolutely in charge of the new game. If you want to talk with them privately outside of the game or if they come to you for advice, great, but at gametime you need to play your character and live within the confines of the game as it is. If you've got any tips for getting the new GM over the learning curve, offer to share them. For coping ...


24

Write the story as if the characters were not there. Make sure that all your NPCs have motivations, goals and personalities. This is what would happen if the world was run like clock work. This is your story. Now, add the characters into the mix. Let the story be modified by what the characters do. The NPCs will react, and depending on their ...


24

Aside from being unwieldly, prone to soda spills, sudden gusts of wind and players taking a peekā€¦? :-) Personal opinion: As nice as professionally-printed dungeon maps might be, personally I much prefer sketching the current part of the dungeon on scratch paper as the players advance. This has several advantages: it is clear to everyone that my sketch ...


23

My party also prefers to see dice rolled in the open, so I've had to learn to creatively doctor encounters myself. Change the Numbers Instead of changing your rolls, change the numbers you're adding to the rolls or comparing the rolls to. If you feel you have to justify this, perhaps monster's so mad it takes a penalty to attacks and defenses, or the party ...


23

Usually, players are not supposed to know how hard it is for them to overcome the obstacles they face. (While this is valid for every D&D edition I know of, examples will be about the editions I'm most familiar with, which are D&D 3.5e and D&D 4e) Most DCs for things you want to do are fixed by the rules and everybody knows them. A DC 15 tumble ...


22

Steal a couple and mash them up Colleges and universities are actually, in general, remarkably good about putting their plans online. To make a believable college campus quickly, steal a couple, and mash them up. Then use the building plans featured in the street map for your internal plans. Internal plans: MSU, LaTrobe Library, Melbourne, Colorado State ...


22

I think this shouldn't be a dilemma for you, the GM. It should be a dilemma for the players. If a player can craft a super-secret Alchemy Stone which will single-handedly turn the tide of battle against the forces of evil, then they will want to craft it. However, if it takes two months of intensive work to create, then the forces of evil are still moving ...


21

Unless your players are role-playing a very forgetful party (in which case, I say throw them to the wolves), then it is not the PCs who are forgetting, but the players. In cases like this, I usually follow a simple rule at my table: if it's something that the characters would be likely to remember but which the players have overlooked or forgotten, allow ...


20

Have everyone make notes, and keep a copy of everyone's. Likewise, take a photocopy of everyone's character sheets. Put them all in a folder. Keep that folder safe. In the process of reopening, have everyone read their notes, and share some stories of past character deeds. If you have time before hiatus, wrap up or tie off a bunch of loose ends, but not ...


19

Check out the Player's Handbook rules update. It provides the following clarification to the MarkedDDI condition: A mark ends immediately when its creator dies or falls unconscious. Of course, this makes sense. The idea of being marked is that the creature, for whatever reason, regards the originator of the mark as a threat. This might be because of a ...


19

You're definitely doing all the right things; it's hard if your players don't cooperate. Let's see. The first thing I'd try is starting sessions in media res. You can sort of force a bit of momentum if the night starts with the characters under fire in the middle of a combat, or pleading for their lives in front of a judge, or what have you. At the very ...


19

Making a living in the RPG industry really depends on your definition of making a living. I think there is a lot of potential to make money, but it will likely require a lot of work for not much of an income compared to more lucrative careers that take a great deal of effort. When I think of what you've asked, I think of individuals like Jason Calacanis or ...


19

Figure out why the player/character is being anti-social. This is best handled outside of game. Is the character under the impression that some sort of mind effect would cause his character to go on a killing spree? (sociopathic IN character?) Or was he bored? (killing time!) If the player is bored, maybe he's a hack and slash fighter in the middle of a ...


19

On the one occasion we started a new group from scratch, we all went out to dinner together, during which we talked about what we were looking for in a game and did some basic worldbuilding. Also, it meant hanging out in a social situation and just getting to know each other. If it didn't end up working out, I believe it would be a softer rejection this way, ...


19

4e, like all RPGs is exactly as good as its GM. With that said, it depends on what your requirements are. I've experienced a campaign that went from 1-30 in 4e. It had significant RPing in it. With that said, 4e offers few rules (but a few excellent books on suggestions) of how to guide RP. If you're looking to simulate a world, it's not the best system. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible