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2

One other option you can use grappling for: Grapple a person, then use your action to knock him prone. Everyone now has advantage on attacks against him; he has disadvantage on attacks; and he can't get up unless he escapes your grapple, since grappling costs movement. A fighter or a monk could grapple a person, knock him prone, then go to town on someone ...


1

That's it by the rules. Be aware, though, that there are follow-on consequences, since some things can't be done with a speed of zero. For example, you can't get the benefit of the Dodge action, and if prone, you can't stand up. (Therefore, grappling a prone creature keeps them down.) Also, when I DM a 5e game and grappling comes up, I intend to make it ...


3

Grappling in previous editions was... troublesome. The rule is considerably simplified in 5th edition, and is both easier to apply and less cumbersome in its effects. You are correct that the only effect of the Grappled condition is an inability to move, but that alone is enough to allow the rogue in your party to utilize their sneak attack ability each ...


1

You are missing something The grappler (the one controlling the grapple) gets +5 on his grapple checks - both breaking the grapple and taking control of the grapple use the same opposed check - with the same modifiers (including the +5 to the grappler). There's no advantage in one or the other, you can even roll the opposed check first and only later ...


4

If You Are Grappled If you are grappled, you can attempt to break the grapple as a standard action by making a combat maneuver check (DC equal to your opponent's CMD; this does not provoke an attack of opportunity) or Escape Artist check (with a DC equal to your opponent's CMD). If you succeed, you break the grapple and can act normally. ...


0

Mechanically, the only way to 'hold' a creature is a grab. Grabbing just immobilises the target, and you can take an action to 'try' (making a strength attack) to drag the target. That's the only legal interaction. (short of utility powers, the Fighter power Forceful Drag for example lets you.... drag the creature without having to make the Str attack) So ...


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Anatomically No, almost certainly not. In almost all cases involving two creatures of nominally equal size, trying to do this would simply overbalance the assailant. Mechanically By the RAW, not the way you described I shouldn't think. Mostly for the same reason that you can use a bar stool as improvised weapon, but not the bar. It's just too big to make ...


3

Represent this thematically. Make your multi-target attacks represent this sort of thing without changing the rules. Assume that the enemy is picked up and put down as part of the same attack, and put down in their original spot unless a power allows for it. This would work best for a monk. Some quick ideas for Level 1 powers: Centered Flurry of Blows: Add ...


4

If the creature were willing, you might be able to use him as an improvised two handed weapon (there is no weight max on two handed improvised weapons, if you can lift it, you can hit with it). Presumably a character attempting this would have enough strength to do so. Even so, no matter what, this should require an athletics check to life the creature into ...



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