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0

I would suggest two modifications to achieve your goals, one for your social contract, and one for your game rewards. Tell your players explicitly what kind of behaviour you want. It might seem a little weird, but if you sit your players down during character creation and explicitly tell them that the dynamic that you're going for is a group of people with ...


0

(Don't let your eyes glaze over on this one-- bear with me!) If you strip this situation to its barest essence, what you're doing is trying to set up a game (in the game theory sense) within a game (in the role-playing sense.) What you want, specifically, is a co-operative game (theory sense) within the game (role-playing sense) rather than a competitive ...


1

My technique focuses heavily on how you set up the plot and character resources. To simplify things think in terms of "political capital". This can be different things like: An NPC who owes you a favor Some sensitive information you have on someone that could be revealed, used for blackmail or sold on A membership in some group/society/party that gives ...


2

Bonds in Dungeon World works surprisingly well for this kind of dynamics. The cool thing about Bonds is that you can resolve them, which in game terms means they don't apply any more. When a bond is resolved, you get an experience point and get to replace them with a new bond. Context: In Dungeon World, you need XP equal to your Level + 7 to level up, and ...


2

The first question to ask is, is intra-party conflict the norm in your game? If you're playing something like Paranoia, or if your group just generally expects a certain amount of infighting and backstabbing, then just go for it. For the rest of this answer, I'm assuming that's not the case. That is, your fellow players and GM generally expect the PCs to ...


8

So you want the other sword, and you're thinking about your character killing the other PC who has it, though your character is Good(tm) and likes the other PC. Why? Why do you even want it, if you already have one? Why would you start with thinking to kill your friend to get it? Are you an evil player with a Good character? Are you used to games where ...


9

I like the above answers (and comments) but would like to add, for your consideration, the possibility of making this not just about your character's development, but also the other player's character. The other player isn't a sidekick in your character's story -- he's the protagonist of his. Once you've taken into to consideration whether this will work ...


4

The road to hell is paved with good intentions Imagine how much good you can do when you become half-dragon! You can change the world, and people will sing about you as a hero! All you have to do is do this itsy-bitsy one evil step... But then, there will be thousands of good deeds that will pay it back! Right? Right?... Imagine your character repeating ...


28

Story issues I think the transformation of your character could well work out the way you described it, but I think for such a basic and deep change to your characters morality and basic alignment you also need a very strong motivator/cause. For Anakin that was fear of the loss of the ones he loves, catalyzed by the death of his mother, a vision of his ...


0

I think the answer to 1-5 question is yes, it is appropriate if critiques are made in an assertive, constructive and positive way. But you must keep in mind that even well intentioned and well exposed critiques can hurt feelings, or make someone, if not angry, sad. So, I usually keep critiques to myself unless: The person have explicitly asked for them, ...


-1

You have put a lot of stuff into your question and I have broken it into a number of more concise questions: 1. Is it appropriate for a GM to critique "poor play"? Yes. The GM in a RPG serves a number of functions: a) creator and player of the world b) impartial referee and c) coach, particularly to new players or new to the GM. If the player's and GM ...


5

"...I also expect to be treated with basic civility." This is not someone who wants you to make a better game experience - this is someone who likes tearing into people. If he really wanted to help you, it would be more of a focus on things you can work on starting out (not expecting greatness fresh out the gate), it would be also pointing out what ...


8

We're not sure if you read the situation correctly either Sorry, but I don't believe this question can be effectively answered in this format. Was he really being rude, or were you being overly defensive? There's no way for us to know. We can read between the lines (cancelling your game over his concerns seems a little over-touchy, so there is a warning ...


14

Assuming you told him your thoughts... You've Already Done It And the "it" is to not play with this person anymore You've talked to them. You agree on some points and not others. It sounds like this person's play style doesn't match yours. That's fine, happens to everyone. I consider myself pretty flexible when it comes to play styles and there's still ...


-4

Stop playing Pathfinder, start playing Rifts. Problem = solved. :) Srsly. This groups sounds like a whacky bunch of oddballs all interested in playing their weirdos as they like and letting you the GM sort out exactly how that will work. Alignments create an issue, leveling and PC power create issues, and then the campaign setting creates issues. Rifts ...



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