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1

There's a lot of answers to this, so this solution might already be posted, but I have a mechanic I institute that encourages players to make timely decisions and I find it works effectively. Early on in every campaign I run, I deliberately run a mission in which you have to rescue object/person/creature X. When they players methodically plot and plan the ...


4

To me, the player you describe doesn't sound like a "diva" so much as simply extremely insecure. (Mind you, there's no reason they could not be both.) It sounds as if the player is (consciously or subconsciously) afraid that, unless their character concept and actions are perfect, they will be mocked or chastized by the other, (in their mind) more ...


26

The best way to handle attention-hogging "diva" players is to set limits, then enforce them. Set Limits Divas, whether in RPG groups or in real life, take advantage of the social expectation to be polite and accomodating in order to get away with their behavior. So to protect your own sanity and your game, you need to create an alternate social expectation ...


6

I'll assume that you and your players are on the same page, that they're convinced that this is a fun and interesting approach to playing, and that the sticking point is that even though they're committed to trying things your way, they keep falling back into old habits. In my experience, the best way to change these habits is to change the social ...


7

The best things to do (in "best" order) given your assumptions and question would be: Sit them down individually and play through a mini-session or two with them. Translate what they want into what fits the game Break it to them that perhaps this isn't the game for them and maybe see about finding one that is. Now, on to explanations! I will be using ...


1

Preface You request advice on getting people to behave within the rules of a game. One way to get them to see things your way is to use first principles, which for games is: "A game is defined by its rules." 1. Use Analogies A. Offer the example of common games like checkers, chess or tennis. They all have reasonably concise and well known rules. ...


6

There's three steps, that help you avoid this. 1. Play games you like, with people you like This should apply to everyone at the table. You mention you knew the players didn't get along as people before you even started the campaign. Don't do that. You may like Player A, B, C, and D, but they may not like each other. If you really must play with all of ...


1

Take a break. I will keep it short, since several other very good answers have already been given. Here is some very general advice I believe every (new) GM should keep in mind while running their sessions: As soon as the players can't concentrate on the game for whatever reason, take a break. It may seem game-breaking at first, but I can ensure you that ...


13

So first, a couple of things I would do if you plan on doing something like this from scratch again in the future... The first point I want to make is something I've learned from hard, bitter experience. Some players are incapable of separating inter-PC and inter-player conflict. It doesn't matter what their ages, experience or life skills are. This means ...


3

You would solve this problem in the same way as you solve all conflicts: take a deep breath and a a break, analyse what is going on, then address the problem in a mature way. Taking a break is essential. No one acts like the adult in the room if they are emotional and upset. A few minutes, hours, or even days are probably needed to cool the fires. Allow ...


1

Good job on ending the session early (but sadly not early enough). Your best bet is to talk with both of them and try to find a solution to their problem. (Yes, as a GM you have to babysit, sadly.) If the problem can not be solved easily, just kick them out (one of both). Role-playing is a group activity, and if they can't lower their ego... well, there are ...


2

Well, the very first rule for enjoying any kind of game (imho) is that the players get along well. So first of all I'd recommend you to ask the players to solve, at least up to certain point, their differences. Of course, it falls way beyond the duty of a GM, so if they're not your friends but only people with whom you play role, I'd recommend to change ...


15

(Let me preface my answer by noting (as per Good/Bad Subjective) that it draws more extensively upon my experience playing D&D 3.5 than Pathfinder (which I have only played one serious campaign of, plus a few one-shots), but that I feel the games are similar enough in design philosophy that for the purpose of this question they are equivalent) It almost ...


14

A while back, I spent some time GMing Paranoia. Players aren't supposed to know the rules for Paranoia (mine definitely didn't) so there was little temptation for them to describe their actions using rules terminology, and the mode of play we used occasionally involved taking players at their word and declaring that their stated actions resulted in hilarious ...



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