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3

What I would suggest is that you need aim for what your friends want, or to be more accurate, need, as a change. Now that they're not interested in it would mean they're bored of it, so they want to do somthing else. They need improvements and changes that they expect, not only your ideas. So try re-inventing your game that suits all of the intended ...


5

Try proposing a reboot with a different system. I'm in the same situation and sometime I'm able to convince my old players to restart our abandoned games just proposing a different system. The idea of trying something new on the familiar ground of an old world with old companions, can do the magic and revive interest and motivation in some players.


3

Make them really excited for the new system/setting Our group was in a similar situation several times these last years. On some rare occasions it actually worked out for someone to introduce new systems and/or settings which were then very quickly picked up by other players in GM roles (if not in the very first session they still got into GMing the new ...


0

Unless it is going to take more than 10-15 minutes to run this solo mission, just run it while everyone else takes a pizza break. Edit: To elaborate further, in the gaming I've done, there inevitably comes a point in any session when people want a break to grab a bite to eat, go to the bathroom, smoke a cigarette, etc. Taking such a break when the party ...


0

Does it have to be a solo mission? I once ran a mission where a PC was interested in stealing a prized jewel and was the only one with the skills to pull it off. In your case it sounds like your assassin also is the best suited and most inclined to pull off the kill. That being said, it doesn't mean the others can't help. The mission would focus mainly on ...


0

As long as the amount of solo time spent isn't excessive, and/or the other players have something fun to do at the same time, I recommend and encourage solo and split-group activities. Solo and split activities often make sense, can create interesting situations, challenges and opportunities, add variety, and can lead to good character development and ...


0

I'd propose something a little inspired by the narrative gimmick used by Prince of Persia: Sands of Time (and other games in that series), in which the destination is pre-ordained but there is entertainment to be had in the telling of the story. As unreliable narrators relating how the assassination went, past tense, both you and the Assassin have ...


2

Have some mindless good fun I realize that this is not a generic solution for everyone. But it can work quite well if you get the chance. What you need is a group of people that has a common agreement on mindless fun. And a place to do so. For example, when I was in school, our roleplaying groups consisted of 5-7 people and the group was split up ...


5

Let the uninvolved players control the opposition If nothing will happen while the PCs sleep and the assassin heads off to perform the assassination, continue playing, but give the players whose characters are sleeping control of the foes and have the players defend the assassination target. Then make that engagement fast and simple. This means perhaps ...


3

Concurrent Encounters Twice in my 4e campaign I had situations where a person would be in in single-combat. I solved the issue of splitting the party by running both encounters concurrently, with everyone still playing at the same time, everyone in the initiative order, but with the individual PC in a different location dealing with a different threat. The ...


5

Is the player of the assassin interested in not having the other players know, or just the other characters? If it's the first, as has been suggested, try doing a separate, one on one session for the assassination mission. If it's the second, talk to the other players about arranging a special session where the assassin sneaks away and they take on other ...


12

You are running into a common problem, and not one that has an easy solution, as it depends on the nature of your group. Let me offer you some options. The Solo Session Meeting up with your assassin, either in person or over some form of RP conducive communication tech (Skype, chat room, what have you), you have a micro-session for the assassination, which ...


26

Arranging a separate session is both most convenient and most effective. It's actually most convenient, because it inconveniences two people (you and the player) a little bit, while avoiding inconveniencing even more people (everyone else) by having them sit around doing nothing. Arranging a separate session might be slightly inconvenient for you two, but ...


8

Run short demo games If people are only willing to play or GM in familiar games and/or systems, try running one to three session introduction games. This will take some of the burden of off you in running a full-scale campaign for every new system you want to try, and will give them a chance to experience a "preview" of the game that might get them more ...


24

I've had similar challenges, both with getting group buy-in to try new systems and with getting people to feel comfortable GMing anything at all. My solution was a long-game process of changing the "landscape" of how people at the table viewed their role in the game. I didn't set out to deliberately address the challenges you're facing, but it's ...


3

You could try having them watch others play a new system. As a player this has given me a taste of how the systems work and the tone of the game. There are a few twitch channels where people play RPG's, I've watched most of ITmejp's games which include quite a few different games/styles, most of which have been posted to his youtube channel as well. I'd ask ...


1

You probably can't... they seem like they're all resistant to change. If you want a plan to try even though it might not be advisable: Find a system that your group hasn't played, and one of the guys that GM'd before would be interested in. If he's a horror western buff, Deadlands. If he liked Bladerunner, Shadowrun... Something that really jibes with what ...


4

I don't think the specific SPT you linked to matters that much. The salient part of this question is, "should I discuss important matters of game tone with brand new players". If your problem is not with the idea of such a discussion, but the particulars of the bankuei SPT, then it is trivial to modify it or even make your own SPT anyway. Generally, I think ...


10

I've had to teach a lot of new people how to roleplay. While I don't break out the full Same Page Tool, there's definitely key points I use from it. Notably, the first one is "Do you play to win?" because a lot of RPGs don't do that, which makes them the opposite of most games as we understand it. The second is covering whether the motivation should be ...


5

I think it depends. Some players are going to be more interested in talking about the nuances expressed within the SPT before playing. Other people would be turned off. Some games are perhaps more suited to bringing up some issues touched on by the SPT before play than others. For instance, talking about the approach to character creation might be ...


29

NO It's not overkill, it's awesome. I just used the SPT to kick off a new group. Most (4 of 7) had never played before, and one thought that D&D was some sort of board game. We had a get-together before the first session where we just hung out and talked about media - what games, tv shows, books, etc., we liked and what kind of stuff we would want to ...


8

It is useful but not in its long form. The Same Page Tool goes into a lot of details. It works well for people who have experience of RPG and want to invest a large amount of time into a game. However, there is too much details for a short series of game sessions. When I introduced new players to RPGs, I always had a short discussion with them. In the first ...



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