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0

I almost didn't respond since the top ranked answers were so good, I especially like the soloadventure with players taking NPC roles. However, if the player knows that he needs to accomplish a goal (assassinating an NPC from a list) it is the player's responsibility to accomplish the goal. You have stated that you asked the player which NPC he will target, ...


2

From PHB: "The Great Old One might be unaware of your existence or entirely indifferent to you, but the secrets you have learned allow you to draw your magic from it." It seems to me you don't need to follow or worship your patron in any way, you can just draw power from it so differences in alignment would mean nothing.


0

How Long Will This Team Stay Together? I personally found the conflict between our characters exciting and fun, this is why I play. Do the other players also enjoy it, or don't they? If yes, no problems. If no, work that out first before worrying about abstractions like alignment Just a note about alignment in D&D 5e: it's not a box you ...


1

Fear Your God There's a lot of historical and literature cases where people worshipped a god because they were afraid of the consequences of not worshipping the god. Yahweh would punish the Hebrews with war and famine if they did not worship him properly. When Saul didn't properly exterminate Amalek, Yahweh chucked Israel into a civil war. The Aztecs ...


5

I feel like playing a character of wildly differing alignment than the rest of the party is something that needs to be run by other players in the group. Are you familiar with the same page tool? It deals with addressing what individual players are looking to get out of a game. If players are looking for drama and tension between the characters, having ...


45

So here's my issue: I like my character, I like our party, and I don't want to pull a 180 on my character and make him nice or throw away important motivations for him. Well, it sounds like your character just may be evil, or at least on the evil side of neutral. That doesn't mean he has to do evil things, especially if he has a reason not to. And, if ...


18

I like @clyde's answer because it addresses both the problem you think you have and the real problem you have; the other answers do not but are more correct in the way they address the problem you think you have. So, I'm posting a new combo answer. You Can Be Any Alignment In 5e, there are no alignment restrictions. As a warlock you have no alignment ...


5

Think motivation first. Your druid wants peace and prosperity, you want the dominion of an Old One who will surely devastate and drive mad. Long term, you two aren't going to get along. But in the short run, perhaps both characters want to prevent BigBadGuy from collecting all the Unobtainium. They've different reasons, but you'll work together. For now. ...


17

Yes. Unlike 3.X, 5e has no real alignment restrictions. Good characters can follow evil deities and vice versa, and chaotic characters can follow lawful deities and vice versa (to the extent that chaotic & lawful even mean anything). The trick to cases like this is coming up with a reasonable explanation. Maybe your character sees the deity ...


1

The answer is most definitely yes. There is nothing in the book restricting you from following an evil god and not being evil. Even in 3.5, clerics and the numerous prestige classes associated with them, could be one alignment away from your god. Would it be logical to have a lawful good paladin worship a chaotic evil god? Sure. But the reason behind ...


6

Yes, but it ain't easy. Although there are no mechanical alignment restrictions in 5e, it is very difficult for a character who draws his power from an evil deity to integrate with a non-evil party in a believable way. Evil Gods Require Evil Servants If your character truly reveres, worships and supports an evil deity he or she will find it difficult to ...


4

I like to start with one shots and low-commitment games.* It's a chance to play and try out a few different styles of game, and get a chance to make connections, feel each other out, and talk about what kinds of play you like. It also becomes a chance to see which players are dead set on one style of play, or have boundary issues and want everything ...


2

The best tool is the game itself Before the first session but after the GM's interviewed potential new players, confirmed none are obvious sociopaths, determined some players' likes and dislikes, and informed players of some of his likes and dislikes, the GM should make available electronically background information necessary to participate effectively in ...


1

Get to know one another, then draft a Social Contract Introduce yourself. Tell the group who you are, what you do, how you came to be a GM, why you are interested in GMing for a group of players, and the expectations that you have for the game. Once your players get to know you, have the players do the same thing. Build the bonds of friendship and get to ...


26

Let people talk While experienced groups often have a rule that says "keep out-of-characters banter to a minimum", that can go out the window for a fresh group of strangers. Give people chances to chat. That means keeping a big gap between "everyone is here" and "let's start the game", so people can get to know each other. It also means pausing the game for ...


10

When I'm in this situation, I just wanna talk with my players, ask some basic questions, and listen carefully. First, I gotta make sure I schedule time for this. The orientation discussion should never feel rushed because it's eating into gameplay time. I have great success with pre-game rituals and this can set precedent for them if you want. I've got a ...


2

A Tool to Enable Consensus Decision Making Problem: your group fails to make timely decisions due to a consistent failure to reach a consensus Desired Remedy: A tool that helps alleviate this detriment to fun gaming. Proposed Tool: Options Identification Process and Voting Tool (see below) Requirements: Buy-in from GM and players on the particular voting ...


1

If you get a chance, I'd recommend checking out the game Divinity: Original Sin. It features a mechanic based around exactly this sort of problem. When the two players disagree on a particular approach, they can each declare how they'd go about solving the problem - this allows the two characters to build up their relative scores in various attributes. One ...


7

Give the party a way to identify these situations where an argument is ongoing with no new information is being introduced, and a mechanism to decide on a particular course of action regardless of the individual members preferences. Fortunately, when all relevant arguments and points have been put forth, mature players will recognise it. Or at least, they'll ...



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