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I would say no, unless someone has CLW on their spell list and does not need to use UMD to activate the wand. There are a number of options to resolve your healing problem, though: Instead of a wand, create a worn magic item (or set of items) that contain healing charges that are either limited or have a number of charges per day. You can choose to give ...


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The question only asks about "healing" wands yet the details of the question cover Cure Light Wounds in particular. Though as long as you have a Wizard, Sorcerer, Magus, Summoner or Witch you don't need a wand of Cure Light Wounds, you only need a Wand of Infernal Healing. As it's a spell on their spell list they can cast it with no check needed. Fast ...


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A wand of cure light wounds can substitute for a healer, but it's risky to adventure without someone who can also heal A wand of cure light wounds costs 750 gp, making it beyond the means of a party of newly created level 1 characters. Nonetheless, this answer assumes the party gets such a wand anyway from, like, a friendly squirrel or whatever. This answer ...


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This article deals with healing in D&D 3.5, but there should be enough overlap to make some of it useful in Pathfinder. As the article demonstrates, most of the party's healing can be taken care of with a few simple items, leaving you free to focus on cranking out the buffs. It brings up a question though.. You are a pacifist. The others are not. Are ...


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Level 1 Dread Necromancer, and the entire party takes the Tomb-tainted Soul feat. Post battle, the Dread Necro goes around and pokes everyone with Charnel Touch (unlimited, at will) to heal a small amount of damage each use. 1 HP/std action, +1 HP/4 DN levels. Result: Everyone that survives the battle is promptly restored to max HP. The Pros are that it's ...


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Even with full charges, and some way to use it reliably (house rule on UMD, or a class with Cure Light on its spell list), a Wand of Cure Light Wounds will probably not last very long. It will, however, last plenty long enough to keep the players going until they can replace it, and/or find better alternatives. This guide to healing is designed for D&D ...


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As Trish said, Use Magic Device is a trained-only skill available to Rogues mainly. From Pathfinder SRD : Since taking 20 assumes that your character will fail many times before succeeding, your character would automatically incur any penalties for failure before he or she could complete the task (hence why it is generally not allowed with skills ...


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UMD is actually a trained only skill, and a class skill to rogues. So no, you can not assume it is 'present and available'. However, if one of the group has the skill, and you let the players have or find a wand of healing or similar item, they can use it. Like you said about taking 20, I would not allow it: taking 20 means "I take so long time that it ...


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Good -vs- Evil & Law -vs- Chaos ... This is the Eternal Battle, the Great Game that the dieties of D&D are always engaged in. Humans are but pawns in this game and some will be cursed or blessed for the glory of the gods' goals. That is why there is suffering in a world filled with healing magic. Sean C's answer ends with the sentence: "In this ...


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Cure Wounds doesn't cure wounds: it restores HP From the 5.1 SRD, page 96: Hit points represent a combination of physical and mental durability, the will to live, and luck. Hit points are an abstraction: It is not the case that every lost HP represents a physical wound on the body. Make this explicit to your players, but it doesn't seem too much of a ...


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Economics Simply put, no one works for free. Doing minor miracles is certainly worth more than a secular healing as it is more effective, and instantaneous. As such y ou could easily expect to pay 10 times as much to have your broken leg cured as the doctor would charge you to splint it. Religious Intolerance You might find that some clergy will only ...


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Or, as in real life, many of the people who hang out on the street begging are actually actors who pretend to have disabilities to twinge on the conscience of the passers by. So if a cleric passes by and heals them of any infirmities, it won't change their lifestyle at all, and there'll always be beggars on the streets. (Ref: Life of Brian)


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This is indeed among the logical problems with the D&D cleric class. I find that any time you try to do serious world-building, the cleric class is the one that creates problems such as this (and you can easily draft a list of over a dozen such problems). One rather radical solution is to simply ban good clerics in your games. This is what I've done ...


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It is not directly connected with the universe of D&D, but this subject is very well explained in Trudi Canavan's Black Magician Trilogy and The Magician's Apprentice, from psychological, economical and substantial points of view. There are multiple factors. the people are distrustful of magic, as it is unnatural the people are afraid that the cleric ...


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This is a common misconception that founders on the shores of how real life works. 5e doesn't have any metrics on the distribution of leveled individuals. 3e/3.5e did (Chapter 5 of the 3.5e DMG, p.103), and there's not a lot of reason that would have changed, for the sake of argument let's use them. A 200-person hamlet would have a max leveled cleric of ...


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Gods have an agenda. They give power to their clerics to further that agenda. You need to ask "does healing a peasant's broken leg further that agenda?" If the answer is "no" then the god won't allow their cleric to cast the spell.


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True Clerics are rare The Player's Handbook points out that not all a deity's clergy are "clerics" who have magical healing powers. Not every acolyte or officiant at a temple or shrine is a cleric...True clerics are rare in most hierarchies. (Divine Agents, PH, p. 56) "Magic and strength of arms" (also PH 56) are not available to every devotee of a ...


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You need not change anything about the default setting in order to have people "left out" of the benefits of clerical magic. I don't think that clerical spellcasting is as easy to come by as you make it out to be. In other words: you can easily have your harsh and gritty world. In what follows I'll always lean toward the more-utopian interpretation of ...


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It can really be as simple as not enough time/spells. I won't be using specifics on spellslots and cost (in time and money) because this is an issue in most D&D editions, including pathfinder, and those things can change between them without changing the flavor. Though there are low level clerics or their acolytes who can use magic, they have a very ...


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You've spelled out basically all the information I was able to find on the matter, and the rules seem to work exactly as written. The only source I found with more information was Arcana Exxet, which is more detailed on how Sacrifice works: There are spells and mystical abilities that allow the caster to voluntarily sacrifice points of life to gain ...



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