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31

Vampires Were Always Hard to Hit The original release of OD&D didn't explain why. The Vampire was assigned the armor class of 2, which was the equivalent in OD&D of plate mail and shield. This may have been related to its level as a monster (7-9 HD) and thus a reflection of how tough it was even for higher level characters to do significant ...


38

Every part of a vampire that isn't its heart is effectively armor. Severing a vampire's arms & legs won't kill it. Destroying its lungs or breaking its back won't kill it. It likes having those things, true, but it can survive without them to go hole up somewhere and heal. From a perspective of "what needs to be protected, and what is protecting it", ...


0

Applying In Real Life terms to D&D: Elf would be a Species. Wood Elf would be a race. In Real Life Definitions Species: A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms where two hybrids are capable of reproducing fertile offspring, typically using sexual reproduction. Race: Race, as a social construct, is a group of people who ...


12

They're all species. The word "race" is not actually so specific as often thought, and can be used synonymously with "species" if sentient beings are involved, so it's still an appropriate word for giants, elves, and such. The ability to interbreed and produce fertile offspring is a red herring and doesn't indicate anything about species or subspecies ...


9

Why is the Solar so powerful compared to other beings from the planes? Short answer: It's a tradition, since the introduction of that creature in Dragon Magazine issue #64, 1e edition AD&D, and subsequently Monster Manual II. (A lot of stuff rolls over from edition to edition). A Solar is the most powerful of spirits, usually directly ...


14

Solars are not cognate to pit fiends Solars are angels, or aasimon, beings of generic goodness and service made and invested with power by the gods but independent of them. They have no canonical counterpart in Law, Chaos or Evil. They are so powerful because they are the highest non-proxy, non-avatar servants of the gods themselves. Planetars and devas ...


-2

This probably has more to do with the Judeo-Christian origins of the monsters concerned. Solars are arch-angels and the direct instruments of God. Demons and devils are fallen angels and lost souls and the minions of Satan. Biblical references portray arch-angels as second only to God in power and majesty. Lucifer is a fallen arch-angel so the correct ...


8

I think the origin is Munchkin actually. Munchkin has a Duck of Doom card, but per a question about it on Board & Card Games SE, linked in a comment by indigochild, there's no real source for the duck of doom joke, other than the legendary sadistic tendencies of certain gamemasters to turn any potential action into a player death. So what would would ...


73

It began with "Dungeon Crawl" during the development of the game Dungeons and Dragons. According to Gary Gygax (in an interview with Dungeon #112), the first dungeon crawl1 was part of a wargame in which the invading force entered the enemy's castle through a former escape tunnel dug from the fortress's dungeon. The group had so much fun with this ...


1

This answer make me the feel like the crusty old DM. AD&D was far more based on roleplay than dicerolling (see What are the big differences between the D&D editions? ). Because of that it was fun and easy to get a group of friends together and play with a great deal of flexability and imagination. As an example the AD&D answer to this ...


-1

For another perspective, it was a basic assumption that every PC would have 1 or more NPC henchmen. So having 6-8 characters did not assume that they would all be player characters.


7

For the most part, it’s the former: AD&D groups often had six, eight, or more people playing. When those adventures were written, tabletop gaming, and AD&D in particular, were extremely popular. You could find RPG clubs just about anywhere, and when the clubs met it was not uncommon to have ten gamers to a table. And remember, when they say 6 to 8 ...



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