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12

Gestalt is a system feature of only one edition of D&D compared to seven or eight editions(or more, depending on how you count) that don't feature it. It was invented for and arose out of the particular design philosophies of D&D 3.5e, which aren't design philosophies shared by the other editions. It was not a feature of 4e, and there's no reason to ...


11

You seem to be misquoting the DMG, which might be where the confusion is coming from. The actual quote is (bold mine, for emphasis): If your monster's AC is at least two points higher or lower than that number, adjust the challenge rating suggested by its hit points up or down by 1 for every 2 points of difference. "That number" being AC in this case. ...


5

The Flesh Golem's attack stats are calculated thusly: +7 to hit: +3 proficiency, +4 STR. You know the flesh golem's proficiency bonus is +3 because it's a CR5 monster; the table "Proficiency Bonus by Challenge Rating" (MM p.8) tells us so. 2d8+4 bludgeoning damage: +4 STR, the 2d8 is the golem's natural "weapon", its fists. That die type/number is not ...


0

I'm not going to address the mechanics of resurrection, since your question pretty much states "changing the resurrection system isn't an option". I am however going to proceed under the assumption that the physical body of the deceased comes back to life, and does not spontaneously appear out of thin air, alive and well. There are plenty of mechanical ...


1

Thanks to the further clarification that yes there's an attribute like constitution! You can borrow a mechanical method from AD&D 1e: the cost for dying and being brought back is permanent loss of a Constitution Point. That score also defines a statutory limit on the number of times being brought back from the dead can happen. Death has ...


2

There should be consequences happening in game already. How are the characters being resurrected? I find it unlikely that their corpses are just wandering over to the local temple and footing the bill. Do they have NPC allies resurrecting them? If so, then perhaps the players are too powerful to "just" be murdered, and an aspiring assailant would have to ...


5

If you haven't, read Jack of Shadows by Roger Zelazny. It takes place in a world where (some) characters return from the dead. BUT. They can do it only a limited number of times (a number each one knows for himself, but keeps a deep secret for obvious reasons), and when they rise, they rise in a special location, far from their places of power. They must ...


6

Briefly: Based on the content of the question, it sounds like resurrection takes five days. Can you make something important happen during those five days, which would be costly to the dead character or to her player by not being around to participate in it? But: Where did "changing the resurrection system isn't an option" come from? Your players? As the ...


1

Some people have the inability to let go of something they might need. The fear of failing because you don't have it available is crippling. In order for them to get over that fear, try removing the consequence for failure temporarily. I don't know much about your home campaign, but if possible, place them in a situation where they know they cannot die, no ...


5

Make sure they know the rules One reason to overconserve powers is simply being unaware of the rules. Remind the players when the powers recharge, and that there's no cost in using the powers if they can recharge them right after the battle. Necessitate it In Finland we have this saying that translates roughly to "Siberia will teach 'em". It sounds like ...


3

Increased perception in darkness (hearing, smell) seems like the best option to me. I would probably consider all your options less powerful than full darksight, although hearing and smell boosts would allow the user to gauge what's ahead in a winding cave (hearing machinery, smelling goblins and so forth). If I was a player used to running with darksight, ...



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