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6

The typical approach that I have used and played under is this: Tier-4 classes can gestalt with tier-5 classes Tier-3 classes can gestalt with tier-6 classes (i.e. non-adept NPC classes) Tier-2 and tier-1 classes cannot gestalt It’s not perfect, but it seems to work pretty well. The higher-tier classes are still more powerful, even with these benefits, ...


6

Our party barbarian wanted to choke out another NPC half-orc that she had challenged to a fight. Our DM followed the following pattern: On the strangler's turn, a regular grapple contest is made, with the strangler at disadvantage. This represents the difficulty in getting your hands/forearms/legs around the neck of the enemy. Since it's simple ...


5

For posterity's sake, the tier system discussed is this one. To summarize: tier 1 breaks the campaign every which way, tier 2 breaks the campaign in one way per character, tier 3 is always relevant, tier 4 is relevant at one thing, tier 5 isn't relevant even at their one thing, and tier 6 doesn't even get their own thing. Cutoff for Tier 1 The cutoff for ...


2

As you are fishing for house rules, I feel okay bringing in something from an earlier edition: D&D3.5 had the Choker; a monster for whom strangling opponents to death was their whole schtick. It came with a well written out mechanical ability that allowed it to do so. On more than one occassion I've succesfully applied this same ability to other ...



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