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4

Pathfinder, which aims to serve as a replacement/update of D&D 3.5, does away with XP costs and from what I have seen there is not a big difference. Downtime and cost become the standard limiter on "manufacturing" magic items. Overall, I think you will not have a huge problem if you waive the XP cost. Now, if your PCs try to flood the market, well, then ...


3

Unless Warcraft changed something, mundane crafting does not cost XP Mundane crafting requires Craft skill checks, but no Item Creation feats, and the costs are only time and money, not XP. Specifically, they cost a mere ⅓ of the base price of the item, but crafting takes a number of weeks equal to (P×10)/(DC×check) where P is the ...


8

The consequences of reducing the cost of anything is the same: it becomes more commonly available. Eliminating the cost completely is just an extreme case. If you eliminate the xp cost (which is fine, that's how the game was originally designed) then you will need to really charge time and effort if you don't want magic items to be flooding the gameworld. ...


3

Yes, you could, just you suggest or as others have suggested, but not without messing up the combat system. Combat is turn based, so each of your players still has to decide what he does and when it is your PC's turn they still have to decide (or roll) in which order they will act. When the players act they still have to roll attack and damage rolls. So ...


1

The traditional way of doing group initiative in early editions of D&D was to simply roll an (unmodified) d6 each round for each side and the high roll goes first.


5

You could do that exactly as you described, if you wanted. Maybe have the side with fewer people have everyone roll, and the side with more people only the top X roll, where X is the number on the other side. (ex 4 players vs. 7 bandits, only the four fastest bandits would roll against the players; 4 players vs. 1 boss monsters, only the fastest player ...


19

What you're describing isn't "the DM made up a rule". They didn't make up any rules at all. What you're describing is the fact the DM created some people in the world you're playing in, and decided how they worked. This is basically what the DM is there to do in D&D. Your DM decided they didn't eat human or monkey. Presumably, the DM isn't comfortable ...


0

The two fumble tables suggested by the answers are certainly better than my DM's table, but they were still a bit more severe than I had envisioned. I searched for a while and found a lot of fumble tables on the internet, but they all seemed to be rather punitive. in the end, I came up with my own. When you roll a natural 1 on your attack roll, you may ...


3

Averages and Odds The problem of fumble tables, or increased critical effects is about averages and consequences. For any given individual NPC or monster they make maybe a dozen or two dozen rolls in the time they appear in the game. Player characters, on the other hand, persist through several adventures, make way more rolls over time, and therfore ...


2

In my last campaign, I played a ranger that was obsessed with not wasting arrows. My DM and I came to an agreement that was satisfactory for both of us. You are welcome to tailor it to your needs. Any missed shot is a lost arrow. The chosen logic was, "either we are in an empty area, where the arrow could fly wide and never be found, or we are in a ...


3

In general I do not permit ammunition recovery. It's heading downrange at a great velocity. There are two basic fates: It's stopped by something or it continues until gravity brings it down. Most things capable of stopping an arrow will cause a wooden shaft to shatter, they will blunt any tip even if the shaft survives. While a blunted tip might be used ...


1

What I would do: I've not played Numenera but I usually use house rules and GM discretion based on what happens to each shot. I and my players tend to find this somewhat interesting and it helps maintain the sense of overall realism/consistency/meaningfulness-of-choices to not handwave ammunition and other supplies. Note it can also take a significant amount ...


-10

First of all, let's check what the 3.5e DMG says. It provides critical misses as an optional rule. VARIANT: CRITICAL MISSES (FUMBLES) If you want to model a chance that in combat a character could fumble his weapon, then when a player rolls a 1 on his attack roll, have him make a DC 10 Dexterity check. If he fails, his character fumbles. You need ...


4

In every campaign I have played as a player we were allowed to recover some of the arrows after a fight. No rules or reason were explained. As DM I would rule the following and adjust that according to the circumstances Some ammunition is simply lost. Bolts which missed and are burried in the ground of a grassy plain, arrows which landed in a river and ...


18

The Dungeon Master’s Guide is right to warn you about such houserules. The game was not designed for them in mind, and the game’s math reacts poorly to their introduction. In general, some of the biggest problems are that critical and fumble tables Increase swinginess, which disproportionately punishes PCs because they see many more rolls than does the ...


8

Unfortunately -- 3.5e's multiple-hit system interacts quite negatively with the notion of critical fumbles, creating a paradox where higher level characters have a higher P(fumble) than lower level characters due to the increased number of opportunities for a fumble. There are three ways out of this situation I see. The Gamist approach -- ditching fumbles, ...


18

The spell needs line of sight to work (PHB, p. 285): You unleash a string of insults laced with subtle enchantments at a creature you can see within range. But that doesn't make sense! The target could still hear your magical mockings, and that's what should matter, right? Well, no, actually. The trick here is that the spell isn't actually making ...


2

From the Vicious Mockery spell description: You unleash a string of insults laced with subtle enchantments at a creature you can see within range (PHB 285). Based on this, I would say your DM ruled correctly.


5

You need "A clear path to the target" for spells to work see p80 of the Players Basic manual: To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can’t be behind total cover. If you place an area of effect at a point that you can’t see and an obstruction, such as a wall, is between you and that point, the point of origin comes into ...


22

I strongly recommend that you urge your DM to ditch fumble and critical tables altogether. It sounds like this will be difficult to do, but you’ll find the game much improved – and, I think, so will he. This is because... Critical and fumble tables have myriad problems The Dungeon Master’s Guide even strongly recommends against them, for good reasons – and ...


7

We solved this problem by ditching the critical fumble table entirely. And the critical hit table too. The reason is that these don't add to the game. They seem to, but they really don't. If, because of the Critical Hit table, you chop through encounters 10% faster, then the GM will add 10% more monsters to regain the tension. Similarly, if the Critical ...


8

My group uses the GameMastery Critical Fumble deck. We don't use it on every natural 1, but we use it on 1's when there's something else going on (in an area that's Unhallowed, for example, or in a cursed place or wild magic place or plane of the Abyss) to add to the atmosphere of threat besides a random roll penalty. It is also available as iFumble as an ...


0

There are reasons. Whether good or not is debatable. It might help to think of it this way: Strength and Dexterity have an inverse relationship that is affected by size. The bigger you are, the stronger you are and the lower your maximum possible dexterity. The smaller you are, the more dexterous you are, but the lower your maximum strength. There are ...


9

While intended for Pathfinder, the Laying Waste critical generator and the (non-free) app version are fully d20 OGL compatible, meaning they work perfectly in 3.5. The point of Laying Waste is to make skill matter and prevent completely randomness from being the sole deciding factor in a character's fate. All the base rules changes are available on the ...


2

The first thing when trying to do gestalt for 5th ed would be to realize that the following level dependent features would NOT change, regardless so what classes you gestalt into: Proficiency bonus Spell slots per day Attribute bonus (or feat) every 4 levels Also, several features can not be combined via multiclassing, thus can't be combined via gestalt: ...


48

Honestly the best option here is to talk to your DM. Since it sounds like the rest of your party agrees with you on the matter of the fumble tables, it might help if you had at least one other player to back you up, although probably no more than that to avoid making the DM feel overwhelmed and defensive. Explain that you as players don't find the fumble ...


10

If your DM is allowing you to fumble on a natural roll of 1 but still forcing you to confirm critical threats, then he is doing it wrong. Typically, if critical hits require two rolls (one to threaten, and another to confirm) then so do critical misses or fumbles. In fact, the 3.5 DMG itself suggests a DC10 Dexterity check to confirm a fumble triggered by a ...



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