New answers tagged

3

Use Disadvantage and Skill Checks There's no need to house-rule this. DnD 5e is already set up to deal with these types of circumstances. The DMG suggests that you impose disadvantage when you feel it is appropriate and to make skill checks when there's a chance for failure. So, just like a player would need a skill check to do a backflip mid-combat, you ...


4

D&D is not a combat simulator All games make compromises between playability and simulation. Chess, for example, falls on the side of playability while the simulators the Air Force uses to train their pilots fall on the side of simulation. As war games go, D&D is simulation light, playability heavy - tending more towards Chess than an F-16 ...


1

Can I add links to various SRDs in the document? Yes, you almost certainly can. The D20 PFSRD does it all the time. If you add a copyright notice according to section 6 of the OGL, there shouldn't be anything objectionable. Quoting or not quoting text from other OGL content Again, according to section 6, you need to add a copyright notice. Then you should ...


1

Technically, this is not (directly) hurting your campaign. It is the DM's job to adjust encounters up or down based on how powerful the party is. You say that you haven't encountered anything that's an actual threat to you, but the DM could fix that by adding an extra monster to each encounter, or by giving you encounters at a higher level than where you ...


16

Arguments for why this is a bad idea. Niche Protection That's supposed to be the rangers "thing." It also kinda takes away from the avenger, which gets to roll 2 d20 and take the highest, basically making it more likely to hit and more likely to crit. It seems that a basic attack becomes better than his normal at will powers, so that's not great. In ...


6

I run D&D 5E combats describing distance in multiples of 30 feet, calling these "moves". Most spell/weapon ranges are in multiples of 30 feet. I made throwing weapons (normally a range of 20/60) have a range of 30/60 for simplicity. Since 5E doesn't have concepts like "5 foot step", the approximation is OK. "The archers are two moves away." - means PCs ...


1

I offer to you this house rule, which I have tested over nearly a decade of World of Darkness play and found to be useful and effective. It derives from the extant rules for Specialties. A character with four dots in an Attribute or Skill may, when a Specialty is relevant and would cause 10s to reroll or be doubled, remove one die from his or her pool and ...


1

For New World of Darkness/Chronicles of Darkness, the difficulty is always 8 (unlike (Old) World of Darkness, it doesn't change). Based on probability, three dice = one success, as well as one Willpower = one success (since spending Willpower grants three dice). The book World of Darkness: Mirrors details this as a hack/house rule. With Storyteller ...


0

While there are certainly more robust answers on this page already, a friend told me that a simple Expected Value equation can illustrate the difference at a more "base level". This doesn't include any of the additional on hit effects (such as sneak attack, +x damage, etc.) that will certainly exacerbate the problem. It also doesn't incorporate AC which ...


0

Conclusion For a fighter with critical hits on 19-20, attacking with Advantage gives a 40% increase in damage for AC 13 foes, 64% for AC 18 foes, 86% for AC 23 foes. Attacking with the +2 bonus the GM is using in place of Advantage, these numbers are 14%, 22% and 48% respectively. In other words, a +2 Attack Bonus is one third to one half as effective as ...


-2

I realized, as I was going online to relearn probability to the point where I could be useful to you, that I wasn't sure if your DM does things the 3.5 way and only lets you crit if you roll a 19 or 20 naturally. If so, then your crit rate (success AND failure) remains unchanged, no matter the stats, and all you get is bonus to-hit. Average roll on a d8 is ...


9

Assumptions I'm going to be making the following assumptions, based on what you've already provided: 3rd level (since you get a crit on a 19 or 20) 16 Strength (no ASI to bump up to 18) Fighting a CR 3 creature (for base math) Average damage is 7.50 (4.50 from the die +3 Str mod) Average crit damage is 12.00 (4.50 per die +3 Str mod) Attack bonus is +5 ...


3

Warning Before I get to an answer, some advice. You can achieve this effect narratively. When I had ghosts use their visage I simply made sure everyone reacted to the old man like he was an old man. He was seen as the weak link and attacked first or ignored by enemies. NPC's treated him as senile and would generally set him to the side. It is a very ...


8

Both of these are core, player-facing rules: Spend temporary Willpower for one automatic success before a roll. Automatic Success when the dice pool size is greater than or equal to the difficulty and when the story isn't hinging on the outcome. This counts as a single success and isn't usually applicable for combat. You could conceivably choose a static ...


14

Ah yes, the effects of age, I could tell you a lot about that. But I'll try to keep focused on in-game effects. I'll regret this later Penalties to abilities that simply make the character weaker (like those found in older versions) are frustrating for a player, and they are bland, and don't really evoke the feel of old age. These rules simply never ...


-5

A DM shouldn't care that the wizard can hit a mouse with a fireball pea at 400'. The spell description states that the wizard can hit a point he chooses, so he can. This is a non issue. The true issue is how the wizard determines the point. The player has a gods view of the combat and is measuring out the distance between every square and his allies to ...


-3

As a fan of 5e's simplicity, I would suggest going for a very simple solution that uses existing rules. For example, the advantage/disadvantage mechanic seems like it might be appropriate. It seems slightly harsh, especially to fighters and other strength-based classes, but one solution is to simply impose disadvantage on all Strength-related checks, and ...


-3

It seems to me that you have a point in that more experienced characters will fare better than less experienced characters in old age. However, in my opinion this is very well reflected in the fact that you get new powers (or attributes or proficiency bonus) in each and every level. You don't get to be considered experient unless you have experience. ...


8

Some previous versions of the game had rules for aging, so there is always the option of attempting to use those or convert them over. I have use some aging rules in my own campaign and here is typically how I house rule them and it works fairly well (play-tested across 4 campaigns, roughly 10-15 4 hour sessions each). Please note: All of my examples are ...


3

The house rule only improves two cantrips and not by much. The example you provided where a character could cast a spell like magic missile with their action and shillelagh with their bonus action is indeed a benefit to the player, but hardly overpowered or gamebreaking. Since you only get one bonus action per turn, it can take multiple turns to use the ...


0

To fully answer this question, you would likely have to look at the combinations of spells that can be used (I do not believe it is very many). I can think of two immediate issues that could result from this. However... There are ways to cast spells as a bonus action. Quickened Spell for instance. This may cause some problems assuming a literal ...


8

This house rule really only changes two not particularly powerful spells and is unlikely to unbalance anything This house rule would only change anything when the character casts a bonus action cantrip spell. Searching on donjon I can only find two such spells, Shillelagh and Magic Stone. Both spells give the caster a weapon to use so without spending the ...


-1

Possible House Rule - vary the AoE Sure, on paper it says a 20 foot radius in your spell book notes. But depending on the quality of the bat guano, the casters inflection, humidity, the location of Mercury... the Area of Effect might be slightly different from cast to cast. So perhaps make the area of effect 20 feet... plus 1d10-5, for a range of 15-25 ...


-3

I'm running 5e on a grid with minis. The one thing that I hate is when a sorcerer or wizards casts a fireball that perfectly hits enemies in the aoe. The player counts the squares on the grid to determine exactly where the fireball can hit and he knows that the perfect way for the fireball aoe to take effect. It will hit enemies but amazingly ...


5

I agree with the concern, largely because it bothers me that combat can be treated as a place where calm, methodical calculations have any place. I mean, sure, it's part of the genre where you're optimizing things numerically all of the time (who's going to keep their +1 sword after finding a +2, just because the +1 is prettier or was given to them by their ...


1

Have the spellcaster's player drop a d6 onto the map from 20-Dexterity inches height. Where the die lands is where the fireball detonates.


3

Reporting back on our experience: Allowing this works fine I house ruled as follows: Using a Bonus Action as your regular Action You may "demote" a bonus action and do it during your regular action. You may not use the same type of bonus action twice in the same round. The rule against casting two spells in a turn (unless one is a cantrip) ...


6

Here's one option: The wizard can point to any square they like, and the fireball is centered there, just like the spell implies, but there's nothing to say they have infinite time to figure out optimal placement -- in reality people are moving, distances are hard to judge, and so on -- if they have to stare at the map and start counting squares, then the ...


7

Don't use a grid system If you are tired of pin-point accuracy, I would suggest you stop using a pin-point accurate grid system. In my experience, it's fairly easy to switch to a non-grid system while still using minis. Actually in one of my campaigns, we frequently switch between them, based on the level of sloth we're feeling. Ultimately, it's up to you ...


6

House Rule Suggestion: Firing into Melee For the last few months my group has been using a house rule for 5e we've called, "Firing into Melee". It adds two rules Two creatures are in melee if either has attempted to attack the other within the last round and neither creature has moved since then. An area effect (be it spell, attack, trap, or something ...


22

In the earliest rules, Chainmail with its Fantasy Supplement (Gygax & Perren, 1971), the fireball referenced the catapult rules for its mechanic. That includes the following optional rule (2E, p. 10): Fire Optional: Roll two different colored dice. One color is for an over-shoot and the other is for an under-shoot. To decide which number ...


4

This only addresses a small part of your issues. The part that jumped out at me was taking out an enemy who was in melee with an ally. A simple extra rule you can apply is to say that in melee characters aren't always exactly in the place the grid specifies. Give any character actively in melee with someone affected by the fireball a chance of being ...


48

Boy, so many people lining up to tell you "don't do it that way it's badwrongfun!" I'll offer a differing perspective, which is yes, absolutely, use a house rule to this effect. It has the desired effect of adding verisimilitude without "nerfing" or "ruining" anything. I shall offer up real play experience and not pure opinion to demonstrate this. I used ...


6

As a DM, it appears from this (non) problem that you are missing the point from two directions. Taking the adversarial position, you versus the players. That isn't what this game is. Your efforts are somewhat like a good teacher or a good coach: give your players challenges of increasing difficulty so that they grow. The players aren't playing against ...


7

There are basically three options here. RAW: Don't ignore the part of the spell description that indicates that the environment is affected by the spell as well. I.e. It ignites flammable objects in the area that aren’t being worn or carried. Meaning, sure the spell may not affect the player directly, but perhaps it burned the rug the ally is ...


-1

The "what to do" If I wanted to achieve the unpredictability you asked for and wanted to make casting a fireball right next to allies more dangerous, here's what I'd do. Have the wizard roll to hit the square he wants to be the center of the spell, and if he misses the relatively low AC (or just if he fumbles, which makes the fireball still somewhat ...


5

When my players try to do something tricky using a spell, sometimes I ask them to make Spellcraft checks. "You're trying to throw a fireball to hit this one guy but not the guy standing next to him. I need a Spellcraft check, and if you fail you hit them both. Does that work for you?" My players seem to take that pretty well. (This does tend to result ...


49

This meta-game accuracy is a purposeful feature of using the optional grid rules — that kind of tactical detail is the whole point of using a grid. An obvious alternative that eliminates miniatures-based player precision is to not use the optional grid rules. There's some discussion of imprecise AoE handling on DMG page 249 (in short “make a call, consult ...


10

A fireball is in D&D what artillery is on a battlefield. Just like intelligent soldiers know how to deal with artillery, intelligent monsters know how to deal with magic users. Continuing the military analogy there are basically five techniques: Dispersal, so that AoE will strike a limited number of combatants Cover, using natural or manufactured ...


13

Prepare for a long answer... This is, ultimately, a sign of a flaw in your enemy tactics, not in the player's use of Fireball. Wizards are scholars with years of study and practice under their belt. Sorcerers literally have magic in their blood, a part of their very being that they have grown up with and come to know as well as any part of their body. So ...


75

Well, I don't think I need to tell you that it's within RAW, per the spell description of Fireball [emphasis mine]: A bright streak flashes from your pointing finger to a point you choose within range then blossoms with a low roar into an explosion of flame. Each creature in a 20-foot radius must make a Dexterity saving throw. A target takes 8d6 fire ...



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