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10

After the opportunity attack, the creature resumes its action. [Emphasis mine.] It doesn't say that the target gets to complete its action, only that it gets to resume it. However, now that the target is stunned (or, as you point out, dazed, if it has already taken another action), the action it was performing is now invalid, so upon resuming the action ...


9

The "correct" answer is that your assumptions are invalid. In my experience, a defender needing to enforce her mark more than once per round suggests both an over-zealous defender and an under-protected party. However, in practical terms, if you're even asking this question it means that the "correct" answer isn't particularly useful. A defender should, ...


8

There are a few strategies to help with this, but essentially you can't keep a monster from attacking who it (the DM) wants. You can only give it stronger discouragement. The following methods should help with that. Positioning- Position yourself between the enemies and the squishier members of your party. This strategy relies on the cooperation of your ...


8

No, but not for the reason you think: creatures cannot take interrupts on their own turns. An interrupt action has been explicitly defined as something which must occur on some other creature's turn (PHB, 268) (much to the chagrin of the Juggernaut in my party who can't use her "on bloodied" interrupt when she's bloodied from ongoing damage or auras or any ...


5

The SRD description of an immediate action says you can perform an immediate action at "any time", but this has some logical limitations. The most common interpretation is that the last chance you have to declare an immediate action to interrupt another event is after the event you are responding to has been declared, but before it has been resolved. You ...


4

No. The "end of your next turn" phase is still part of your turn and for sure it is not part of another creature's turn. Immediate ActionDDI There are two kinds of immediate actions: interrupts and reactions. The following rules govern both kinds of immediate action. Trigger: Each immediate action—usually a power—defines its trigger. The one ...


4

Yes. Compare for instance the description of the "Slowed" condition: Slowed Your speed becomes 2. This speed applies to all your movement modes, but it does not apply to teleportation or to a pull, a push, or a slide. You can’t increase your speed above 2, and your speed doesn’t increase if it was lower than 2. If you’re slowed while moving, stop ...


4

Yes, movement can be reacted to on a square by square basis. From the Immediate Action definition DDI: If a creature triggers your immediate reaction while moving (by coming into range, for example), you take your action before the creature finishes moving but after it has moved at least 1 square


4

Stances! There are a few themes and multiclassing that allow you to make opportunity attacks similar to your Combat Challenge. These stances come at the cos of a Daily though. The best OA stances come from being a ranger though, so that is a 2 feat swallow. Spike Chain multiclass at lv.10 gives you threatening reach close bust 2 Daily. Conditions! ...


4

Yes. A shift is very well defined in this question: Shifting Shifting allows for combat movement with out trigger opportunity attacks, but it does not say anything about hindering immediate actions that are not OAs. By definition this means that immediate actions (out-of-turn things) still apply. As long as the reaction being triggered is not an ...


3

Play a Paladin. Their threats, both Divine Challenge and Divine Sanction, are No Action on swing, not hit. A number of other abilities, such as Shield the Virtuous, do damage for free even when unmarked. Or a Battlmind. There are a few at-wills that do free things when monsters attack that do not require marking, unfortunately most of these only apply to ...


3

Yes, a Fighter can take both an Opportunity Attack and an Immediate Interrupt on the same turn. Immediate Actions (Rules Compendium 195) Once per Round: A creature can take only one immediate action per round, either an immediate interrupt or an immediate reaction. Therefore, if a creature takes an immediate action, it can’t take another one until ...


1

Yes, if you want. Immediate Action: Much like a swift action, an immediate action consumes a very small amount of time, but represents a larger expenditure of effort and energy than a free action. Unlike a swift action, an immediate action can be performed at any time—even if it’s not your turn. Using an immediate action on your turn is the ...


1

Shifting doesn't provoke opportunity actions, with the exception of some creatures that can mark have stipulations that if you shift away from them they can still attack you (much like the fighter's mark ability). Also I've seen some newer creatures in the monster vault that have similar abilities if two or more of them are adjacent to you. But in general, ...



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