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22

What is your player trying to accomplish? Skills have trappings unique to themselves, and that's important: you can attack with Shoot but not with Athletics, barring a particular stunt or what-have-you. So before you choose your skill, determine what mechanical action the player's narrative act is best modelled by (attack, defend, create advantage, overcome)...


20

The question makes an assumption of D&D4 that isn't really valid. Unlike previous editions of D&D weapons do not deal damage .... directly. That means that the answer to your question is composed of: What kind of weapon is the coin? What power was used? What kind of weapon is the coin? By the book, the answer is an Improvised Ranged Weapon. ...


20

[Note to those who have up-voted this answer: I've posted an alternate theory, prompted by @Escoce, which I ask you to consider. Perhaps you find that compelling and wish to retract your vote here.... -nitsua60] What you call a "non-damage attack" I'd call a contest To be clear: it's not obvious to me that all non-damaging hostile actions must necessarily ...


19

The rules for improvised weapons are on p. 147 of the PHB. In many cases, an improvised weapon is similar to an actual weapon and can be treated as such. ... At the DM's option, a character proficient with a weapon can use a similar object as if it were that weapon and use his or her proficiency bonus. You have decided that it does bludgeoning damage, ...


16

The rules say an improvised ranged weapon has no proficiency bonus, inflicts 1d4 damage, has a range of 5/10, and weighs 1 lb. (PHB, weapon charts). However... It's a freaking gold piece, not a shuriken. While I wouldn't want to take one in the skull, a coin is not gonna kill anyone. It weighs 1/3 of an ounce (10 grams), not 1 lb. That's two U.S. ...


16

Treat all of the daggers, together, as one suit of improvised Spiked Armor The rules for improvised weapons are as follows: Sometimes objects not crafted to be weapons nonetheless see use in combat. Because such objects are not designed for this use, any creature that uses one in combat is considered to be nonproficient with it and takes a −4 ...


16

You can use dead enemies as much as you want - they're one of the examples given in the description of improvised weapons. An improvised weapon includes any object you can wield in one or two hands, such as broken glass, a table leg, a frying pan, a wagon wheel, or a dead goblin. It sounds like you want to use living enemies, though. These almost ...


13

Short RAW answers: no and no. A magic item's magical properties begin and end with the effects described in their writeup, plus some general properties that all magical items have; otherwise, they behave like normal objects of their type. So beyond increasing the user's Strength, the Gauntlets of Ogre Power behave like regular gauntlets. Punching someone ...


10

This is one of those situations that the rules don't really cover and as such would be left up to the decision of the DM. Personally, I'd allow it for the sheer amusement of the player(s) but it would very much depend on what exactly is being used as the improvised weapon. From the Improvised Weapons section on page 147 of the PHB: In many cases, an ...


10

While Adam's answer sounds right to me, I do know that a thrown US penny, at 2.5g and thrown correctly, can draw blood. (I've done so.) And I like slightly more detail. The 4e coin is 1/50th of a pound (presumably avoirdupois). These compare in weight to the Sacagawea Dollar coins of the US. The coins (at 8.1g) are 56 to the avoirdupois pound (453.59237g)......


10

Yes. You automatically collect any thrown weapons after the encounter. You will probably want several of them just to make sure you can use them. I play a couple of heavy melee chars and they both carry about 5 javelins and have never run out. Of interest, if you pick up a magic javelin you will only need one. Magic thrown weapons return after they are ...


8

Improvised weapons are described as: Any small melee - DDI Improvised one-handed melee weapon Cost: — gp Damage: 1d4 Weight: 1–5 lb. Improvised weapons include anything you happen to pick up, from a rock to a chair. This would apply to any implement except a Staff and anything already a weapon. Staff's can be used as ...


7

It's a coin. One point of damage on a crit.


7

You use whichever of those makes sense in the context of the narrative at your table. There is no hard and fast rule for that. However, it's important to remember the Golden Rule: Decide what you’re trying to accomplish first, then consult the rules to help you do it. Shoot is about precision and tactics. Athletics is about power and finesse. Fight is ...


7

According to the RAW in order to use a Shield 6 lbs and a dagger (light) weapon to attack in the same round, you would need the feat Dual Wielder. Two weapon fighting (pg195 PHB) stipulates that to get a second attack both weapons used must be light. In the weapon descriptions, the heaviest weapon that is classified as a light weapon weighs 3 lbs The Dual ...


6

If the creature were willing, you might be able to use him as an improvised two handed weapon (there is no weight max on two handed improvised weapons, if you can lift it, you can hit with it). Presumably a character attempting this would have enough strength to do so. Even so, no matter what, this should require an athletics check to life the creature into ...


6

The Short Answer Yes, it's possible to carry Sandstorm's moondust in a flask. Yes, it's possible to use it as a thrown splash weapon. No, it won't induce suffocation; it'll just make your enemies filthy. The Long Answer Sandstorm's moondust (23) is a hazard, like green slime (DMG 76) and anchor mists (Du 140). You can no more weaponize moondust than you ...


6

First of all, the portable ram's price suggests it would be a very cheap weapon. It is worth only 4 gp while most heavy martial weapons are worth at least 10 gp if not more. Also, it weighs 35 lb and should be extremely heavy and difficult to swing around in combat. Therefore, I would treat it as an improvised weapon and give it disadvantage on the attack ...


5

Without using the Complete Warrior prestige classes drunken master (27) and hulking hurler (40), the former which is designed for improvised weapon using monks and the latter which is designed to throw improvised moons, improvised weapons don't get a lot of love in the hardbacks. However, Phillips-Watts's article "The Way of the Fist: 3 Prestige Classes" in ...


5

Yes. There is no reason to assume that the quoted statement about arrows breaking pertains only to ranged attacks. If you hit someone with an arrow, it breaks. If you miss, there's a 50% chance that it breaks.


5

Yes you can, and no properties carry over at all whatsoever. It's just a club now. You're using a Keranos's Crackling Crossbow of Incineration (not an actual item) as an improvised melee weapon? It's just a club as far as stats care, with 1d6 damage and no magical effects at all. You were citing the Rules Compendium, let's reopen it to the Improvised ...


4

Represent this thematically. Make your multi-target attacks represent this sort of thing without changing the rules. Assume that the enemy is picked up and put down as part of the same attack, and put down in their original spot unless a power allows for it. This would work best for a monk. Some quick ideas for Level 1 powers: Centered Flurry of Blows: Add ...


4

If the goal is to streamline your play session, I have this alternate suggestion for you: A fighter doesn't pick up an item, then learn what size it is, and strike with it. Instead, they know that this skill that is appropriate to use right now needs an item of XXX size, so they look around for one and pick it up. So instead of "I pick up a chair. Is ...


4

Handle non-damaging attacks as a weapon. First, credit where it's due: in some chatting with @Escoce I came 'round to this being a reasonable position worth considering in contrast to the my other answer to use a contest. I encourage you to compare the two and use whichever satisfies. Take a look at the Weapons table on p.149, all the way down at the ...


4

Sure, but it's weird. Eidolons have base forms - their base set of stats and starting evolutions. You can't, without fiat or class options I am unaware of, trade out those evolutions. So you can totally have a sword-shaped eidolon, but it's Medium size (aka the size of a person) and has arms and legs and fangs and stuff. Note that it doesn't need to ...


3

If the goal is to "toss a heavy object to hurt an opponent", that seems like a pretty clear application of the Shoot skill to me. It governs all the ranged weapons. I wouldn't really use Athletics for it, at any rate. If you want to emphasise "these things are heavy" then it would be better to use Physique, as that represents muscle and general toughness. (...


3

Regarding the issue of whether such an attack could trigger sneak-attack damage, I would have to say no. Here's what the SRD has to say about sneak attacks, emphases mine: The rogue must be able to see the target well enough to pick out a vital spot and must be able to reach such a spot. A rogue cannot sneak attack while striking a creature with ...


3

I have a rogue/bard in one of my games (DND 3.5) that tries this on a fair number of occasions with random objects like coins, stones, mugs, etc. It is part of his character and was for a prestige class which is why I allowed it. My ruling was: To hit: BAB + Str/Dex (whichever is higher), Damage: 1d3 + Str (for anything fine[coin], diminutive[mug], tiny[...


3

All characters have access to a "Ranged Basic Attack" Which does [1W]+Dex. A thrown coin, without other modifications, uses the character's Dex mod + half level to hit, and does 1d4+dex damage as it counts as a light thrown weapon. The coin has no weapon keywords (again, excepting the belt of the brawler) but can count as a improvised ranged or improvised ...



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