Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

The question makes an assumption of D&D4 that isn't really valid. Unlike previous editions of D&D weapons do not deal damage .... directly. That means that the answer to your question is composed of: What kind of weapon is the coin? What power was used? What kind of weapon is the coin? By the book, the answer is an Improvised Ranged Weapon. ...


15

The rules say an improvised ranged weapon has no proficiency bonus, inflicts 1d4 damage, has a range of 5/10, and weighs 1 lb. (PHB, weapon charts). However... It's a freaking gold piece, not a shuriken. While I wouldn't want to take one in the skull, a coin is not gonna kill anyone. It weighs 1/3 of an ounce (10 grams), not 1 lb. That's two U.S. ...


10

Yes. You automatically collect any thrown weapons after the encounter. You will probably want several of them just to make sure you can use them. I play a couple of heavy melee chars and they both carry about 5 javelins and have never run out. Of interest, if you pick up a magic javelin you will only need one. Magic thrown weapons return after they are ...


8

Improvised weapons are described as: Any small melee - DDI Improvised one-handed melee weapon Cost: — gp Damage: 1d4 Weight: 1–5 lb. Improvised weapons include anything you happen to pick up, from a rock to a chair. This would apply to any implement except a Staff and anything already a weapon. Staff's can be used as ...


8

While Adam's answer sounds right to me, I do know that a thrown US penny, at 2.5g and thrown correctly, can draw blood. (I've done so.) And I like slightly more detail. The 4e coin is 1/50th of a pound (presumably avoirdupois). These compare in weight to the Sacagawea Dollar coins of the US. The coins (at 8.1g) are 56 to the avoirdupois pound ...


5

The Short Answer Yes, it's possible to carry Sandstorm's moondust in a flask. Yes, it's possible to use it as a thrown splash weapon. No, it won't induce suffocation; it'll just make your enemies filthy. The Long Answer Sandstorm's moondust (23) is a hazard, like green slime (DMG 76) and anchor mists (Du 140). You can no more weaponize moondust than you ...


3

I have a rogue/bard in one of my games (DND 3.5) that tries this on a fair number of occasions with random objects like coins, stones, mugs, etc. It is part of his character and was for a prestige class which is why I allowed it. My ruling was: To hit: BAB + Str/Dex (whichever is higher), Damage: 1d3 + Str (for anything fine[coin], diminutive[mug], ...


3

All characters have access to a "Ranged Basic Attack" Which does [1W]+Dex. A thrown coin, without other modifications, uses the character's Dex mod + half level to hit, and does 1d4+dex damage as it counts as a light thrown weapon. The coin has no weapon keywords (again, excepting the belt of the brawler) but can count as a improvised ranged or improvised ...


2

(Assuming Pathfinder) By the rules, this is totally simple. It's a ranged attack, with the usual -4 penalty for throwing an improvised weapon (unless they have Throw Anything). However, you are correct in feeling that maybe it would make sense in the game world for the barrel to do more damage than a normal ranged attack. This goes past "rules" to "GM ...


1

Whatever method you use to attain this item is up to your DM, as is the result when you take the stopper of the flask/break said container. For my game I bent the world a bit and turned the wizard Mordenkainen, from Greyhawk, into a traveling merchant aswel as a mighty wizard. If anything I would try to treat it as a thrown item resulting in a local ...


1

Yes, you can pick up a thrown weapon within the encounter. The DM needs to decide how to determine its location. I don't believe there are existing rules for this, but it's pretty simple to make one up. If the attack was a hit, either the weapon is lodged in the target or not -- probably not. If it was a miss, or the weapon struck and fell, roll 1d8 to ...


1

Alternatively, you could (depending on how much verisimilitude you want in your game) invoke the Rule of Cool, and say that they're trained in coin-throwing. Unless it's just an improvised weapon. But honestly, a guy who's trained to learn how to throw coins lethally...that's pretty awesome in my book.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible