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21

What is your player trying to accomplish? Skills have trappings unique to themselves, and that's important: you can attack with Shoot but not with Athletics, barring a particular stunt or what-have-you. So before you choose your skill, determine what mechanical action the player's narrative act is best modelled by (attack, defend, create advantage, ...


20

The question makes an assumption of D&D4 that isn't really valid. Unlike previous editions of D&D weapons do not deal damage .... directly. That means that the answer to your question is composed of: What kind of weapon is the coin? What power was used? What kind of weapon is the coin? By the book, the answer is an Improvised Ranged Weapon. ...


16

Treat all of the daggers, together, as one suit of improvised Spiked Armor The rules for improvised weapons are as follows: Sometimes objects not crafted to be weapons nonetheless see use in combat. Because such objects are not designed for this use, any creature that uses one in combat is considered to be nonproficient with it and takes a −4 ...


16

The rules say an improvised ranged weapon has no proficiency bonus, inflicts 1d4 damage, has a range of 5/10, and weighs 1 lb. (PHB, weapon charts). However... It's a freaking gold piece, not a shuriken. While I wouldn't want to take one in the skull, a coin is not gonna kill anyone. It weighs 1/3 of an ounce (10 grams), not 1 lb. That's two U.S. ...


10

Yes. You automatically collect any thrown weapons after the encounter. You will probably want several of them just to make sure you can use them. I play a couple of heavy melee chars and they both carry about 5 javelins and have never run out. Of interest, if you pick up a magic javelin you will only need one. Magic thrown weapons return after they are ...


9

While Adam's answer sounds right to me, I do know that a thrown US penny, at 2.5g and thrown correctly, can draw blood. (I've done so.) And I like slightly more detail. The 4e coin is 1/50th of a pound (presumably avoirdupois). These compare in weight to the Sacagawea Dollar coins of the US. The coins (at 8.1g) are 56 to the avoirdupois pound ...


9

Would the Improvised Weapon Proficiency be what you are looking for? Or would something broader like Always Armed by Jonathan Drain be more your flavor?


8

Improvised weapons are described as: Any small melee - DDI Improvised one-handed melee weapon Cost: — gp Damage: 1d4 Weight: 1–5 lb. Improvised weapons include anything you happen to pick up, from a rock to a chair. This would apply to any implement except a Staff and anything already a weapon. Staff's can be used as ...


7

It's a coin. One point of damage on a crit.


7

You use whichever of those makes sense in the context of the narrative at your table. There is no hard and fast rule for that. However, it's important to remember the Golden Rule: Decide what you’re trying to accomplish first, then consult the rules to help you do it. Shoot is about precision and tactics. Athletics is about power and finesse. Fight is ...


6

If the creature were willing, you might be able to use him as an improvised two handed weapon (there is no weight max on two handed improvised weapons, if you can lift it, you can hit with it). Presumably a character attempting this would have enough strength to do so. Even so, no matter what, this should require an athletics check to life the creature into ...


6

The Short Answer Yes, it's possible to carry Sandstorm's moondust in a flask. Yes, it's possible to use it as a thrown splash weapon. No, it won't induce suffocation; it'll just make your enemies filthy. The Long Answer Sandstorm's moondust (23) is a hazard, like green slime (DMG 76) and anchor mists (Du 140). You can no more weaponize moondust than you ...


5

Without using the Complete Warrior prestige classes drunken master (27) and hulking hurler (40), the former which is designed for improvised weapon using monks and the latter which is designed to throw improvised moons, improvised weapons don't get a lot of love in the hardbacks. However, Phillips-Watts's article "The Way of the Fist: 3 Prestige Classes" in ...


5

Yes. There is no reason to assume that the quoted statement about arrows breaking pertains only to ranged attacks. If you hit someone with an arrow, it breaks. If you miss, there's a 50% chance that it breaks.


4

Represent this thematically. Make your multi-target attacks represent this sort of thing without changing the rules. Assume that the enemy is picked up and put down as part of the same attack, and put down in their original spot unless a power allows for it. This would work best for a monk. Some quick ideas for Level 1 powers: Centered Flurry of Blows: Add ...


4

If the goal is to streamline your play session, I have this alternate suggestion for you: A fighter doesn't pick up an item, then learn what size it is, and strike with it. Instead, they know that this skill that is appropriate to use right now needs an item of XXX size, so they look around for one and pick it up. So instead of "I pick up a chair. Is ...


3

If the goal is to "toss a heavy object to hurt an opponent", that seems like a pretty clear application of the Shoot skill to me. It governs all the ranged weapons. I wouldn't really use Athletics for it, at any rate. If you want to emphasise "these things are heavy" then it would be better to use Physique, as that represents muscle and general toughness. ...


3

Regarding the issue of whether such an attack could trigger sneak-attack damage, I would have to say no. Here's what the SRD has to say about sneak attacks, emphases mine: The rogue must be able to see the target well enough to pick out a vital spot and must be able to reach such a spot. A rogue cannot sneak attack while striking a creature with ...


3

I have a rogue/bard in one of my games (DND 3.5) that tries this on a fair number of occasions with random objects like coins, stones, mugs, etc. It is part of his character and was for a prestige class which is why I allowed it. My ruling was: To hit: BAB + Str/Dex (whichever is higher), Damage: 1d3 + Str (for anything fine[coin], diminutive[mug], ...


3

All characters have access to a "Ranged Basic Attack" Which does [1W]+Dex. A thrown coin, without other modifications, uses the character's Dex mod + half level to hit, and does 1d4+dex damage as it counts as a light thrown weapon. The coin has no weapon keywords (again, excepting the belt of the brawler) but can count as a improvised ranged or improvised ...


2

(Assuming Pathfinder) By the rules, this is totally simple. It's a ranged attack, with the usual -4 penalty for throwing an improvised weapon (unless they have Throw Anything). However, you are correct in feeling that maybe it would make sense in the game world for the barrel to do more damage than a normal ranged attack. This goes past "rules" to "GM ...


2

What should happen in this situation? What should happen RAW is that you get as many attacks as you wield daggers - that is, 1 attack if you wield 1 dagger in 1 hand or 2 attacks if you wield a dagger in each hand and full-attack. The rest don't count, since they're not being wielded in your hands. I'd probably let it count for Spiked Armor though.


2

The case is not covered in RAW. There is a feat in the Races of Stone (I don't remember what it's called) that has rules on throwing someone. Without that as a guide I would say a mix of RAW and experienced-backed house rule is the best option. Here is mine: Make sure the PC is strong enough to pick up the creature in question. If they can't lift/press ...


2

Weapon and Torch does not have you using the torch as a weapon Notably, you do not make a separate attack roll with the torch: you make an attack roll with whatever weapon you are using, and then if that hits, you also use the torch for some extra damage. The use of the torch in this manner is automatic following a hit with the weapon. You can use a torch ...


1

When in doubt, create a table If you're having issues determining the damage of items that may or may not be in the area, grab a list of furnishings that you might fill an inn with and divide those objects up by size rating ( small, medium, large, huge ). Once you have this table created, divide the objects up and assign them damage values, then assign ...


1

Anatomically No, almost certainly not. In almost all cases involving two creatures of nominally equal size, trying to do this would simply overbalance the assailant. Mechanically By the RAW, not the way you described I shouldn't think. Mostly for the same reason that you can use a bar stool as improvised weapon, but not the bar. It's just too big to make ...


1

Whatever method you use to attain this item is up to your DM, as is the result when you take the stopper of the flask/break said container. For my game I bent the world a bit and turned the wizard Mordenkainen, from Greyhawk, into a traveling merchant aswel as a mighty wizard. If anything I would try to treat it as a thrown item resulting in a local ...


1

The barrel would be an improvised weapon. Let's assume it's two-handed, so that's 1d8 damage (PH1 219). It would be melee or ranged depending on whether it's being tossed. At the DM's discretion, I could see ignoring the resistance to normal melee or ranged attacks, since it's a barrel.


1

Yes, you can pick up a thrown weapon within the encounter. The DM needs to decide how to determine its location. I don't believe there are existing rules for this, but it's pretty simple to make one up. If the attack was a hit, either the weapon is lodged in the target or not -- probably not. If it was a miss, or the weapon struck and fell, roll 1d8 to ...


1

Alternatively, you could (depending on how much verisimilitude you want in your game) invoke the Rule of Cool, and say that they're trained in coin-throwing. Unless it's just an improvised weapon. But honestly, a guy who's trained to learn how to throw coins lethally...that's pretty awesome in my book.



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