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25

Legal issues First, I'm not a lawyer. I've spent the past 15 years paying attention to the shifting landscape of copyright and trademark and other IP law, so I can point you toward a few ideas that might help, but I'm still not a lawyer and can't give you legal advice that's worth a damn when you actually start publishing. Infringing others' IP rights ...


22

Sounds like "Everway," which came out in the mid-1990s from Wizards of the Coast.


16

The answer really depends on what you like, but here's the top three I'd recommend, and why: Primetime Adventures: The rules are simple and the game does a good job of stealing the format of the serial TV show. You can play in any setting. Possible upside or downside: it's designed for long-term play, 5 or more sessions. The Shab-Al-Hiri Roach: Again, the ...


16

I would argue that "mechanical character advancement" isn't necessary, but advancement as a whole is. Non-mechanical Character Advancement could fille this purpose. This could be accomplished not with dice and stats, but with abilities granted as plot points, character development by the player and the GM (GM's acknowledging character development is very ...


14

According to this: I'm pretty sure that I understand what an Ash-Can is: It's a text that comes implicitly (and maybe explicitly) packaged with a disclaimer ... "contents are sold as-is, no guarantee of quality is implied, nor should any be inferred." And According to wikipedia: An ashcan copy is a term that originated in the Golden Age of Comic ...


13

Echoing some earlier answers (which I upvoted), I'd suggest: Universalis (really open ended, and will teach you mechanics and social interaction) Sorcerer (blow your mind) Dogs in the Vineyard (blow your mind again as you watch people make tough decision in a easy system) Burning Wheel (crunchy tolkien goodness) PTA / Primetime adventures (Play any TV show ...


12

(This is all based on reading about ashcans on a variety of indie RPG sites a year or two ago. I have purchased a few.) The word "ashcan" comes from the comic book industry. In recent usage in the comic book industry it tends to mean a smaller format comic (for varying meanings of "smaller") used as a freebie to try and hook new readers. In the indie RPG ...


12

It is a pretty solid system. It's a bit on the rules-heavy side, but it has no real fundamental flaws, and the minor flaws are being ironed out. It may say that it's not real at the end, but as far as I know that's for legal reasons, as there is a complete (and entirely real) set of rules and fluff. It is best for heroic games and games that are at least a ...


11

Barring further detail on the question, I'm gonna recommend My Life With Master. It's an early indie game, but it holds up fairly well, and it really does a great job of introducing the idea of story-oriented mechanics. Not all indie games are story-oriented, but lots of 'em are. It also keeps the GM role front and center, which makes it easier for people ...


11

I would recommend getting InSpectres. It is a very simple game to get into, and easy to explain, yet each session of it is amazingly fun!


10

I found a German-language timeline of the setting's metaplot. It's far too long to recount here, but the part of the timeline that describes events since the beginning of the game is fairly short. Since I don't know anything about the setting I'm afraid I can't summarize even that part for you. However, a Google translation should give you a pretty good ...


10

As well as facilities I'd say safety and insurance are, going to be your primary concern. Make sure that wherever you hold this you have at the very least a first aider there for any sort of injury that may occur and the means to get someone to hospital if necessary; one larp I was in a friend fell and shattered their shoulder while just running down a hill, ...


10

If you're developing your own RPG and you and your friends enjoy it, that's great! If you want to play a particular way, and creating your own thing to let you play that way is what makes you happy, then there's nothing you need to worry about. There's nothing wrong with developing another, whether it's for yourself or others - that isn't a bad thing at all, ...


9

Support is one of the major advantages. In general, indie and small-press publishers have a much stronger and more personal web and con presence. You can expect answers to email and forum posts from the small publisher. While it isn't universally true, you can kind of expect a personal game to be less a product and more a passion. It is more likely to ...


9

I got to play Do: PotFT twice with Daniel Solis at GenCon. Under his expert direction, we always assured that someone besides the current player was writing in the journal. Usually, the person who's turn just ended, so there would be plenty of time for them to finish before it became their turn again. The journal never became a distraction.


8

If you've already had experience with FUDGE, I would try FATE. It's a free generic ruleset, or you can check out games like Diaspora (science fiction), Dresden Files (urban fantasy), or Spirit of the Century (pulp), Starblazer Adventures (space opera), and Legends of Anglerre (fantasy), all of which are based on the FATE engine. The Aspects fate uses are ...


8

Shock: Social Science Fiction - Shared world creation, shared GMing responsibilities, very aggressive scene framing, situations where what the player and his character want are different, mechanics structured around theme instead of physics, mechanics customized to your particular game session. Is quite good at generating the sorts of science fiction short ...


8

No. ZERO was a strange experimental game from Archangel Entertainment that came out in 1997. Interface Zero is a contemporary cyberpunk RPG with both Savage Worlds and Modern20 implementations. Two separate games.


8

I was a playtester for the game, so I can attest that it is in fact playable. There has been a HUGE demand for a more polished version along with more material. The creator has started a blog to help people keep track of the progress of things, as well as an IRC chat: Server: irc.rizon.net Channel: #dtdchat


7

A selection that I'd recommend: Don't Rest Your Head You're an exhausted insomniac and you're slowly going mad. Oh and something's going to eat you if you ever go to sleep. 3:16 - Carnage Amongst The Stars You're a Space Marine charged with protecting the human race from all possible threats: the best way to do that is to visit every planet in the universe ...


7

Increasing the player base The first question is not just how but when to increase the player base. If you expand ahead of your readiness, you'll lose people just as quickly. If this is the first event you've ever hosted, a demo dry-run with 'just close friends' to test the system and preparations isn't a bad idea. If it's possible, get feedback ...


7

Sounds to me like the Bunk system from Changeling: The Dreaming. The difficulties for casting spells (called cantrips) are fairly high, but they're lowered by the performance of fairly bizarre or outlandish tricks. (Reciting the alphabet backwards; smoking an entire pack of cigarettes at one time; leading the group in a sing-along; so on.)


7

Vincent Baker's blog "Anyway" has a ton of valuable information, including both theory and sales/publishing information. In any given post, there's a lot of smart discussion as well. A good theory/idea listing is right here. Vincent is a GREAT resource and you should ask questions! (I think he also has a good following on Google Plus, so there may be ...


6

Mouse Guard is a good introduction to the Burning Wheel / Burning Empire family. In my experience, it offers enough crunchy bits to ease the transition from D&D but also offers plot devices like Beliefs, Instincts, Goals and Traits. Character generation is also based on a list of questions, leading players to think more about their character as opposed ...


6

A game using the FATE system is often a good game to dip your toes into the narrative control/player empowerment waters before getting into the really non-mainstream games.


6

Right now there are some truly awesome new indie games in the pile you might want to try: Annalise: A fantastic light-mechanics indie game which focuses on the conflict between some very flawed protagonists and a "vampire." Framed in an almost traditional vampire-Gothic setup, it can easily go well beyond that. The meat of the mechanics are about calling ...


5

I believe that the biggest disadvantage here can be finding players to play. You can't just say "looking for players of _", because nobody's heard of __. Being online might be the only way to find players for these RPGs, though some indie games are also harder to play online than in-person. Provided you can find players to play, you need players who will go ...


5

I recommend Risus, the "anything RPG". It's completely free, and there's a ton of material that people have made for it available. Check out the Ring of Thieves solo adventure, which gives you a good feel for the possibilities of the game. Another good free one to check out is Lady Blackbird, which is a steampunk game, setting, and adventure all in one. I ...


5

Creative Commons is a nice license to use. For example, Eclipse Phase is using it and has sold a lot of physical copies -- there was a note on their web site but I cannot find it now. This allows you to distribute your book(s) for free with a tip jar. This is an easy way to get noticed but not all publication houses will agree to print the book under that ...


5

there is a white-wolf game set in the original world of darkness called Mage: The Ascension where the players are mages, some of the factions have strange addictions to magic, and there is even a mechanic for the drawbacks that magic can have on players who use it too much. Paradox from the site: Paradox is accrued when a Mage uses vulgar magic that ...



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