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28

These types of questions are pretty common. The rules are often unclear, IMO not necessarily because of inadequacies of the developers/writers, but because (as we see from the variety of answers/discussions) these are tough, complex questions. I don't have a definitive answer, but I have a recommendation that I believe warrants more than a comment, so I'll ...


28

No, you can't see the creature's aura, but you can detect if there's magic within 30 feet of you, including magic items he might be carrying, though you can't determine the nature of the items. From the text of Detect Magic: For the duration, you sense the presence of magic within 30 feet of you. If you sense magic in this way, you can use your ...


27

"items picked up disappear if tucked into the clothing or pouches worn by the creature." – Invisibility, d20srd Based on the above, I'd say stuff put into the box arguably becomes invisible. A pouch is a container. A box is a container. Stuff put into an invisible container disappear. Sure, the RAW says in the quote above that the container is ...


23

Yes. PHB p. 291 description of the Invisible condition states in part: An invisible creature is impossible to see without the aid of magic or a special sense. Blindsight is such a "special sense". (Other special senses that work against invisible creatures are Tremorsense and Truesight.)


22

An invisible creature is not hidden. All creatures are fully aware of which square/location it is in, therefore it remains on the battle mat. This is one of the core Rules of Hidden Club. The First Premise: Everyone knows where everyone else is, at all times, period. The Second Premise: There is one and only one exception to The First Premise, and that ...


19

The wording for Invisibility is (PHB p.254): The spell ends for a target that attacks or casts a spell. And the Ring of Spell Storing is (DMG p.192): While wearing this ring, you can cast any spell stored in it. and ... but is otherwise treated as if you cast the spell. If you use the ring you "cast a spell". If you are under an ...


18

Yes, the target is made visible by the ink. From the Pathfinder Glossary entry on Invisibility: If an invisible character picks up a visible object, the object remains visible. An invisible creature can pick up a small visible item and hide it on his person (tucked in a pocket or behind a cloak) and render it effectively invisible. One could coat an ...


18

You're not the first to wonder about this The designers have known for a while that there are questions surrounding the scenario in which a creature affected by the spell glitterdust casts the spell invisibility. Pathfinder lead designer Jason Bulmahn clarifies (to some extent) in this 2010 thread: Glitterdust kills invisibility and all the rules that ...


17

Do you get your dexterity bonus against an invisible foe when you have uncanny dodge or not? Yes, you do. The Pathfinder SRD states: Uncanny Dodge (Ex) At 2nd level, a barbarian gains the ability to react to danger before her senses would normally allow her to do so. She cannot be caught flat-footed, nor does she lose her Dex bonus to AC ...


17

The light vanishes under invisibility. Invisibility makes everything the subject is holding invisible. Invisible means you can't see it and can't tell it's there visually. Invisible things don't cause any visible effect - they don't block, reflect, or emit any light: you can see through them, they don't cast shadows, and don't shine light. Someone ...


15

Ok, crazy thing about the difference between hidden and invisible...there isn't much of one. The big difference between the two is the ability to be attacked directly. If you are hidden, your enemy doesn't know your location, and thus cannot target you directly. They have to guess (DM should use some kind of randomization here), and may or may not actually ...


14

The box and its contents - creatures included - probably vanish from sight. The rules on this appear to be... missing. The author of the Invisibility spell description, it seems, had an oversight. At the beginning, they write: The creature or object touched becomes invisible, vanishing from sight, even from darkvision. ... and then they proceed for ...


14

Yes. And the quotation to back this up comes from the PRD glossary on invisibility where it says almost at the bottom: Invisibility does not thwart divination spells. If we look up Detect Magic it says plainly that it is of the divination school. Thus it can be used to detect the aura from magical invisibility. Indirectly confirming this is the fact ...


14

The light spell says: Completely covering the object with something opaque blocks the light. The amulet may not be visible, but it is not covered. Therefore, the light will still emit in a 20'radius around the amulet/bard. Since this is 5th ed, though, you can just ask your DM to rule whichever way satisfies your group.


14

Light, however, never becomes invisible, although a source of light can become so (thus, the effect is that of a light with no visible source) This is in the online description for 3.5e version of the spell. And I think this makes sense. I thought it was worded along this description in the 5e PHB, but light is not mentioned there.


13

No, the attacks still have the miss chance Pinpointing the location just prevents you from having to guess which square the invisible creature is in. You still have the miss chance — it says so in the Invisibility description. even if an attacker correctly guesses the invisible creature's location, the attacker has a 50% miss chance in combat. ...


12

Yes. Invisibility does not conceal any aura, it just fouls sight. You also need a way to hide auras if you want your character/item to be undetectable.


12

Yes. I never thought of that usage for them before, but I would have to say yes. If you look at other entries like the Bone Devil (Osyluth) under special abilities they are sometimes noted as "Invisibility (self only)". The Ogre Magi has no such notation, so it will work just like the spell definition I believe - both Invisibility and Gaseous Form allow ...


12

Yes, you remain invisible. The text states: When you are in an area of dim light or darkness, you can use your action to become invisible until you move or take an action or a reaction. We can break it up to determine how it works. When you are in an area of dim light or darkness, you can use your action to become invisible This is the only ...


11

Yes, it does end. The general rules for magic state: Some spell descriptions refer to attacking. All offensive combat actions, even those that don't damage opponents, are considered attacks. Aiding Another, because it either makes an opponent more vulnerable to attack or less able to attack back, is an offensive combat action. Here are the rules again, ...


11

Yes Advantage applies, since the you in the unseen attackers sections is referring to whatever creature is invisible/can't be seen. In this case it is your familiar, and it would have advantage, even though it uses your attack modifier.


10

No, Invisible Creatures Do Not Provoke Opportunity Attacks (From Enemies That Can't See Them) From page 221 of the Rules Compendium: An invisible creature can take advantage of several benefits. It can't be seen by normal forms of vision. It has total concealment against any enemy that can't see it. It has combat advantage against any enemy ...


10

Items dropped or put down by an invisible creature become visible; items picked up disappear if tucked into the clothing or pouches worn by the creature. Light, however, never becomes invisible, although a source of light can become so (thus, the effect is that of a light with no visible source). Any part of an item that the subject carries but that ...


10

The designers could've gone nuts trying to come up with specific rules on this, because it's a situation that's subject to so many potential modifiers. Personally, I'd handle the general case as a Perception check...you're trying to observe your potential targets for signs that they might know you're there. And unless those targets have some reason to ...


9

Yep, remains on the map. Here are the 4e Official rules on Invisible. Can’t be seen by normal forms of vision. Has combat advantage against any enemy that can’t see it. Doesn’t provoke opportunity attacks from enemies that can’t see it. Has Total Concealment (-5 Penalty to Attack Rolls): when can’t be seen. Invisible Creatures and Stealth: If an ...


9

Presence, yes. But the most basic use of the spell only says that something is there, not where it is, so it wouldn't spoil the invisibility effect. To actually get an idea of where the invisible person is, you'd have to concentrate for a couple of rounds. Two rounds is enough if the invisibility spell is the strongest in the area, but that's easy to ...


9

The archer gets visible after the first shot. So only the first one is a sneak attack. But for example, if you have a higher initiative result at the beginning of an encounter, your foe is flat-footed and every attack you make is a sneak attack. The same is true if you flank your foe in melee. Sometimes, you make multiple attacks with the same attack roll, ...


9

if it is illusion magic, which creates a field of distortion that covers the object with what SEEMS to be behind it (a la IRL invisibility nanocamera cloak) then yes if it is alteration magic, which physically alters the material properties of the object, rendering it transparent to visible wavelenths of light then no


9

Yes, he may cast either or both on allies Both invisibility and gaseous form have “Range: Touch” and “Target: One creature” (invisibility can also be used as “Range: Personal” and “Target: You” or “Range: Touch” and “Target: One object”), and being cast as a spell-like ability does not change any of the parameters of the spell aside from the Components ...


8

As I see it, there are two basic parts to this question: can you hold the charge on a Reach spell, and is the 'ray' made by a Reach spell visible? To the first question: You cannot hold the charge on a Reach spell. A Reach spell is a ranged touch attack, and the rules for holding the charge specifically call out touch attacks, which are different. The ...



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