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44

You shouldn't do this Your stated goal is to introduce your 9 year old to gaming. Does your 9 year old still enjoy Dora the Explorer? Would playing in a soccer game with her 4 year old sister be a real game or just a goof? Would you have them playing the same instrument together to learn it? Do they play each other on Wii/360 games without it ending up in ...


36

Children don't have the depth of view or span of attention that adults have. If your players are young, it's not a bad thing to railroad them a little bit. You might do this by simply "replacing" the information via some other means: an old beggar they show kindness to tells them he's heard a rumor about the gang, a respected character lovingly chides them ...


30

Read To Him You should be doing this anyway because reading to kids is good for them in general, but it's really handy here. Both to encourage reading, and by mixing in stories of adventure you can let him use his imagination and foster that type of development. Play Games With Him You're already doing this. Keep it up! Make believe games are great, as ...


29

I'm not familiar with D&D so this will be a system agnostic answer. What you could do is provide an in-game explanation as to why the character of the youngest daughter sometimes disappears from the game or does strange things. Give her a character with a chaotic neutral allignment and take over some of the narrative aspects of the game for her. She ...


25

I DM a 3.5 game and have a one year old. Yes, they will cause disruptions. They won't be the only things that do. Disruptions Happen The truth about "immersion" is that disruptions happen. That's the reality of tabletop gaming. They happen because the kids are running around, or they wake up, or the phone rings, or you need to pull something out of the ...


22

Engage Your Kids in Shared Storytelling Just as reading to your children is hugely important to foster a future love of reading, I think story-telling is an important activity, too. When my kids were little, I'd sometimes engage them in shared story-telling. Give them an opening theme - "One day, Prince Jacob rode out of his castle early in the morning to ...


11

In addition to the issues caused by your players being children, this is a common issue for tabletop games in general: players rarely focus on what you think is important, and rarely do what you expected them to do. If you've played with a specific group for a while, you get a sense for how they might act; joining or starting a new group with different ...


10

focus on games involving a physical object, yet using imagination The floor is lava is a great example of this (so long as you supervise and don't mind your kid getting all over your furniture). It lets you and your child utilize your everyday surroundings to create fun. Build Forts with pillows, blankets and furniture. Pillow forts (as I call them) were a ...


10

I have, I kid you not, been running a My Little Pony Campaign in the Fate system. It's got to be the most ludicrously non-violent game, of any sort, I've ever played. And it works quite well in that system because everything (including any sort of violence) comes down to a certain set of skills rather than the use of an object that your character ...


10

Use recaps. At the beginning of each scene or encounter, recap on what has happened so far in a general, unforced and impartial way so as to remind them of options that they might have forgotten about. I have issues with this kind of thing with a table full of adults, so I really am not surprised that it's something you are encountering with your children.


9

I have experience bringing kids (my own son and his friends) into RPGs. I have experience with Dungeon World. I have experience with Fate and FAE. However - I do not have experience introducing kids to RPGs with Dungeon World or FAE. Just to be explicitly clear. With that being said, as the probable instigator of this question, I feel that it is incumbent ...


9

I have played a bunch very simplified D&D dungeon crawl games with my 4.5 year old, using the D&D boardgames (http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/59946/dungeons-dragons-castle-ravenloft-board-game and such) for most of the content. The included rules are almost like the 'big editions' of D&D but includes a number of simplifications already - such ...


8

I will expand on this tommorow, but three things from my personal experience. Obviously it will depend on the individual children. Feel free to invite the 7 year old to play. If your child is mature enough, and depending on the relationship between the children, it's possible to have a 7 year old play a character, as well as have the younger children be ...


8

Create stories and adventures with toys, plush and otherwise. Give them persistent personalities. Get the child to participate in these fantasy adventures. Stuff like: Teddy bear goes on adventure to find the cookies. How does teddy get down? How does teddy avoid the cat/dog (ie wandering guard)? how does teddy get up to the cookies? etc.


7

After a quick chat with @Joshua Aslan Smith, I feel good about Dungeon World due to the lesser use of mechanical terms when playing. This is what he said that convinced me: So as one of the commentators said basically the majority of Dungeon worlds rules are on the GM side I should find some play examples (also if you watch that video someone linked ...


7

Another solution is play tabletop RPGs online with your friends in the evening, after your children's bedtime. This avoids problems with finding babysitters, interruptions while playing, and of course the huge disruption to your kid's bedtime routine if there are a bunch of people in your house talking & laughing. I'm a father of a 4 year old and have ...


6

I agree with mxyzplk, in that I think the 4 year old shouldn't really play the game, or you'll weaken the 9 year old's enjoyment of it; but I do think you can involve her without doing too much damage to the 9 year old's enjoyment. I haven't done this with D&D, but with other games with my nephews (7 and 4 at the time) what we'd do is play with the 7 ...


6

I speak from experience when I tell you that starting them at a young age can be done. I began playing D&D (2e) with my two sons at ages 8 and 3 respectively. We have gamed together for over 10 years now, and both my sons have gone on to play and gamemaster with their friends (2e, 4e). We are all now learning 5e. First of all, I can not overstate the ...


5

I successfully raised two kids now 19 & 17 who have both become avid RPG gamers themselves. I think some of the points brought up here are exactly right. I read to them all the time, and they grew up watching my friends and I RPGing. But I also took an interest in their own pretend games they made up themselves. I slowly introduced them to setting up ...


5

It just seems to me that one would always cover their bases before moving forward in a campaign If this is something that people do in other forms of fiction that you share with your kids then sure, if they aren't doing it they've probably forgotten the mercs or overlooked their significance. "And then the Prince and Princess checked the likely ...


5

The most child friendly RPG I can think of is the Adventure Time RPG based on 4th edition D&D. It's got great art, really straight forward and all the characters, races and classes are based on Adventure Time. You can download it freely from the author here The kids I played it with were from 10 - 13. 2 of them fans of Adventure Time, the others had ...


4

For a while I've been running a tabletop RPG for a 14-year-old boy with Autism who uses it as an emotion regulator. The game obviously has to be a little different since he needs a unique experience. Here are a few things that you might be able to apply. When the enemies are too scary or strong, just run. Focus on remaining unseen, solving puzzles, talking ...


4

Systems As one part of this, I would take a look at the wide variety of RPGs now available that are aimed directly at younger players. In order of ascending complexity, I would first look at the following games: Do: Pilgrims of the Flying Temple: I had an absolute blast playing this game with the designer a few GenCons ago - so you and your wife won't get ...


3

We have run several campaigns in the Mouse Guard RPG, which is based on the burning wheel rules. Though I believe it is hard to find a book for the RPG now, if you are lucky to find one in a local book shop or used I highly recommend it. It does have rules for conflicts and resolutions to those conflicts with violence, however, they are not needed at all to ...


3

I've played games where violence is an option, but rarely occurs. The players and NPCs are usually reasonable enough to settle their differences through diplomacy. My fellow players and I are adults, but there's no reason why this couldn't work for kids. From my (not so recent) experience, some systems (like D&D) are combat heavy and relatively light ...


2

The Champions Complete book might be just what you're looking for. According to the product description At 240 pages, Champions Complete includes everything superhero gamers need, and nothing they don't. New players will love the unmatched freedom of Champions that allows them to create and play exactly the hero they imagine. Longtime fans will ...


2

May I also suggest the Hero System Sidekick book. Here is what the store says about it: Sidekick contains all of the core HERO System rules, including character creation, combat and adventuring, and equipment ? but without all of the additions, options, and details found in the standard rulebook. Sidekick boils the HERO System down to its essential ...


2

Depending upon one's own tastes, I can recommend three different game engines I've used with children. Tunnels and Trolls - any edition. If the kids can handle rolling and adding piles of dice (a typical starting character is rolling between 3 and 10 dice for attacking). Requires additions well into the double digits, but otherwise, it's simple, and ...


2

Your mention of Freeport leads me to think that the Fate Freeport Companion may be what you want to look at. While it is not Fate Accelerated it is a similar lite setup in terms of mechanics. As for Fate compared to Dungeon World. I find Fate extraordinary straightforward to run. The problem with most games with universal mechanics is they can wind up ...


2

I think you are expecting too much from them in their first adventures. Ignoring that they are kids, even adults may not think in such a tactical manner. Why would they know to 'cover their bases'? Its completely outside most people's life experiences. Experienced gamers know because they've learned the hard way what happens if they don't. Inexperienced ...



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