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30

Read To Him You should be doing this anyway because reading to kids is good for them in general, but it's really handy here. Both to encourage reading, and by mixing in stories of adventure you can let him use his imagination and foster that type of development. Play Games With Him You're already doing this. Keep it up! Make believe games are great, as ...


22

Engage Your Kids in Shared Storytelling Just as reading to your children is hugely important to foster a future love of reading, I think story-telling is an important activity, too. When my kids were little, I'd sometimes engage them in shared story-telling. Give them an opening theme - "One day, Prince Jacob rode out of his castle early in the morning to ...


10

I have, I kid you not, been running a My Little Pony Campaign in the Fate system. It's got to be the most ludicrously non-violent game, of any sort, I've ever played. And it works quite well in that system because everything (including any sort of violence) comes down to a certain set of skills rather than the use of an object that your character ...


9

I have experience bringing kids (my own son and his friends) into RPGs. I have experience with Dungeon World. I have experience with Fate and FAE. However - I do not have experience introducing kids to RPGs with Dungeon World or FAE. Just to be explicitly clear. With that being said, as the probable instigator of this question, I feel that it is incumbent ...


9

focus on games involving a physical object, yet using imagination The floor is lava is a great example of this (so long as you supervise and don't mind your kid getting all over your furniture). It lets you and your child utilize your everyday surroundings to create fun. Build Forts with pillows, blankets and furniture. Pillow forts (as I call them) were a ...


8

Create stories and adventures with toys, plush and otherwise. Give them persistent personalities. Get the child to participate in these fantasy adventures. Stuff like: Teddy bear goes on adventure to find the cookies. How does teddy get down? How does teddy avoid the cat/dog (ie wandering guard)? how does teddy get up to the cookies? etc.


7

After a quick chat with @Joshua Aslan Smith, I feel good about Dungeon World due to the lesser use of mechanical terms when playing. This is what he said that convinced me: So as one of the commentators said basically the majority of Dungeon worlds rules are on the GM side I should find some play examples (also if you watch that video someone linked ...


5

I successfully raised two kids now 19 & 17 who have both become avid RPG gamers themselves. I think some of the points brought up here are exactly right. I read to them all the time, and they grew up watching my friends and I RPGing. But I also took an interest in their own pretend games they made up themselves. I slowly introduced them to setting up ...


5

The most child friendly RPG I can think of is the Adventure Time RPG based on 4th edition D&D. It's got great art, really straight forward and all the characters, races and classes are based on Adventure Time. You can download it freely from the author here The kids I played it with were from 10 - 13. 2 of them fans of Adventure Time, the others had ...


4

For a while I've been running a tabletop RPG for a 14-year-old boy with Autism who uses it as an emotion regulator. The game obviously has to be a little different since he needs a unique experience. Here are a few things that you might be able to apply. When the enemies are too scary or strong, just run. Focus on remaining unseen, solving puzzles, talking ...


3

I've played games where violence is an option, but rarely occurs. The players and NPCs are usually reasonable enough to settle their differences through diplomacy. My fellow players and I are adults, but there's no reason why this couldn't work for kids. From my (not so recent) experience, some systems (like D&D) are combat heavy and relatively light ...


3

We have run several campaigns in the Mouse Guard RPG, which is based on the burning wheel rules. Though I believe it is hard to find a book for the RPG now, if you are lucky to find one in a local book shop or used I highly recommend it. It does have rules for conflicts and resolutions to those conflicts with violence, however, they are not needed at all to ...


2

One thought: Expose him to acting -- children's theater and so on -- to show him that adults can also play "make believe" though they usually do it in a somewhat more structured way. Another, a few years from now: There are now LARP (Live Action Role-Playing) groups in many elementary schools and high schools. That may hold the attention of kids better ...


2

Your mention of Freeport leads me to think that the Fate Freeport Companion may be what you want to look at. While it is not Fate Accelerated it is a similar lite setup in terms of mechanics. As for Fate compared to Dungeon World. I find Fate extraordinary straightforward to run. The problem with most games with universal mechanics is they can wind up ...


2

Depending upon one's own tastes, I can recommend three different game engines I've used with children. Tunnels and Trolls - any edition. If the kids can handle rolling and adding piles of dice (a typical starting character is rolling between 3 and 10 dice for attacking). Requires additions well into the double digits, but otherwise, it's simple, and ...


1

You might want to look at John Harpers World of Dungeons, which is like the accelerated edition of Dungeon World (you can download it at the front page of http://www.dungeon-world.com/) There is a fun thread on Story Games show how far you can get with these simple rules here John Harper further developed the idea in Wildlings, a game that has a strong ...


1

I'm finding Pathfinder very easy to pick up for kids since it's actually the first RPG I've presented to my kids. My youngest is 9 and she loves it, my second youngest is 16 and she is so enamored with it she's getting some of her friends to come over this next week and wants them to play. Let me add a caveat to this though: We've been playing with the ...



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