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45

You shouldn't do this Your stated goal is to introduce your 9 year old to gaming. Does your 9 year old still enjoy Dora the Explorer? Would playing in a soccer game with her 4 year old sister be a real game or just a goof? Would you have them playing the same instrument together to learn it? Do they play each other on Wii/360 games without it ending up in ...


30

I'm not familiar with D&D so this will be a system agnostic answer. What you could do is provide an in-game explanation as to why the character of the youngest daughter sometimes disappears from the game or does strange things. Give her a character with a chaotic neutral allignment and take over some of the narrative aspects of the game for her. She ...


26

I DM a 3.5 game and have a one year old. Yes, they will cause disruptions. They won't be the only things that do. Disruptions Happen The truth about "immersion" is that disruptions happen. That's the reality of tabletop gaming. They happen because the kids are running around, or they wake up, or the phone rings, or you need to pull something out of the ...


9

I have played a bunch very simplified D&D dungeon crawl games with my 4.5 year old, using the D&D boardgames (http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/59946/dungeons-dragons-castle-ravenloft-board-game and such) for most of the content. The included rules are almost like the 'big editions' of D&D but includes a number of simplifications already - such ...


8

I will expand on this tommorow, but three things from my personal experience. Obviously it will depend on the individual children. Feel free to invite the 7 year old to play. If your child is mature enough, and depending on the relationship between the children, it's possible to have a 7 year old play a character, as well as have the younger children be ...


7

Another solution is play tabletop RPGs online with your friends in the evening, after your children's bedtime. This avoids problems with finding babysitters, interruptions while playing, and of course the huge disruption to your kid's bedtime routine if there are a bunch of people in your house talking & laughing. I'm a father of a 4 year old and have ...


6

I agree with mxyzplk, in that I think the 4 year old shouldn't really play the game, or you'll weaken the 9 year old's enjoyment of it; but I do think you can involve her without doing too much damage to the 9 year old's enjoyment. I haven't done this with D&D, but with other games with my nephews (7 and 4 at the time) what we'd do is play with the 7 ...


6

I speak from experience when I tell you that starting them at a young age can be done. I began playing D&D (2e) with my two sons at ages 8 and 3 respectively. We have gamed together for over 10 years now, and both my sons have gone on to play and gamemaster with their friends (2e, 4e). We are all now learning 5e. First of all, I can not overstate the ...


4

Systems As one part of this, I would take a look at the wide variety of RPGs now available that are aimed directly at younger players. In order of ascending complexity, I would first look at the following games: Do: Pilgrims of the Flying Temple: I had an absolute blast playing this game with the designer a few GenCons ago - so you and your wife won't get ...


3

Challenge just means interesting and engaging so give him what he enjoys. For my kids when they were young, they mainly seemed to enjoy laughing at crazy hinjinks (usually involving assorted bodily fluids and trickery). For children, challenge simply means "play." I wouldn't read anything more into it, or try to engage on an adult level. My advice is to ...


2

The Champions Complete book might be just what you're looking for. According to the product description At 240 pages, Champions Complete includes everything superhero gamers need, and nothing they don't. New players will love the unmatched freedom of Champions that allows them to create and play exactly the hero they imagine. Longtime fans will ...


2

May I also suggest the Hero System Sidekick book. Here is what the store says about it: Sidekick contains all of the core HERO System rules, including character creation, combat and adventuring, and equipment ? but without all of the additions, options, and details found in the standard rulebook. Sidekick boils the HERO System down to its essential ...


1

I recommend taking a look at story-driven RPG systems. My favourite/most familiar example is Dungeon World, but I think 13th Age is a similar approach (and may be more familiar to you with a D20 background). Conflict framework In terms of the challenge, I recommend creating a conflict framework for your story. By this I mean some way of easily ...


1

I'm a psychology student and for my thesis I developed a simplified version of D&D with the aim of developing social competence in agressive or withdrawn children. I found in my searches that the minimal age to enjoy fully group activities is 7 years old, an age when the children are more capable of focusing on the others, of cooperate... I think like ...


1

I can't speak from the perspective of new to tabletop because I've been playing for 35 years; however I can speak to the experience of having small children at the game. I recently started running (and hosting) a D&D 3.5 game, and two of my players have a child just short of two years old who they bring to the game. I also have a 12-year-old, who ...



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