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2

Challenge just means interesting and engaging so give him what he enjoys. For my kids when they were young, they mainly seemed to enjoy laughing at crazy hinjinks (usually involving assorted bodily fluids and trickery). For children, challenge simply means "play." I wouldn't read anything more into it, or try to engage on an adult level. My advice is to ...


5

I speak from experience when I tell you that starting them at a young age can be done. I began playing D&D (2e) with my two sons at ages 8 and 3 respectively. We have gamed together for over 10 years now, and both my sons have gone on to play and gamemaster with their friends (2e, 4e). We are all now learning 5e. First of all, I can not overstate the ...


3

Systems As one part of this, I would take a look at the wide variety of RPGs now available that are aimed directly at younger players. In order of ascending complexity, I would first look at the following games: Do: Pilgrims of the Flying Temple: I had an absolute blast playing this game with the designer a few GenCons ago - so you and your wife won't get ...


0

I recommend taking a look at story-driven RPG systems. My favourite/most familiar example is Dungeon World, but I think 13th Age is a similar approach (and may be more familiar to you with a D20 background). Conflict framework In terms of the challenge, I recommend creating a conflict framework for your story. By this I mean some way of easily ...


-3

Perhaps including a physical element to it would help, say... Repainting the back side of a simple puzzle thematically, or having him use legos to try and make a tool to be used in the story.


1

I'm a psychology student and for my thesis I developed a simplified version of D&D with the aim of developing social competence in agressive or withdrawn children. I found in my searches that the minimal age to enjoy fully group activities is 7 years old, an age when the children are more capable of focusing on the others, of cooperate... I think like ...


6

I agree with mxyzplk, in that I think the 4 year old shouldn't really play the game, or you'll weaken the 9 year old's enjoyment of it; but I do think you can involve her without doing too much damage to the 9 year old's enjoyment. I haven't done this with D&D, but with other games with my nephews (7 and 4 at the time) what we'd do is play with the 7 ...


42

You shouldn't do this Your stated goal is to introduce your 9 year old to gaming. Does your 9 year old still enjoy Dora the Explorer? Would playing in a soccer game with her 4 year old sister be a real game or just a goof? Would you have them playing the same instrument together to learn it? Do they play each other on Wii/360 games without it ending up in ...


9

I have played a bunch very simplified D&D dungeon crawl games with my 4.5 year old, using the D&D boardgames (http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/59946/dungeons-dragons-castle-ravenloft-board-game and such) for most of the content. The included rules are almost like the 'big editions' of D&D but includes a number of simplifications already - such ...


27

I'm not familiar with D&D so this will be a system agnostic answer. What you could do is provide an in-game explanation as to why the character of the youngest daughter sometimes disappears from the game or does strange things. Give her a character with a chaotic neutral allignment and take over some of the narrative aspects of the game for her. She ...


-1

I don't believe there can be a right answer, but since children usually have a hard time staying focused for a long time i'd make sure to keep them active and engaged in the game. The thing I'd focus on would be the setting; trying to make them focus on the sense of Wonder of exploring an unknown world and their characters' possibilities.



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