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1

If you run a group focused on role-playing and stories, don't tell the players specific stats like armor class or DMG unless you see the need to. If your group is more combat-heavy, then stats would be more appropriate. No rule in the book really provides concrete guidelines to structuring knowledge checks. I am aware that this question is asking about 5th ...


8

There are no, concrete RAW monster knowledge checks in 5e The PHB, MM, and DMG do not mention anything like a monster knowledge check as existed in previous editions. Tied with that is the fact that monster types are not directly tied to skills. As such I can only offer guidelines based on my own experiences with 4e and 5e and what I have done as a GM. Go ...


4

If there is a loremaster type character in my group I focus more on lore as a central part of the game plot. If the only lore in the game the group need to progress is for example some historic event you either know about or you don't there is no way to make a loremaster mechanic interesting no matter the method of knowledge transfer you use. Instead I try ...


-1

There are many things you can do to give a loremaster archetype something to do that they choose. Others have already discussed the 'player as GM' and 'loremaster must choose specific questions to ask' solutions, so I will mention a 3rd. Games can range anywhere from groups where you make an assumption that all the characters and players, will be working ...


5

If the information is solely limited to things the GM has decided - then yes, you are stuck with the mouthpiece issue, as tabletop RPGs are played through conversation, and if only one person can declare facts, then that is what you end up with. However, allowing players to make input can vary greatly in scope, and maybe one of these will work better for ...


6

Option 3, All the Way! You act like option 3 is a joke, but it doesn't have to be. In my campaigns, most of my players write 2-3 page backstories (of their own volition), and I try to help each of them determine how their background fits into the current campaign. I also end up writing 1-2 paragraphs about each important location, event and NPC for my own ...


18

I'm going to take a slightly different tack here, because it sounds like the question is about games where the GM doesn't want to cede the authority to the player to "just make stuff up." And even in games where the GM does, sometimes it's not appropriate. The method I've used, with reasonable success, goes something like this: Keep the information per ...


2

Disclaimer: Which tactic is best depends, as always, on the style/theme of your game, the scope of lore being discussed, and the players involved. Empower the player to alter the setting: Defer to Jadasc's fuller answer: let the player improvise, and treat anything they say as fact unless it contradicts a previous fact/event of the campaign, or a major ...


6

There's not a lot to be done here in the general case. The three options you listed are pretty much definitive. You need to push information from the GM to a player, and it's unlikely that you'll know what information needs to be pushed in advance. You could do something crazy, like write up a comprehensive wiki of your campaign world and give the ...


30

Let the loremaster improvise. Start with the premise that "loremaster" doesn't mean "omniscience" or "retrocognition." There are many things that are not written down, not on the grid, were never recorded in lore, or have simply been forgotten or altered with time. Make sure the player has a solid grasp of the themes of the game. When it comes time for ...


4

I prefer (iv), give the loremaster an overview and then make them ask for more details. For example: GM: "You know this and that about <some corporation>, you also have more details, feel free to ask." Player: "Do I know who is the head of that corporation?" GM: "Yes, you do, it is <that guy>" Player: "And do I also know the ...



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