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21

Only gods and angels can speak Supernal so that all may understand. Your quote is from the Dungeon Master's Guide (page 171) then re-phrased by the Rules Compendium (a more up-to-date version of the rules), which actually says this: The gods have their own language, Supernal, which they share with their angelic servants. When a god or angel speaks ...


14

Fractal is the way to go here. Try this on for size, some trimming may be needed for it to fit perfectly. I'm going to be assuming she speaks Latin fluently, and the rest of the party speaks modern English where assumptions need to be made. High Concept: Language Barrier Aspects: Romance Language Family, Ancient Tongue, Seeming Similarity ...


11

A possible explanation on the limit Upon browsing the Core Rulebook, Humans have the ability to learn any language with Intelligence Bonus points (other than "secret" languages). Surprisingly, Half-Elves also have this ability. To my mind, this is the developers trying to make humans more appealing than non-humans.. Maybe it is just the groups I have ...


10

Plot: Learn it from someone who knows it One would presume that should a druid decide to teach you Druidic, then you could spend a skill rank or two on Speak Languages to learn the language. That would be a DM’s call and probably quite rare, but it could happen. A blighter (Complete Divine) certainly wouldn’t care about teaching the language, ...


9

Since you're already calling upon a Fate Core concept to establish this dilemma -- the Fate fractal -- I'm comfortable suggesting that you use another Fate Core system to address it: the more complex rules for consequences, particularly the rules for recovery on FC164. Establish the "inability to communicate" as a Severe Consequence, and then treat efforts ...


8

Many spells that produce minions include text that specifies what the critters do if not specifically commanded otherwise. Summon Monster I, for example, says that creatures not otherwise commanded will attack the caster's enemies to the best of their ability. Ghoul Army has no such text. As a result, the ghouls and ghast created by Ghoul Army are under no ...


6

This is a question of character knowledge versus player knowledge. Cryptanalysis is a fun, if little used, human skill. Some players will delight in solving cryptographic puzzles, and 4e certainly doesn't prohibit the gamist approach of "challenge the player." On the other hand, cryptanalysis is highly binary. People either really like it, or basically ...


5

It’s a historical thing; it works the same way it did in D&D 3.5. I completely agree with you and think it doesn’t really have any place in the racial properties. It’s setting-dependent cultural detail that any given individual may not adhere to. PCs, in particularly, are usually exceptional in many regards; while most dwarves may not ...


5

If you'd like more creative control over the language barrier, you can simply create an aspect to represent it, then refine the aspect over time using the character advancement and change rules (Fate Core p. 256, FAE p. 33). Example: Alice plays Yuri, a defector from Eastern Europe. He starts play with “In Soviet Russia, They Don't Speak English.” Alice ...


5

Building on Jadasc's answer: For a non-human character like a space alien or a fairy, you can model this with a stunt that modifies the game rules. For example: Because I am a resilient plant creature, I get an additional mild consequence slot. The slot is initially filled with the consequence “Doesn't speak the local language.” This stunt does not count ...


4

I have a few ideas, but they do not involve FATE mechanics, they are quite system agnostic. On the other hand, they may not fit your setting, game mood or personal preferences, still Im going to give it a shot. Charades This may not work very well, it may also work great - did you consider making it a little charades game? Lay out some ground rules, ban ...


4

As you say, this prevents the creation of unordinary characters by default, and works to maintain world coherence which is essential for maintaining and strengthening suspension of disbelief. It is a game design decision. Sure, it's just a guideline, as are all the rules... for the DM, mainly, as players can ignore it only with the DM's approval (or at the ...


3

A further alternative method to learn Druidic could be a extremely challenging Decipher Script using collected notes written in Druidic and knowing the context. However even just finding written Druidic equivalent of the Rosetta Stone (Most likely written in Druidic, Elven and Sylvan) would be a quest in itself as I imagine it is rare one of a kind marker of ...


3

pathfinder inherited this from dnd-3.5e. I found no explanation from the authors why a limited list exists, so the answer given here is only a speculation. A limited list of bonus languages helps defining the race's place in the world. E.g.: in most settings, gnomes have typical friends (elves, feys, dwarves) and foes (giants, orcs, kobolds, and goblinoids) ...


3

It is very easy to create a 1 to 1 cipher which will sound linguistically plausible. I've done this several times, for many different languages. It's also easy enough to break that, given enough text, the players could figure it out. Effectively, what you do is map vowels to other vowels, and consonants to other consonants, and drop Y (and likely also C and ...



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