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39

This is a place where you should probably revert to descriptive GMing rather than reciting the character's lines. Say something like: The Elf approaches you (the dwarf) and says something in a language you don't understand. It sounds like elf talk to you, but you don't have any idea what he's saying. Your player can then react to this situation. If ...


27

Unless you and the players speak Elvish, you have three options: Say that they're speaking another language without saying what it is. Say that they're speaking Elvish. Say a few Elvish words for flavor. To decide which option to use, think about the effects of each: The party only knows that this language is one they themselves don't speak. The ...


18

There's a pronunciation guide on the Wikipedia Page, which references an old FAQ, for whatever that's worth. Essentially it's pronounced how its spelled, no real trick to it. Might help to think of it as "Smurf-Neblin", only with a V instead of the M in smurf. Doesn't really roll off the tongue no matter how you pronounce it, but I'd guess that's half the ...


16

Yes, RAW others can learn. Drow Sign Language is a bonus language for drow; others have to spend skill points to learn it. It has no alphabet or written form. (FRCS, p. 13) As always DMs can rule however they want and may require you to find a willing drow to teach you. (If I allowed it, I would require this.)


15

Thieves' Cant isn't a written language, thus there would be nothing to understand via a spell. Nowhere in the quote you've pulled (or the PHB) is thieves' cant ever described as a written language. This is because thieves' cant is both verbal and physical communication. Some word substitution (1 to 1) is used, but it is largely based on metaphor and ...


11

As stated in your excerpt from the players' handbook, thieves cant isn't realy a language unto itself, but a way to put hidden messages into an existing one. As such, using comprehend languages or tongues would allow you to understand the language being used, but not the message hidden in thieves' cant. Think for example, someone saying 'I need to see a man ...


11

You don’t need rules to roleplay your character – this should not be random Just roleplay. Think about what your character hears and how he might misinterpret. Think about some odd phrasings that he might use, as too-direct translations of his own language, using syntax and idioms that Common doesn’t. And use these. Stay in character, and be honest about ...


9

No. Wizards has not licensed a German translation of D&D 5e. D&D 5e also does not have an open license, so any instance of the text of all the spells appearing on a Web site would be illegal, in any language.


8

It might be possible to reconstruct a couple of basic words through cryptographic analyzation. But that most certainly would be the work of months or years and not something do to within minutes or hours. Best chance would be to figure out some gramatic rules, but it would probably be impossible to learn the meaning of nouns or verbs. You might even be able ...


7

Here, it's worth noting David Drake's comments on translating from future/ancient languages: One of the problems when you’re writing of either the past or the future is ‘How much should I translate?’ I don’t mean simply language: there’s a whole complex of things that people within any society take for granted but which vary between societies. (But ...


7

Swearing doesn't appear to have changed much from the present day. In the core book alone, fuck (or some variation like clusterfuck) appears 36 times, shit (or some variation like bullshit) appears 14 times, and damn appears 7 times. I could keep searching, but from all the fiction I've read swearing hasn't evolved. There is plenty of new terminology/slang ...


6

No. Not in the least reasons being that cryptography is the creation of cipher and code methodologies, and cryptanalysis is the skill of turning encrypted text into plain text. While they may go hand in hand, they are not necessarily the same thing. However, cryptanalysis still somewhat relies on the person doing the code breaking to either be a native or ...


5

I would say no. Cryptography is the skill/art of encoding and decrypting messages, breaking and creating such codes. A Cryptographer might be able to decrypt a book, only to find that it is in a language that they don't speak. This happens often in the modern world.


5

There is nothing inherently wrong with sharing secret information; I have done it myself by either sharing notes or talking with individual players in private. I believe it is possible to offer some basic guidelines: Share information quickly, a few words at most. Players may lose interest if you spend too much time in secret communication with any one of ...


4

Everyone in The Hobbit spoke Westron. The Hobbits, the Dwarves, the Elves, the Istari, the Goblins, the Wargs, the Dragon, the thrush... Sometimes even common animals seems to understand it, When Bilbo find the Spiders and listens their words, he is wearing the Ring. I don't know if this is the power of the Ring, translating the Spider's language as it ...


3

Don't do this. I've run remote games with sidechannels before, and unless the game is about the side channel (i.e. using the paranoia java app that does all sorts of cute things) trying to keep track of state (the status of all the secret information in my head), the narrative (what's going on) typing (which is still slower than talking) and keeping track ...


3

In the Hobbit, the Trolls, Eagles, Orcs/Goblins, Dragon, some Ravens, and (maybe) the Spiders all spoke Common (Westron). The Wargs, Thrushes, and Crows did not speak Common, but understood Common. In the scene with the Wargs, Tolkien states that Gandalf understood the Warg's hideous language, and that was why he knew (and the reader knows) what they are ...


3

Some languages are more common than others. Given that everyone knows common for free, languages that are shared are less valuable. Some races DO possess the ability to learn any language with their bonus languages, or even get more languages for free per point of linguistics. Languages that are extremely rare but not secret (e.g. Otyugh scent, Mi-Go, ...


3

Dungeons and Dragons 3.5 doesn't have something such as that. I may be mistaken, but I doubt it; not including homebrew. The SRD entry for the Speak Language skill says: You don’t make Speak Language checks. You either know a language or you don’t. There is a d20 solution (If I remember correctly) Ravenloft: Masque of the Red Death utilizes ...


3

Another option is to describe not only the elf's spoken language, but also their body language. Anyone who's annoyed with you is going to have plainly obvious behaviour, such as: a frown 'knitted' eyebrows increased colouring to their cheeks abrupt gestures such as hand slashing and finger stabbing Also, their language might be sharper, their ...


2

Use actual alternate languages, via automated translation software. Here is a chart I put together for a game I was in, based on what people had already chosen to use at various points. (The chart shows the same sentence translated into each language.) Except for Dwarven, which was based on Skyrim's Dragon Language, everyone just plugged what they wanted ...


2

This harks back to one of the major rules for storytelling in scifi and fantasy: "The less you explain, the more believable it is." What this statement really means is that people will fill in "hand waving" with what makes sense to them. The more details you provide, the more hooks there are for disagreement, arguments and disputes (and the greater ...


2

I believe a person whose native language isn't your setting's variation of Common wouldn't translate any swear words into Common. (I'd certainly either swear as it's used in English or in non-translated Russian) For such a person I'd suggest something like the system I've used for my dwarf character (an expanded version): Swear object verb (halden) - it's ...


1

I suggest using a single chat room, but putting tags around text when it's in a different language: Thief: <Halfling>Hey, should we loot this guy before the party notices?</Halfling> Sorceror: <Halfling>Yeah, I'll distract them.</Halfling> Paladin: What? Sorceror: I think I see an evildoer over there! For your Orks, you ...


1

The language of the old ones is called R'lyehian, which according to the mythos is a pale approximation of how it is pronounced. Similar to spelling the word a dog might speak being spelled bark or woof.


1

Because your DM has blessed this character concept, I'm not going to tell you not to do it, and I'll assume you're all adults (or close enough) who know what they're doing. D&D 3.5e doesn't have native rules for this level of language detail. Modelling degrees of language (in)comprehension is actually quite common in other RPGs with more developed ...


1

Read texts on these languages until you get like they sound. Then learn how to gibber and sound similarly. I have done it many times, specially with Sindarin. You don't have to me a master in Tolkien languages to make a decent impression. Problem is, are there written texts on D&D elvish and dwarvish? If not, you should look for something similar. For ...


1

I've seen this addressed with specific software (a .php chat) allowing people to use tags to encase the spoken part. The result of someone writing between [elven]TEXT[/elven] would be something on the lines of (Elven) "TEXT". Using a different color to make the (Elven) part strike out from the rest of the description would be nice. One advantage of this ...



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