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21

Only gods and angels can speak Supernal so that all may understand. Your quote is from the Dungeon Master's Guide (page 171) then re-phrased by the Rules Compendium (a more up-to-date version of the rules), which actually says this: The gods have their own language, Supernal, which they share with their angelic servants. When a god or angel speaks ...


11

A possible explanation on the limit Upon browsing the Core Rulebook, Humans have the ability to learn any language with Intelligence Bonus points (other than "secret" languages). Surprisingly, Half-Elves also have this ability. To my mind, this is the developers trying to make humans more appealing than non-humans.. Maybe it is just the groups I have ...


10

Plot: Learn it from someone who knows it One would presume that should a druid decide to teach you Druidic, then you could spend a skill rank or two on Speak Languages to learn the language. That would be a DM’s call and probably quite rare, but it could happen. A blighter (Complete Divine) certainly wouldn’t care about teaching the language, ...


8

Many spells that produce minions include text that specifies what the critters do if not specifically commanded otherwise. Summon Monster I, for example, says that creatures not otherwise commanded will attack the caster's enemies to the best of their ability. Ghoul Army has no such text. As a result, the ghouls and ghast created by Ghoul Army are under no ...


5

It’s a historical thing; it works the same way it did in D&D 3.5. I completely agree with you and think it doesn’t really have any place in the racial properties. It’s setting-dependent cultural detail that any given individual may not adhere to. PCs, in particularly, are usually exceptional in many regards; while most dwarves may not ...


4

As you say, this prevents the creation of unordinary characters by default, and works to maintain world coherence which is essential for maintaining and strengthening suspension of disbelief. It is a game design decision. Sure, it's just a guideline, as are all the rules... for the DM, mainly, as players can ignore it only with the DM's approval (or at the ...


3

A further alternative method to learn Druidic could be a extremely challenging Decipher Script using collected notes written in Druidic and knowing the context. However even just finding written Druidic equivalent of the Rosetta Stone (Most likely written in Druidic, Elven and Sylvan) would be a quest in itself as I imagine it is rare one of a kind marker of ...


3

pathfinder inherited this from dnd-3.5e. I found no explanation from the authors why a limited list exists, so the answer given here is only a speculation. A limited list of bonus languages helps defining the race's place in the world. E.g.: in most settings, gnomes have typical friends (elves, feys, dwarves) and foes (giants, orcs, kobolds, and goblinoids) ...


1

Use actual alternate languages, via automated translation software. Here is a chart I put together for a game I was in, based on what people had already chosen to use at various points. (The chart shows the same sentence translated into each language.) Except for Dwarven, which was based on Skyrim's Dragon Language, everyone just plugged what they wanted ...


1

I've seen this addressed with specific software (a .php chat) allowing people to use tags to encase the spoken part. The result of someone writing between [elven]TEXT[/elven] would be something on the lines of (Elven) "TEXT". Using a different color to make the (Elven) part strike out from the rest of the description would be nice. One advantage of this ...



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