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20

Rules as written: the subtleties of "can see" you're reading into don't exist. Whether you "can see" something mechanically means "you have line of sight to it." This heavily implied by the Player's Handbook, and finally made explicit in the Rules Compendium's section of Line of Sight on p106: A few powers do require a user to be able to see a creature ...


15

This is obviously unintended. Any workaround which utterly invalidates a mechanic is probably unintended and should be treated with extreme caution. You say it yourself: if this is allowed, the proximity restriction completely disappears and you can curse whomever you feel like You're proposing something which effectively removes a restriction from a ...


13

Range: Personal or targeted at yourself Cast normally Has a Target entry You must be able to see or touch the target, and you must specifically choose that target. When blind, your only solution is to touch the target. If you are the target, this is automatic. Otherwise, the Invisibility entry of the Glossary provides an option when the location of ...


12

In the first case, it is clear that the attacker has line of sight. The attacker is totally unobstructed from the target. In the second case, the attacker does not have line of sight, and cannot attack the target with a sight-dependent attack. The attacker could, however, move to the side, which would allow them to attack the target (whou would have ...


7

In 4E, teleports require line of sight, but do not require line of effect. You could teleport through a glass window, no problem. So, in general, if a power gives you line of sight where otherwise you would not have it, the answer is "yes, you can teleport there". That is provided the distance teleported from your location does not exceed normal ...


6

No, out-of-sight enemies are not a problem for a Warlock's Curse (unless, y'know, an out-of-sight enemy is the one you want to curse). Let's review the first sentence of the Warlock's Curse, which is the only one specifying who you can target: Once per turn as a minor action, you can place a Warlock’s Curse on the enemy nearest to you that you can see. ...


5

It might help to understand why Warlock's Curse works the way it does. Premise: D&D 4th edition is, first and foremost, a combat game, not a fictional-life simulator. All the combat mechanics are designed to facilitate combat, not replicate reality. 4th edition is very much inspired by game design advances made in video game RPGs, particularly MMORPGs, ...


4

That would make intuitive sense, but D&D 4e dispenses with intuition in favour of tightly-defined, interlocking rules that do all and only what they say they do. In this case, we look at the definition of "obscured square". The only effect of obscured squares is to grant concealment (Total Concealment in this case, of heavy obscurement) to targets in ...



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