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31

You can have several tricks to get around this, I've used similar methods with fantasy and cyberpunk games. Security Weapons are keycoded, or Palmprinting - this stops anyone but a certain person using it. Yes you can bypass it, but it's either difficult or very pricey. Limited uses Yes, you've got a melta gun - but getting ammo/powerpacks for it is ...


26

As noted, this is a player decision rather than a GM one. However, here is the system that one of my groups used to good effect in the past: Loot is pooled until the end of the night or adventure (although particularly powerful upgrades may be lent out on a temporary basis). Calculate the total sell value of the pool of items (that is, how much the players ...


24

The biggest difference between fantasy and sci-fi notions of value is that: ideas have value Therefore, besides the standard stuff players receive, they can also discover what amounts to IP. One of the oddest forms of IP is actually Real Estate, as it's a purely symbolic agreement that X owns area Y, even though X may not sit on Y with guns. (Note how this ...


19

Choose whatever looks appropriate, plus a few flavourful items for theme, from TreantMonk's Guide, and Bunko's Bargain Basement. Choose flavourful items that will prove to be macguffins for your campaign. He explores all the magic items someone would have. An 18th level wizard will have 3 categories of items. "Junk I collected," "Stuff that's applicable to ...


17

Most people don't keep piles of gold under their beds, especially when they're as wealthy as a Lvl 18 character. Furthermore, wealth doesn't need to mean gold pieces either, but can be tied up in all kinds of assets. Finally, the wizard is evil. That gives us a lot to work with. Here are a few suggestions: The money is safely tucked away in investments. ...


17

First off, since the question is tagged rogue-trader, I'll reiterate that the PCs are already able to get their hands on the best gear out there anyhow. "You're the owners and command staff of a 5km warpship with access to resources in excess of some worlds' annual gross planetary production" will get you pretty far. As in, if you want to buy a melta gun, ...


14

I notice that you didn't tag this question with a D&D tag, so I'm going to add an answer that doesn't assume D&D party dynamics. If both players want their characters to get a particular piece of loot, awesome! They have their characters in a conflict, which is what makes stories interesting. Run with it. In this case, I would turn it over to the ...


12

It sounds like you're asking two questions here: first, what items can the PCs pick up from enemies, and second, what properties do those items retain from enemies' stat blocks? 1) What items can PCs pick up? In theory, everything the enemy is listed as carrying. In reality, as Lucas says in his answer, picking up everything quickly becomes hugely ...


11

DMG2 has a good suggestion intended for DMs wanting to run a low-magic game that I have adopted to help my problems with the treasure parcel system. Basically, you incorporate the average bonuses all those magic items provide into the character advancement. If you start with this, you take away the problem of players NEEDING x number of magic items to be ...


11

This is my crazy idea for playing D&D 4: make the characters some sort of elite strike force. They've already got the powers for that. If there's this military organization that they are part of, then they can requisition items they will need. Before adventures, they can go to the quartermaster and get the magic items they've requisitioned. The items ...


11

Hopefully, you've got one PC acting as group leader. Assuming he's trying to be fair, all loot should be evenly divided at the end of a story arc. Of course, if you've got this, you probably wouldn't need to ask the question. As GM, you can give gold to each player while looting an area. This may lead to PCs trying to loot areas first and keep everything ...


9

To preface this I am a relatively new DM, (only DMing for a year and all of it 4E) so my advice may not hold the weight of experience some of these other may have. What I do for loot is hand my players about eight playing cards (any kind will do as long as they all match.) Then I have them write the items they want on them. I do the same with about double ...


9

I like the idea, but it's too rich. You're basically saying a 1 HD creature is worth 75 gp equivalent value (as it's one to one to gp when used to make magic items), so it needs to give 75 gp less in cash money. Refer to the Pathfinder treasure value per encounter guidelines. Let's compare against the example they use of an EL10 encounter with an 8 HD ...


9

Earthdawn explicitly includes a system where players who keep a scribe or cartographer among their characters to chronicle their journeys get a reward. My one caution to doing something like this is to make sure that there is something that everyone can do, or distribute the rewards evenly (or at least sanely cap them) so that there's no huge boost to one ...


9

The Rules Compendium has what you're looking for. The Rules Compendium, p 295, has random loot tables in lieu of treasure parcels. This answer discusses the fundamental mechanics, It also looks like someone has made an excel spreadsheet to do the rolling for you.


8

The players should be able to work this out on their own, with minimal DM involvement. However, as the DM is generally held to be the moderator of the game, it may occasionally fall to them to resolve disputes. Of course, there are probably as many ways to solve this as there are DMs in the world. Probably the most commonly-agreeable method is a d20 ...


8

You can leave stuff that isn't important lying around. It's possible/likely that he'd have a few basic pieces of treasure lying around as mementos. +1 spears, swords and other exotic weapons are pretty much decoration to an 18th level wizard. The big stuff should be in a vault - something that is going to be difficult for other people who aren't of a ...


8

You will find all the relevant rules on pages 400-401 of the book. Here is a summary. The basic rule is that an encounter only give you a stack of gold: A lvl8 encounter gives you 3350gp of gold and jewelery, and that's it. However, the DM is encouraged to add Magic Items to the treasure. The DM thinks that the characters could benefit from ...


8

I was first introduced to this idea in the Amber Diceless Roleplaying Game, which encouraged player involvement by awarding Good Stuff (a mix of character-building points and general karma) for out-of-character actions. The main ones used there were more fitting for the Amber setting - drawing character cards (Trumps) of the characters, or writing ...


7

I ask my players to email me anytime they think of or read something they'd like their PC to have. I keep these requests in a list. Then I tap this list often: When equipping NPCs. I especially like NPCs who strutt around wearing or brandishing stuff PCs want. One time an NPC fop used his ring of invisibility to impress girls at a feast and play tricks on ...


6

I had the same problem as a Technomancer: you are basically a Hacker who doesn't have to buy a good commlink or great programs (and as an Alias follower, I couldn't even spend on a Lifestyle). You have two options there: If you don't want to do drones: Buy huge guns. Buy a huge war, and don't worry about encumbrance. You can even consider "burning" one ...


5

If it's a one-off incident, then yeah, let them work it out on their own. If it turns into an extended conflict that's annoying the other players, tell them to drop it for now and work it out between sessions. If you're having consistent issues of this kind, you need to talk to your players -- and get them to talk to each other. Designing treasure around ...


5

You should NEVER give your players items they will just sell. A lot of the love for random loot comes from 3.5, where that was how you were supposed to give out loot. It's important to remember that 4e is not balanced around random loot; instead, it is balanced around the idea that every single item the party finds will be useful to them. Consider the ...


5

I'd probably use this for an adventure springboard. It'll buy you some time, and you can then decide later how much of the treasure is left for the players. Examples include: Theft. Have a thief (or, better yet, Thieves' Guild) waltz in and help themselves. The PCs can go and fetch the treasure back, but some or most of it may have been used up or sold. ...


5

It...doesn't The random treasure rules aren't really one of 3.X's prize pieces of writing. There's no table that I'm aware of that provides advice on how to hand out loot for mixed-creature encounters, and modules (Expedition to Undermountain etc) are almost wholly useless as examples since all of their loot comes pre-done with little explanation or ...


5

The "Artist" and "Scribe" are quite useful the campaign, and I also agree with lisardggY's suggestions about transportation and centralized documentation to follow the game. That said, here are my additions: While the specific game escapes me (I believe it was a White Wolf book), they suggest offering XP to whomever brings snacks for the table. As a ...


5

The kobolds' shields are unrelated to their fire resist, technically. It would make sense, but rules-as-written, they're just normal kobolds who happen to have fire resistance and happen to carry shields made of dragon scale. If the PCs take the shields, they don't gain the kobolds' fire resistance. I think this is an example of poor early-4e writing. The ...


5

Something fun and interesting for the druid could be a custom magic item called Staff of Plant Growth or something similar, that has X charges per day (maybe depends on how well she does) and can create grass, small trees, or some other form of plant life. It follows the pattern you've established so far, namely that it's partially class-specific, and this ...


5

Advice from an old role playing book: "The police forces are capable of keeping the peace." Longer explanation: You have a universe. The universe has rules. It has means to enforce those rules (otherwise, other rules would be in effect). But (for practical reasons) the setting has to be somewhat "stable". Stable always means rules and rules always means ...



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