Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Spheres in Mage: Ascension overlap each other and even the core rulebook mentions that sufficiently creative player can solve every problem using nearly any sphere (except some specific situation, like accessing Umbra always needs Spirit). However, that said, I had encountered numerous players that use out of game knowledge to justify their effects that ...


0

I have read only Revised myself and v2 is definitely Revised. Magic is about changing the Tapestry. The more you stretch it, the more rigid it becomes.


2

It seems Mage Revised features what you call Domino effect v2. On page 151: The Domino Effect Wise mages who wish to avoid the nasty consequences of Paradox will attempt to disguise their magic in coincidental Effects. As the number of wild “coincidences” rise, however, they become harder to pull off. As an optional rule, a Storyteller can ...


0

Consensual Reality Magick is hard because of Consensual Reality. The whole world knows that when you stick your hand in your pocket, your hand can only travel a few inches. However, when you do the Life (or Matter) + Correspondence Effect, you stick your hand in the pocket and then reach through space to the bowl by the door where you forgot your frickin' ...


5

The question is answered in Mage: the Ascension Revised FAQ. It seems really hard to build a fast Effect. With penalties for fast-casting, required successes and the like, most mages will have trouble getting more than one or two successes in a turn. This is deliberate; mages should take time to prepare, cast their Effects wisely and use ...


0

As I see the things, matter and energy is the same, but you need to have the knowledge to understand each form. The same happens with life and forces: yes, the organisms use electrical impulses, but understanding how they work is a matter of Life, not Forces. Sometimes those kind of things can be also can be addressed by setting the number of successes ...


20

Because the world is broken and it's your job to fix it. The rules are meant to suggest a world where the Technocracy has locked down magick hard — mages are supposed to take every advantage they can, using Willpower and Quintessence to add successes and lower difficulties, take advantage of magickal tools and rotes to modify die pools, and do lots of their ...


-7

There's no real reason. Far as I can tell, yes, magic is mechanically too hard, and no, I have not found any reason for this. I can go into details of what i've looked at, but ultimately, I feel this is just a fairly generic case of 'White Wolf aren't great at Mechanics'. If you want a game with more useful magic, you'll need to ad-hoc some of the numbers ...


6

Reward his Creativity with Plot As a GM i'm a big believer in the 'Yes, but' school of GMing thought. I say that, but in a game I ran yesterday, I had to say 'no' almost continuously to a player. He was coming from a different gaming culture than mine (less serious), and making a lot of new-player mistakes. It was especially noticeable in the rules-lite, ...


14

What's missing here is an application of paradigm. Every mage believes with absolute clarity and certainty that the world works in accordance with the laws of magick as described by their tradition (or, in the case of orphans, the stuff that the School of Hard Knocks has taught them) — that application of will is how spells are cast and magick gets done. ...


11

1 looks good enough to me. Correspondence alone is enough to teleport stuff. I only know the Revised edition though. Could it be from some earlier edition? 2 and 3 - both initial explanations come from character's limited knowledge. That is - a mage having no Life sphere might rationalize that she can control electrical charges. Except that when she tries ...



Top 50 recent answers are included