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54

As with the vampire-to-lawn-chair problem, it involved Matter magick in Mage 1e. One of the examples listed of "coincidental magick" for Matter was "transmuting bullets into air" with the coincidence of "the gun was never loaded." Now, earlier examples in the book of coincidental magick in the book suggested that to be coincidental magick, the coincidence ...


13

Disclaimer: not sure, but I'll find this funny ^^ On TVTropes under the Table Top section examples we find this In Mage: The Ascension this is a popular method of stopping a bullet, since it is entirely coincidental if done properly (and thus incurs no Paradox) - as long as an observer cannot be fully certain the mage didn't have a Bible or ...


8

This idea goes back to the very first edition of the Mage: the Ascension player's handbook. Stephan Wieck discusses it as an example of how the loose rule system can produce unexpected results. Title : Book of Shadows Date: 1993 Page 203 Subheading: Turning Vampires into Lawn Chairs and Other works of "High" Magick Edit note: The initial version of ...


29

In first edition Mage, vampires fell entirely under the sphere of Matter, and changing the shape of matter was available at fairly low levels. (This was referenced in Book of Shadows, the Player's Guide to Mage, in a subhead: "Turning Vampires into Lawn Chairs and Other Works of 'High' Magick" -- although it wasn't a rote.) The notion that a starting mage ...


6

It depends on how much Paradox is in your wheel when the Backlash occurs. There's a chart on page 195 of the Mage Revised book that addresses this. The usual result is "damage and flaw," with both in proportion to how much Paradox is released. Small amounts lead to bashing damage and a minor, inconvenient flaw. Larger amounts lead to lethal damage (or even ...



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