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2

There're at least two ways... The following let the barbarian actually rage using his own kind of rage more often than normal. "Whirling frenzy is otherwise identical to the standard barbarian rage" (UA 66), so these should work with that, too. The 2nd-level Drd spell blood frenzy [trans] (Spell Compendium 33) causes 1 touched creature to rage as if it ...


0

This isn't how to make money 1) Magic Items sell-- at best-- for what it costs you to make them. So you make nothing out of this if you produce and sell magic items normally 2) Potions, unlike other items, can be produced with a much higher rate of wealth production than 1000 gp/day. Potions-- even maximally expensive potions-- are also among the ...


2

There aren't many options left. Class levels and feats aside; other than scrolls with the Rage spell, magic items that would duplicate rage would be pretty expensive. A domain draught (Magic Item Compendium) of the Passion Domain would give you a rage once per day for a number of rounds equal to cleric level. You don't have a cleric level, so it would be ...


6

You can't make money by making magic items. Not in core, at least (and you did mention you were limited to the core in a comment): The cost of producing a magic item is usually half of the item's base price (or possibly a little more), while the money a player character can gain by selling a magic item is also half of the item's base price. This means that ...


2

This power, as written is unclear. Generally powers like this will specify two things. whether they target creatures or enemies (or allies) whether they target all creatures in the burst or a single creature. This one does not specify either of those things. That means that it's up to your DM to interpret the intent of the power. There is a case to be ...


1

If you take it off, and then put it on again, yes. Otherwise, no. If it's an item your new form can wear, about which the rules are generally pretty forgiving (a dolphin has two ring slots), take it off, change shape, then put it back on again. Is this against the spirit of the rules? Maybe. But it's also kinda meh. I doubt anyone's going to kick up a ...


0

No. Wild shape functions like either beast shape, elemental body or plant shape. All of these are transmutation (polymorph) spells, which means they are subject to the general rules outlined for the polymorph subschool, unless they specifically say otherwise (such as is the case for abilities of your new form you gain). When you cast a polymorph spell ...


1

No. That information can be found in the sidebar here The pathfinder version of Polymorph rules states: Unless the new form is humanoid, all gear merges into the form. Constant bonuses (except AC) remain. Activation items can't be activated. Material components are not accessible while merged into the form. Wild shape functions as a Beast Shape I ...


1

In my 5e Realms I have the Red Wizards sell minor magic items like a polished stone with continual light spell cast on it with permanency, or goggles that have lenses that get darker or lighter based on the amount of light for the daylight challenged. I also have them sell wizard scrolls and if there is spell that my wizard is gonna eventually need they may ...


1

Bonuses of the same type usually do not stack (from different sources). The only bonuses that do stack (alphabetically): Base Attack Bonus Circumstance Bonus Dodge Bonus Save Bonus (Bonus to saving throw, e.g. Rogue's Save Bonus against Poison) Synergy Bonus Unnamed Bonus Every other bonuses of the same type do not stack. Source: SRD DMG, p.21 Very ...


7

Yes In D&D5 everything with a plus/minus stacks with every other thing with a plus/minus. Things that set a value do not stack with other things that set a value but do stack with things that give a plus. For example, the Mage Armor spell sets your AC to 13 + DEX bonus; it does not stack with a draconic sorcerer's natural armor which also sets your AC ...


9

Yes. Normal armour stacks with a normal shield, and there's nothing in the rules to suggest that this is different for magic items. It even allows you to wield/wear multiple of the same item, for example three rings of protection, granting you a total bonus of +3 to AC. The only mention of multiple items with the same effect is the "multiple items of the ...


13

In general, rules in D&D5 mean exactly what they say; no more, no less. The relevant parts of the description are (my emphasis): RING OF SPELL STORING Ring, rare (requires attunement) This ring stores spells cast into it, holding them until the attuned wearer uses them. ... Any creature can cast a spell of 1st through 5th level ...


12

Usually bonuses of the same type don't stack The System Resource Document on Stacking says In most cases, modifiers to a given check or roll stack (combine for a cumulative effect) if they come from different sources and have different types (or no type at all), but do not stack if they have the same type or come from the same source (such as the same ...


0

As other answers point out: no specific rule on magical weapons, making or upgrading. Just to make sure our terminology is aligned with the current edition, in 5e, Enchantment is a school of magic that is about influencing behavior. (Basic, p 80). Enchantment spells affect the minds of others, influencing or controlling their behavior. Such spells ...


2

There is no rule in the core rulebooks which allows for crafting a magic item out of a mundane item, nor any rules regarding enchantments. Therefore, any process your table uses to do this would have to be homebrewed, and the same for as any reversal process. That is, it's up to you how to reverse an enchantment, because (under 5e rules) there is no such ...


4

An Imperfect Solution: So, it's not as tidy as the Teamster's implementation, but I think I've found a somewhat quick and dirty solution to this problem. I found a 7th level feat called Flagellant: Prerequisite(s): Endurance, character level 7th, worshiper of Zon-Kuthon. Benefit(s): You gain a +4 bonus on saving throws against pain effects. ...


11

The DMG (p.128) says (my emphasis): Magic items are the DM's purview, so you decide how they fall into the party's possession. As an option, you can allow player characters to craft magic items. ... You can decide that certain items also require special materials or locations to be created. So, can the item in question re-undergo the ...


10

As far as my knowledge goes, yes, a helm of opposite alignment can affect Demons. As far as Demons&Devils go, they're "just" outsiders born on evil-aligned planes who're generally always evil and have the Evil subtype (see below) forced upon them. There is nothing mechanically preventing a demon or devil from having nonevil alignments (though they'd ...


1

Don't balance the loot. Balance the chances. For example, a highly rare and powerful ring of charming can be nearly unusable if a party tries to defend a city from a siege of an undead army. But a big stack of relatively common holy water could be much more useful. Which is more usable, or completely unusable, depends on the actual game scenario, depends ...


1

Rules as written: No Though you won't see any rule saying "you cant do this", Pathfinder works with rules that say "you can do this". If it doesn't say you can do something, then you can't do it or will have to ask your GM. It's a game of exceptions. We have general rules, and exceptions to those rules, which in their turn have their own exceptions and so ...


2

I find that in order to keep power in check, staying away from raw damage items and + magic weapons is a good bet. Give characters utility items instead. Example: A flamebrand sword with no + damage. All it does is change the longsword damage to fire damage instead of slashing. This has the added benefit of being doubly effective against undead. Give them ...


10

Arguably, this isn't your problem. In most circumstances, you don't give loot to specific characters - you give it to the party, and let them sort out how it gets distributed. Yes, this could theoretically lead to one player hogging all the magic items, but that's a solved problem; As long as your players are aware that they can negotiate how stuff gets ...


3

TL;dr - if you want to maintain intra-party balance, hand out items that fall into a single category. So, if you want to make sure you maintain balance within the party, there are, fundamentally, 2 solutions. The first, and easiest, is not to give anyone magic items. This is an option that 5e totally supports, and your party in particular won't be too ...


5

Mechanics Upon command, a flaming weapon is sheathed in fire that deals an extra 1d6 points of fire damage on a successful hit. To start, "on a successful hit" means "on a successful hit [with this weapon]." Second, "a successful hit" means something specific: You've made an attack roll, and exceeded your target's armor class. Put these two together, ...


4

It doesn't come with an infite supply of dispel magics stored because that would be very overpowered. It, like you want, would allow you to attempt effectively infinite dispels while also attacking as normal. Keep in mind: Dispelling weapon works like spell storing, which only can be applied to melee weapons: This special ability can only be placed on ...


9

Market price for the druid's vestment is 10,000 gp. The 2012 printing of the Dungeon Master's Guide gives the druid's vestment market price in both table and text as 10,000 gp, unlike the Dungeon Master's Guide (2003), wherein the druid's vestment is listed in the table as having a market price of 3,750 gp but in the text as having a market price of 10,000 ...


6

All errata for 3.5 can be found here. However, the errata for the Dungeon Master’s Guide does not mention the druid’s vestment specifically. What it does mention is that, if a table does not match the text of an item’s specific entry, you should favor the text (known as “text-trumps-table” in 3.5 circles). Thus, the druid’s vestment officially costs 10,000 ...



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