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46

First of all: Welcome to DMing! It can be super fun and rewarding, and I hope you enjoy it. One of the things that most DMs learn when they're playing a game that works like 5e is that you don't always have to follow the rules. If it would improve your game, you can totally rewrite or ignore parts of the rules. This is usually referred to as Rule 0, and ...


21

Spells that require concentration end when you die. Aside from that, a spell has to specify that it ends when you die for this to be the case. First up, we have the base duration rules: A spell’s duration is the length of time the spell persists. A duration can be expressed in rounds, minutes, hours, or even years. Some spells specify that their ...


11

To address the problem of (unintentional) metagaming when you ask your players to roll perception. Before play starts, ask what their perception score is. Roll for them, perhaps before the game even starts if it is a predictable event like them visiting the main city. To protect from detect magic, you could have something obvious there for them to detect - ...


11

Okay, first off, do not have them roll perception to see through the illusion unless your players are actively trying to see through it. Players have a passive perception score, which was designed specifically for this purpose. Secondly, there is no way you can hide uses of Detect Magic without hand-waving it once your players question it. However, ...


11

Sorry, no, you can't re-use them. A prepared spell in Vancian systems like D&D's is a one-and-done deal: it's impossible* to retain the full form of it after casting it once, and it's similarly impossible** to keep the full forms in memory in any way. The closest you can get is to avoid casting at least one copy of each spell until you can write it down ...


10

You can put multiple spells on the same scroll Magic Item Creation on Creating Scrolls on Time Required says Scribing a scroll requires 1 day per 1,000 gp of the base price. Although an individual scroll might contain more than one spell, each spell must be scribed as a separate effort, meaning that no more than 1 spell can be scribed in a day. So, ...


10

No, they have not released any such information.


10

Where in the rules does it say that you can use a Wisdom (Perception) check to discern an illusion? Spells and abilities in D&D 5e do exactly what they say they do; nowhere in the description of Wisdom (Perception) is detecting illusions mentioned at all! It is not in Intelligence (Investigation) either. You are ascribing powers to these proficiencies ...


9

Congratulations, that's an awesome premise. Have fun! (And let us know how it turns out). It's expected, indeed beneficial, to make up some magic the occasion. DuckTapeAl's answer has a very good description. A high-level spell which is hard to see through is fine. The key with making something up is that it doesn't break the player's expectations too much ...


6

Familiar is described a few different ways in the PHB, but the context seems generally the same down the board. I will provide a few (not all) quotes if I can find them. Clairvoyance: "...in a location familiar to you (A place you have visited or seen before)..." -PHB pg 222 The entry for Scrying on PHB pg. 273 breaks down knowledge of a place or ...


5

There definitely isn't a lot of information regarding multiple spells on one scroll, but it is possible. According to Scrolls A scroll is a spell (or collection of spells) that has been stored in written form So we definitely can have more then one spell on a scroll. To create a scroll, you'll first need the Scribe Scroll feat, which will allow you ...


4

And what about hiding in plain sight? (No, not this one). In a magic world like D&D, where even the lowest level Sorcerer or Wizard has a handful of Illusions and, as mentioned, Detect Magic at hand, it should come to no surprise that magic is heavily used and relied on. So, I imagine the following dialog when arriving at the city doors: Guard: "Hoy, ...


4

The rules don't say that any check is required to make a spell work, which is how we know that spells happen automatically: casting requires no rolls to be successful in general. However, many spells (like cause fear) do require rolls against your spell save DC at the other end, to see if particular targeted creatures are affected by the spell as it ...


3

...does casting spells require any kind of test before they can be successfully cast? No: you always cast the spell as long as you have an appropriate slot to spend (if the spell is a leveled spell), take the required time, and provide the necessary components. To what I think is your intent: does casting the spell require any kind of test before I see ...


3

In the event that you do roll to hit and pass the 50% chance stated in the description for incorporeal creatures when attacking with spells that don't do damage, no. The damage that it mentions is hit point damage from corporeal sources. The ability damage would not be halved. However, you should take the following into account: An incorporeal creature ...


3

The physical description of a scroll states the following: A scroll is a heavy sheet of fine vellum or high-quality paper. An area about 8-1/2 inches wide and 11 inches long is sufficient to hold one spell. The sheet is reinforced at the top and bottom with strips of leather slightly longer than the sheet is wide. A scroll holding more than one spell has ...


3

You don't have to build the entire environment using one single spell, the fact that the city is an illusion does not have to be the "big reveal". It can be something more subtle than that, and more awesome. A very high bardic knowledge roll could blow whole thing before they have even left the tavern (the bard will feel very clever if that happens.) You ...


2

I can think of four systems that might fit the bill. I'm basing these recommendations on the following assumptions, two of which I'm assuming are implied from the question and the rest based on my experiences running a system specifically focused on one-on-one player combat (Street Fighter: the Storytelling Game, which was centered around group/singular ...


1

Nothing beats DM fiat - so this is probably just a thought exercise. The real solution is to talk to your DM about this issue. Anti-Magic The rules suggest that if you had SR, you might be able to resist the effects of the anti-magic field. This would require a persuasive conversation with a DM though, as RAW only comments on summoned creatures with SR. ...



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