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20

NO Page 203 of PHB Most spells require the chanting of mystic words. The words themselves aren’t the source of the spell’s power; rather, the particular combination of sounds, with specific pitch and resonance, sets the threads of magic in motion. Thus, a character who is gagged or in an area of silence, such as one created by the silence spell, can’t ...


15

Although this has an answer for the Forgotten Realms, the “normal setting” in the PHB is not the Forgotten Realms and there is no canonical answer for just D&D 5e by itself. The DMG goes into more detail about setting, but the basic concept is that the “default” setting of D&D 5e is mostly unwritten so that the DM can build it up from various pieces ...


12

Your understanding is correct The Magic Initiate feat, as you've correctly noted, lets you learn two Cantrips, and Cantrips scale with your character level, not your caster level. This means that your Initiate-Rogue can get the full, scaling power of their Cantrips for the rest of their life! You are also correct on how to calculate your spell attack bonus, ...


11

My background: I've run some adventures using insanity themes. I once had a character who used insanity-magic and was about to go insane, when his player decided the campaign was too dark for him and stopped showing up at my table. I once had a character who used insanity-magic and went insane on purpose because he wanted to kill the party and destroy the ...


11

No, you can't write the spells you know as a Bard into your spellbook. There are 2 ways (outside of levelling as a Wizard) that a Wizard can add spells to their spellbook. The first is by finding them: When you find a wizard spell of 1st level or higher, you can add it to your spellbook if it is of a spell level you can prepare and if you can spare ...


9

In Forgotten Realms lore, manipulation of magic is done through the Weave. The 5e interpretation of this is shown on pg. 206 in the side bar "The Weave of Magic". [Mortals] make use of a fabric of magic, a kind of interface between the will of a spellcaster and the stuff of raw magic. The spellcasters of the Forgotten Realms call it the Weave and ...


8

This spell ... creates a mystic connection between you and the target Its hard to read this and come to your conclusion that the spell has not been cast on you in some way, shape or form. Casting a spell "on" someone does not require that they be the target of the spell; if you are rendered unconscious by a Sleep spell then the spall has been cast on ...


8

From the Sage Advice Compendium including rules on the DM (not the player) deciding what is summoned with a Summon X spell, and dispelling such effects once created: "...Whenever you wonder whether a spell’s effects can be dispelled or suspended, you need to answer one question: is the spell’s duration instantaneous? If the answer is yes, there is ...


7

Your dead high elf wizard isn't a high elf wizard when he wakes up in the Upper Planes. He is a petitioner - identical in appearance and personality, but lacking the skills and abilities (and much of the memories) that he had in life. A petitioner is essentially rooted in the plane it's arrived to, and can't be taken away from it; its ultimate fate is to ...


6

I'm not sure if you'll be able to gracefully staple the 2 systems together -- they're both quite different, with CoC placing more emphasis on weaker characters than D&D's heroes. I also think that Dan B's answer is spot on, in some ways. Including a sanity system can easily cause some players to screw around with it. My personal experience in ...


4

Potions In D&D 5e the rules for potions (located in the DMG) most closely mirror the desired effects you want. Any class can use them, but it is generally either a time-limited effect or it has some drawback (causes addiction or another of the madness conditions, requires a Con save, or causes a negative physical transformation). Also there is a list of ...


3

Yes. Reverse Gravity states: All creatures [...] that aren't somehow anchored to the ground in the area fall upward... It says nothing about flying creatures being unaffected. Therefore they are affected.


2

Yes, as clarified Sorcerers at level 6 normally only have access up to level 3 spell slots, but can use 6 sorccery points to create a level 4 spell slot. Likewise, sorcerers at level 7 normally only have access up to level 4 spell slots, but can use 7 sorccery points to create a level 5 spell slot. As clarified by a tweet from Jeremy Crawford, DnD 5e's ...


2

Yes I don't know of a way to increase the number of actual spell slots you have as a pure wizard, but you can make a trade off by multiclassing. When you gain levels as a full caster (bard, cleric, druid, sorcerer, wizard), the levels all add together to determine the number of available spell slots, which are shared between them. That is, a wizard 5 will ...


1

Looks like any written source: http://www.sageadvice.eu/2016/04/26/book-of-shadows/ A wizard's spell book, another warlocks Book of Shadows, or a scoll all qualify. I could see a DM making one carved on a wall of dungeon, etc, and it would count RAW and RAI.


1

Per the PHB page 110, You can add other ritual spells to your Book of Shadows. When you find such a spell, you can add it to the book if the spell's level is equal to or less than half your warlock level (rounded up) and you can spare the time to transcribe the spell. The only written spell sources are scrolls, a Wizard's spell book, and a Ritual ...


1

The wizard's magic system in D&D came from the ideas of Jack Vance and some of his stories from over fifty years ago. The way you describe it is related to the older versions of D&D. Our colleague here, @aramis, found a good explanation for this: Pre-4E D&D's magic system, ignoring sorcerers, is best explained by a visualization of ...


1

The wording in each cantrip spell indicates that it applies your character level, not your class level. Thus, cantrips increase based on character level, and your assumption is correct -- when your character level reaches 5, your Fire bolt damage will increase to 2d10.


1

The question really comes down to what you mean by "conceal spellcasting." Do you want no one to know you're casting a spell or no one to know you're doing anything at all? Hide the spell, not the actions Disguise Spell does this well. Everyone is aware that you're doing something ostentatious: you're dancing around and speaking in a loud voice. A skilled ...


1

Linguistics also lets you create and detect forgeries and (in PFS) helps when deciphering encrypted messages.



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