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2

By RAW, we have only this: Action: Creating a disguise requires 1d3×10 minutes of work. Using Alter Self or activating some effect on a magic armor to look different is one thing, to look exactly like someone else is a completely different matter. When you create an elaborate disguise, such mimicking the appearance of someone, you are not just using ...


4

In a stricter reading of the RAW, I think the answer is yes, a breath weapon's area of effect always extends to its fullest size / covers the maximum area possible, and causes the damage given in the rules. Witness: No attack roll is necessary. The breath simply fills its stated area. – d20srd (and the DMG3.5 has the very same information.) ...


18

Yes, by making a caster level check and meeting some requirements The relevant rules are all in the Magic Items - Scrolls section of the DMG. Here's a copy from the SRD. There are two steps: Decipher the Writing The writing on a scroll must be deciphered before a character can use it or know exactly what spell it contains. This requires a read ...


4

Note: I haven't played SR3 much, my experience is more with SR4. Also, note: This situation can easily turn into an arms race. People have different reasons for playing untouchable characters (grossly simplified: from inexperience to inferiority complex). Take into consideration whether it will make the game more fun for your group when you start bringing ...


6

It depends on how much Paradox is in your wheel when the Backlash occurs. There's a chart on page 195 of the Mage Revised book that addresses this. The usual result is "damage and flaw," with both in proportion to how much Paradox is released. Small amounts lead to bashing damage and a minor, inconvenient flaw. Larger amounts lead to lethal damage (or even ...


0

I am not expert in Shadowrun system, but I think some common ground GM "tactics" could help here. These are just general ideas - again I just barely know Shadowrun setting. Being in a world with an advanced technology and magic altogether gives you some great leverages. You could, for example: have him chased by some sort of special squad made by ...


10

Possibly, but most of the time it won't cause an additional effect Even if you inferred or house ruled that the rules for touching willing creatures for the purposes of spell targeting also applied to touching inanimate objects, none of them would be affected unless the spell already allowed multiple target objects. The key limitation is the spell targeting ...


2

1. Radius Patterns follow Grid Lines The ring version of Wall of Fire says this about its area of effect: a ring of fire with a radius of up to 5 ft. per two levels If you turn to the back of the DMG (p. 307) or look at this answer, you can see some patterns for radius spread effects. All of them spread along square edges. They're a ring of squares, ...


6

It seems like no, an unwilling subject can't resist an Illusion Disguise spell. Pages 13–14 describe Resisted Spells, but unlike some spells that have a target (e.g., mind control spells), Illusion Disguise does not have a Resistance note. That said, if you're the GM and your world's magic works in such a way that you think the target should be able ...



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