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51

Define the Consequeces of Success and Failure Up Front This answer addresses a very similar question. I think everything I said there applies equally here. In short: if you explicitly define the consequences of success and failure, players are less likely to misunderstand the information and run off doing some nonsense. Let It Ride In your case, there's ...


27

Players working together like this is normal and expected. It's all fine as long as the player with the present PC is not bothered by the input from the other players and has the final say. Fate Core, page 4 Both players and gamemasters also have a secondary job: make everyone around you look awesome. Fate is best as a collaborative endeavor, with ...


27

Typecasts in LARPs can be a serious problem. In the future, I'd suggest avoiding getting into this situation in the first place - ask to play characters you're not usually cast as. This is difficult, so to the best of your ability, but the less you allow yourself to fall into a typecast, the less others will typecast you in turn. That being said, it won't ...


21

There's a distinct demarcation in games between the Player and the Character. And in most games when such things come up, it's relegating the player to the same position as the character- and trying to force the player to solve problems is if he is the character. There is nothing wrong with that approach, in any game. And there's also nothing wrong with ...


21

Alignment Usually Isn't Hard To Determine Alignment often isn't that hard to figure out anyway. Spells that can detect it are readily available, some classes (like Paladins) can detect evil as much as they want, and in certain cases you can discern it from their actions (a Cleric casting a Good spell can't be evil, because a Good type spell can't be cast by ...


18

Fast-forward When it becomes obvious that the players are going to spend a lot of time, and do everything they can think of, before it becomes they finally accept that there’s nothing there, and they’re not under any time-pressure that makes it important to keep track of how much time they spend trying, just skip that step. You try everything you can ...


16

In addition to the excellent suggestions already given (I'm rather partial to "Let It Ride" myself), here are two more: Roll the checks yourself in secret. Without the knowledge that they rolled poorly, the potential for players to metagame in this way is essentially eliminated. They may continue searching for longer than seems appropriate to you, but it ...


15

To reiterate my answer here, you should conspire with your players against the characters. There are too many ways of passing information through inaction or mechanics use to adequately conceal important aspects of the environment. Instead, focus on an honest player relationship (assuming that everyone is comfortable with this sort of game, of course), ...


14

Talk to them So, at the risk of being obvious, consider talking to them directly about the type of game you want to play and also ask what type of game they want to play. You don't have to tell them how you feel they should play, and probably shouldn't. But you absolutely can and should say things like, "I like to present challenges with multiple ...


13

Younger players frequently tend either toward following the lead of other players at the table, towards combat, or both. If they have all spent less than 7 months playing, then they still have little experience in playing as a whole. That said, you should always ensure that the players have a fair idea of what to expect from your games if you aren't going ...


10

I would say that any kind of information gathering roll (perception, traps, weather forecasting, interaction with NPC), any of them, should be rolled behind the Narrator/DM/Master's screen. You can allow the player to roll theirselves, but they should never see the results. The rationale behind hidden rolls is that players can not metagame around ...


8

The game was called FRUP. It was never released (one of the casualties of the collapse of Guardians of Order), but the story of it — and the preview of the game from 1995 — are available at WhatIsFRUP.com.


7

I will address your concerns one by one. Would this give too much information to the players? That depends. Since this is your world, you decide what "too much" means. There is nothing wrong with having personal flares and unique elements in your story. As long as it is internally consistent. I'm afraid that that knowledge could start influencing ...


7

My technique here consists of two sentences spoken to players. When it's a boolean (yes/no) roll situation I roll some dice and say: "Well, you find nothing... and nothing finds you." When it's a "we-keep-searching-indefinitely" situation I just ask: "How long will you continue to search if you find nothing?" (Sometimes I amend this to "if nothing ...


6

If you as the DM really get bored you can always generate a distraction or otherwise trigger a time-based event that would have been initially benign. Regardless of if they're paranoid for good reason (low enough rolls even barely) or for red herring soup, if you as the DM need to progress, external forces can intervene. Party says "we'll take twenty to ...


6

That's not necessarily metagaming. If a group of adventurers are walking through a dungeon, they may expect traps. That's a totally reasonable thing for adventurers the expect. If they come to a room that seems like it probably should be trapped, then they're likely going to want to search more thoroughly. If they search as thoroughly as they can (for ...


5

There is actually a system that already deals with something like this (though not quite on the scale you propose). In White Wolf's Exalted games, many of the magical effects that players can deploy reveal to those paying attention which kind of supernatural being they are (though visually all beings are human). Since there is a setting-defined inquisition ...


5

For your specific issue where they're constantly looking for something where nothing exists you may need to react differently depending on the circumstances, but there are two basic scenarios. Time-dependent and not. If time is of the essence, keep track of how much time they're wasting per search check. You'll want to let them know this, of course - simply ...


4

Have a discussion Stop the game, have a discussion. A lot of times, before I even start playing a dungeon crawl game, I'll let people know "There's no traps or secret doors in this game. I'm not going to hide awesome magic swords in trashpiles. I don't like digging through the tunnels spending 20 minutes searching each room." or maybe, "If things are ...


4

There must be some successful, humane way of introducing the players to a setting they have no clue about. It's all about making that kind of translation a smooth and gentle. Take it in two parts. 1) The players need a rundown. 1a) .. of the things which local everyday people know about the region 1b) .. of the things which local everyday people know ...


3

They engaged the system's mechanics—rolled a Spot check—and failed to find anything. Just tell them to move on. If they want to spend more time on it, that's their problem, and you should advance what's going on around them while they do. If the system allows them to recheck a skill roll, let them. I'd balk at more exotic skill checks. “How does Lore have ...


2

It really depends on the kind of world you want to portray and on the edition you're playing. For instance, D&D 3.5e has several spells that work differently based on the alignement of the targets. Knowing if it will work as intended in advance might be a major tactical advantage (working for both sides). In 4e, instead, alignment only matters when ...


2

Like others have mentioned, this brings alignment to the foreground, at least when it comes to magic users. From a setting perspective, I see two major ways that society might react. One extreme is balkanisation. The good magic casters and nations will tend treat evil casters (and probably other classes as well, if detected through detect evil) as evil ...


2

There seems to be already a sense of metagaming with a dose of "powergaming". Your players complain about encounters being too hard—then they should run. You need to have a meeting beforehand and tell them that the path of an adventurer is fraught with peril: most new adventurers die early in their career. If they are that low level, perhaps they ...


2

Players using knowledge about monsters they should not have, and players searching a room over and over, are two entirely different problems. It seems to me like you are more interested in the second problem, and this seems, to me, like you are allowing your players to describe rolls instead of actions. If your player says "I start carefully navigating ...


2

I don't LARP. That said here's what I'd try: Coordinate with the Organizers to become a role that half-way meets the expectations of the players and win them over from there. The players expect a messy scene, when you're around? Be the battle hardened mercenary that accompies the players. Stand next to a pile of bodies and smoke your victory cigar telling ...


1

This ends up becoming the most common answer I have to a lot of problems: the game you want to play, and the game they want to play, is very different. So, yes, sit down and talk to them, but understand that if they really don't want to play the kind of game you're running, there's no changing their minds. It's like you can't make anyone like your favorite ...


1

As a DM I always rolled search rolls for the characters. This allowed me to fudge rolls that were important to the plot and covertly roll when an elf passed a hidden door or if they were getting off track. Its amazing how well a random die roll can refocus the party. If the party becomes convinced that there is something there to find but they believe ...


1

All of the answers above are very correct, but truth be told, the only way to know what will happen is to play test it for a while, see what happens, take carefully notes, talk to the players afterwards, and after a several sessions decide if its something you want to keep. But definitely give it time for the players to get use to it, maybe "let it happen" ...


1

While this isn't very different from what others have proposed, it's still a noteworthy variation: the PCs are just born. The game starts as "you become aware". This of course is only doable in a setting where exists a race which "can do stuff" as soon as it's born, but since this is a custom setting, you could arrange that. Also consider that this is ...



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