Hot answers tagged

56

I'm going to make one critical assumption about your gaming group. If it's untrue, I don't know if my answer will be helpful: The friendship of the people at the table is more important than the game you're playing. Going forward I'm assuming you're all friends foremost, and you play games as a form of mutual recreation. Now, on to my answer. TL;DR: This is ...


53

There are so many ways to enjoy roleplaying games that we sometimes — often, actually — forget that fact and just assume that how we play is the way. Unsurprisingly, this results in unpleasant things when different ways to play collide and nobody notices that hey, maybe these are different and don't mix well! What you (personally or as a group) need to do ...


46

So, your problem is that you have an enthusiastic player... This is a good problem to have. First and foremost: talk to your player in a candid and friendly manner about your concerns and stress that you want to find a solution where the both of you are happy. This is just normal social interactions and not really within the scope of this site. Having said ...


38

metagaming was the worst thing that could happen in role-playing Well, this is just plain wrong; not having fun is the worst thing that can happen. It sounds like you're finding this out. I think you recognise that there is no right way to role-play or, more precisely, there are as many wrong ways as there are gaming groups because no group is consistent ...


36

Talk with your players Your players are here, presumably, to play a game. They aren't out to get you. Remember that it takes two players to make a conspiracy. Politely ask them not to send whispers containing relevant in-game information. They probably aren't doing this to be malicious or trying to trick you - they maybe just don't see why it's such a big ...


28

What you're running into is the difference between social costs and economic costs. Typically, the 'cost' for metagaming is a social one. When you metagame in a group that doesn't like metagaming, your friends get disappointed in you, and you feel embarrassed and ashamed for ruining other people's experience. What you've done is effectively replaced that ...


26

It seems there are three distinct parts to this question. The player isn't following his character sheet RPGs are games. Games are played for fun. Something about the character as written on the sheet isn't fun for your player. He is thus ignoring the sheet and doing what he considers fun. Here are some options. Talk to him about playing a role. Modify ...


22

Yes, the name/class/level relationship was originally an in-game term depicting a level of power and social status. Some in-game effects of this were the limitations on level advancement for AD&D(1e) Monks and Druids (details below), or prohibitions against Assassins (Blackmoor) having followers. Originally, the Name Level threshold opened up new ...


22

"Please Don't Do That." Players are not born with the knowledge that meta-gaming is [often considered to be] harmful. Not all of them, anyway. But I've found that the vast majority of players, once asked or coached gently a few times ("How exactly does your character know that?") are perfectly capable of performing the mental fire-walling necessary to ...


21

PCs can speak as a free action. Strictly, a round is six seconds, which bounds what they can say in that time. It generally makes for a better game if you are very lenient with that time (talking characters mean invested players). There are no rules on how players speak. You can set whatever rules you like at your table for what table-talk is acceptable,...


20

On @Ahriman good answer, I want to add a third method. Split the party, not in space, but in time. When you have separate players, and the knowledge obtained by some can influence the rest, but not so much the other way around, you can make first play the latter, and then the former. In your example, you play first with the buried player. You ask him ...


16

I see two easy ways to handle this. Both have their advantages & disadvantages. Trust your players and just play out the scenario with everybody around the table. Keeping the actions of the trapped player unclear can help greatly (he doesn't hear the bell, but something else happens in the coffin). Meanwhile the party above ground has to locate the ...


13

As I read the question, there's two possibilities. Possibility One The first possibility is that your player really does think this is what his character (as he envisions it) would do. If so, the term for this is "My Guy Syndrome." Yes, really: He's doing stuff that's detrimental to the fun of the table as a whole, justifying it as staying in-character and ...


12

What you're asking about is meta-gaming, when a player uses information the character does not have. There are a few different ways you can approach it. Prevent It When the characters split up, the players split up. If one group of characters is doing something the other characters should not be privy to, make the other players leave the room. This works ...


11

The closest would be OD&D and AD&D 1st edition and level titles. Particularly at 9th to 12th level at what was called "Name level" where the game gave explicit support for making the character a leader of his profession. The various level titles are evocative of various positions in the profession that the class represent, and are generally arranged ...


10

Don't mind that they find out the reference Think of it as watching a movie where some random bypassers enter in a room, and get killed by a huge monster hidden in the shadows. Then come the heroes, and they are also eaten by the same monster because this is what would made sense, since they didn't knew about the monster. That would be a very boring movie. ...


9

I typically use non-combat mapping to help show the relative distances between things and the players. This is typically done using a "You are here" dot for the players and simple lines for relevant features. I even use notations on the map to denote distances given the map is often "not to scale". This means that I still build for a combat, but the players ...


9

It's a game table emulation, not a game table As the DM, you need to both recognize and accept that it's a different game/gaming experience when played in the Roll20 (or similar) venue. The DM and the players lose the synergy and intimacy of the table top experience and the in person experience. (From a personal experiential level, this is what I miss ...


9

"Hi Pete and welcome to our group. We play differently here and metagaming is encouraged here. I hope you won't have much problem with it. I am sorry if this is not what you were looking for, but I'd encourage you to give it a try anyway"


9

First of all, player communication is vital. If your player feels ignored, he will only start to pester more, especially the eager typew you have there. However, there is information players should not gain, and some of the questions you told are that case. Let's go through those examples you gave: So, what god will I be able to meet soon? Can I ...


8

With my long-standing group, we've got an "in-joke" to handle situations like this. When a player starts asking too many questions (or questions that are too pointed, or I just want to change the subject), I'll simply answer with "fnord." (This can be written or verbal, depending on whether we're chatting or e-mailing.) Although it's not the real ...


8

If your objection is that a character that acts chaotic has "lawful" written on his character sheet, then depending on the version of D&D you can either ignore it completely since it has no game effect, or you can kick in some rules for alignment change. "My Guy" is when the behaviour damages the game, not when the behaviour conflicts with stated ...


7

The game mechanics that have the most benefit are incentives. Reward the player that plays with role-playing as their focus. Give an indication or hint as to why the reward is being added. "As character X has made this decision, he/she finds X reward as a result." As a result you have encouraged good role-playing instead of decisions based on gaming. ...


7

Usually the right answer is to not let the players split the party. Splitting the party means that all the players whose characters aren't in the scene will be bored. They might disconnect from the game, start checking their phones, et cetera. You, as the DM, are part of every scene, so you might not realize how boring this is for the players whose ...


7

There is not really a hard and fast rule for this, it's a matter of table rules for the most part. Table rules are simply the 'soft' rules that you, the GM, set for your players while they are playing at your table. Different GMs handle it different ways depending on their preferences and their player's preferences. Per the Rules as Written, this means that ...


6

It just shows how bad of a punishment XP loss is. There are some groups where that would work, but more often than not it doesn't. I would have done the same: if you can buy (or share with a friend) a vital info for your XP, why not go for it. It's likely that by taking away their XP you didn't show they can't do it, you just showed they can, for XP. Not to ...


5

This is world specific, and not really a RAW or RAI question. The answer depends on the world the DM has built. Specifically: How common are elves in your world? If they are common it is more likely that more people know about it. How Common are magic casters? If magic is rare in your world, than it would be less likely to have come up, and even the elves ...


5

If one of my players where to say "Do I believe him?" I would say "I don't know, that's up to you (or your character)." If they asked "Does he look like he's lying?" Then I would say "Roll an Insight check." To do it properly, I would roll an Insight check on their behalf and report the result. If they succeeded, I would say "You detect this or that sign ...


5

Different Players enjoy different styles It seems you try to decide what is more fun for your player. If he is an experienced grown up player, you don't have to decide what is good and bad for him. I know a girl who reads a lot of books, but always reads the last pages first so she knows how it ends. I think spoiling herself this way is crazy, but she ...


4

Have the one-shot be a story told to the current PCs This is a tool I've used in the past to great effect. The key is, you have to leave one character alive (whether it be a PC or a NPC) to tell others what happened (because what big bad doesn't love being feared by everyone who hears of his victories?). Then, in the future, the character (as an NPC) can ...



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