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54

At our gaming table, while role playing, the characters would say a +1 sword is of the First Power. A +2 would be of the Second Power, etc. Worked for us, and it sounded pretty epic. Once, we heard of a sword of the FIFTH power. We were like... whoa.


43

Whatever your preference. It's never explicitly stated anywhere as far as I know. Some people think it breaks with immersion, while others think that you'll go crazy if you can't call out the numbers or keep having to talk around them. Most people I know and play with refer to gear with their mechanical terms (ie: "My +1 Orcbane Shortsword") when talking ...


36

Talk with your players Your players are here, presumably, to play a game. They aren't out to get you. Remember that it takes two players to make a conspiracy. Politely ask them not to send whispers containing relevant in-game information. They probably aren't doing this to be malicious or trying to trick you - they maybe just don't see why it's such a big ...


28

Players working together like this is normal and expected. It's all fine as long as the player with the present PC is not bothered by the input from the other players and has the final say. Fate Core, page 4 Both players and gamemasters also have a secondary job: make everyone around you look awesome. Fate is best as a collaborative endeavor, with ...


26

Whichever you prefer. Typically when discussing items after they have been identified the enhancement bonus of a weapon is completely dependent on whether or not your group would find mentioning the numbers to be atmosphere-breaking and unwanted. If you're speaking to a character after they have found and identified a weapon they'll need to know the level ...


23

There's a distinct demarcation in games between the Player and the Character. And in most games when such things come up, it's relegating the player to the same position as the character- and trying to force the player to solve problems is if he is the character. There is nothing wrong with that approach, in any game. And there's also nothing wrong with ...


20

On @Ahriman good answer, I want to add a third method. Split the party, not in space, but in time. When you have separate players, and the knowledge obtained by some can influence the rest, but not so much the other way around, you can make first play the latter, and then the former. In your example, you play first with the buried player. You ask him ...


17

What a PC believes shouldn't be determined by a dice roll. Instead, give them clues depending on the results of their insight check. For instance, if the PCs are interrogating an NPC regarding a string of robberies, an Insight Check DC10 might allow the PCs to notice that the NPCs eyes widened when shown the torn scarf found at the mayor's house, despite ...


16

I see two easy ways to handle this. Both have their advantages & disadvantages. Trust your players and just play out the scenario with everybody around the table. Keeping the actions of the trapped player unclear can help greatly (he doesn't hear the bell, but something else happens in the coffin). Meanwhile the party above ground has to locate the ...


15

The traditional answer to this is, "Write it down and pass a note." In the 21st century, I might change that to, "Send a text." Of course, nothing prevents your players from passing the note around amongst themselves, or reading it aloud. In some circumstances, "Take one player aside and talk to him or her." However, I think you might be asking two or ...


12

Suspend disbelief, harder You're already suspending disbelief to buy into your game's setting. You put yourself into another person's mindset to play your character. Extend to techniques farther in order to omit relevant metagame knowledge from your roelplaying. Ask you self "If I didn't know X, what would my character do here?". That's what you should ...


10

Don't Let Fear of Metagaming Keep You From Playing The Game When you have knowledge that your character doesn't, it can be frustrating. You'll often feel like you're helpless to deal with a challenge that would be trivial if your character just knew one stupid thing. If you're frustrated, you're not having fun, so the solution here isn't to just tamp down ...


9

It's a game table emulation, not a game table As the DM, you need to both recognize and accept that it's a different game/gaming experience when played in the Roll20 (or similar) venue. The DM and the players lose the synergy and intimacy of the table top experience and the in person experience. (From a personal experiential level, this is what I miss ...


9

I typically use non-combat mapping to help show the relative distances between things and the players. This is typically done using a "You are here" dot for the players and simple lines for relevant features. I even use notations on the map to denote distances given the map is often "not to scale". This means that I still build for a combat, but the players ...


7

It sounds like you have a problem with players metagaming (acting on information the player has, but his character doesn't), and you're fixing that by having the players explicitly inform each other. This usually works fine as long as players don't have to do it too often – but if you're requiring them to relay the info to the group every time they ...


6

Considering that the "plus" of the enchantments is a quantifiable attribute when identifying items or creating magical items I would imagine it reasonable that some manner of describing this attribute would exist in the game world. For the sake of simplicity I would stick with the +1, +2, +3, but other ways of describing would exist. Maybe even it's own ...


5

One tip that can be useful, when this is important, is to give up some of the control. This is especially useful for situations where your character might know/figure out the information that you know, or might randomly decide to do the advantageous thing. Assign a probability to either figuring out the information, or doing the beneficial thing. "Yeah, ...


3

Use confusion! The player in the coffin needs not to know where he is. He could be buried in a coffin, but he could as well be in a coffin that has been locked (but is otherwise still above earth). You have to make that very unclear to him and its important that he does not know, nor can reasonably guess. The group on the outside finds two coffins: One in ...


3

Whichever you prefer (or, to better say, whichever your DM preferes), but Magic Item Compendium p. 5 quotes Thordek, the iconic dwarf fighter, naming his +3 armor by plus and bonus. It's not unreasonable to suppose that, in a world where enhancements come in fixed chunks, merchants and crafters have deviced a system to name them. My personal choice is ...


2

It's possible that I'm sticking my nose in where it's not merited here, but here's my take on it, specifically regarding knowledge/insight/discern motive-type checks: - Chris Perkins once said that the players should know that everything the DM says is true - that is, if the DM says "You feel like she's telling the truth" or "You can't read the writing, but ...


2

This same problem often comes up in the campaign I'm currently a part of. Some of us (including me) are more used to roleplaying in general, while others are newer and have difficulty not using meta-knowledge or assuming that just because one player knows something, everyone does. The way I personally deal with it is that I try to think in terms of my ...


2

I recommend getting Paizos "Flip-Mat." They're $14 and can be used with dry erase or wet erase. Other similar products also exist, such as Battlemat by Chessex. You can also make your own using a sheet of acrylic from the hardware store and the patience to draw a 1" grid on it (on the underside, so you can draw scenes on the other). Ask the players to state ...


2

What I would do in this situation, to add drama and tension (in a good way) is start off the play session with this scenario, and ask the person playing the trapped character come early, before everyone else so we can talk about what he's going to do to keep himself entertained since he'll be out of play for a bit while the part is trying to find him. I'd ...


1

The character in the coffin gets no information from outside, and has no available actions other than ringing or not-ringing the bell, right? So I would do one of two things: As others have suggested, get a "script" from the trapped player by asking what he'll do assuming nothing happens. Translate this into a sequence of rings on particular combat rounds ...


1

What I used to do: My battlemap was one of the old ones that we marked on with water soluble markers and had a 1" square grid superimposed on it. The players' figures were always on the map whether there was anything going on or not. When something arose that became a game scene, a quick sketch of the markers outlined where they were -- be it pub, ...


1

Sometimes it's funny to lampshade the problem: make a joke out of how your character has no idea what's going on. "This rock golem isn't taking damage from my sword! Clearly my sword is too much like a scissors to damage the rock. As everyone knows, to truly defeat rock we must use paper! I start whacking the rock golem with its one weakness: a rolled-up ...


1

Avoid the problem There are two situations: the players initiate combat; and, the enemies initiate combat. Situation 1: When the players initiate combat When the players are thinking about starting a fight they can state something like: PC: I survey the area to assess our tactical position. At that point you can draw/build/setup your combat map. ...


1

... when the other person is telling the truth? 5e really has two social skills: Intimidate and Persuasion. To me, the Persuasion skill includes convincing someone that you are telling the truth. And this cuts both ways. Convincing someone that something is true may be no more or less difficult than convincing them that something is false, regardless of ...


1

The DM should be describing information about the character's environment, not telling the players what their characters think, which is entirely the prerogative of the players. Telling the player "you don't see any evidence that the illusionist is lying or telling the truth" is a better solution because then the player simply cannot metagame based on that ...



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