Hot answers tagged

55

I'm going to make one critical assumption about your gaming group. If it's untrue, I don't know if my answer will be helpful: The friendship of the people at the table is more important than the game you're playing. Going forward I'm assuming you're all friends foremost, and you play games as a form of mutual recreation. Now, on to my answer. TL;DR: This is ...


54

At our gaming table, while role playing, the characters would say a +1 sword is of the First Power. A +2 would be of the Second Power, etc. Worked for us, and it sounded pretty epic. Once, we heard of a sword of the FIFTH power. We were like... whoa.


51

There are so many ways to enjoy roleplaying games that we sometimes — often, actually — forget that fact and just assume that how we play is the way. Unsurprisingly, this results in unpleasant things when different ways to play collide and nobody notices that hey, maybe these are different and don't mix well! What you (personally or as a group) need to do ...


43

Whatever your preference. It's never explicitly stated anywhere as far as I know. Some people think it breaks with immersion, while others think that you'll go crazy if you can't call out the numbers or keep having to talk around them. Most people I know and play with refer to gear with their mechanical terms (ie: "My +1 Orcbane Shortsword") when talking ...


38

metagaming was the worst thing that could happen in role-playing Well, this is just plain wrong; not having fun is the worst thing that can happen. It sounds like you're finding this out. I think you recognise that there is no right way to role-play or, more precisely, there are as many wrong ways as there are gaming groups because no group is ...


36

Talk with your players Your players are here, presumably, to play a game. They aren't out to get you. Remember that it takes two players to make a conspiracy. Politely ask them not to send whispers containing relevant in-game information. They probably aren't doing this to be malicious or trying to trick you - they maybe just don't see why it's such a big ...


28

What you're running into is the difference between social costs and economic costs. Typically, the 'cost' for metagaming is a social one. When you metagame in a group that doesn't like metagaming, your friends get disappointed in you, and you feel embarrassed and ashamed for ruining other people's experience. What you've done is effectively replaced that ...


26

Whichever you prefer. Typically when discussing items after they have been identified the enhancement bonus of a weapon is completely dependent on whether or not your group would find mentioning the numbers to be atmosphere-breaking and unwanted. If you're speaking to a character after they have found and identified a weapon they'll need to know the level ...


21

Yes, the name/class/level relationship was originally an in-game term depicting a level of power and social status. Some in-game effects of this were the limitations on level advancement for AD&D(1e) Monks and Druids (details below), or prohibitions against Assassins (Blackmoor) having followers. Originally, the Name Level threshold opened up new ...


20

On @Ahriman good answer, I want to add a third method. Split the party, not in space, but in time. When you have separate players, and the knowledge obtained by some can influence the rest, but not so much the other way around, you can make first play the latter, and then the former. In your example, you play first with the buried player. You ask him ...


19

What a PC believes shouldn't be determined by a dice roll. Instead, give them clues depending on the results of their insight check. For instance, if the PCs are interrogating an NPC regarding a string of robberies, an Insight Check DC10 might allow the PCs to notice that the NPCs eyes widened when shown the torn scarf found at the mayor's house, despite ...


16

I see two easy ways to handle this. Both have their advantages & disadvantages. Trust your players and just play out the scenario with everybody around the table. Keeping the actions of the trapped player unclear can help greatly (he doesn't hear the bell, but something else happens in the coffin). Meanwhile the party above ground has to locate the ...


15

The traditional answer to this is, "Write it down and pass a note." In the 21st century, I might change that to, "Send a text." Of course, nothing prevents your players from passing the note around amongst themselves, or reading it aloud. In some circumstances, "Take one player aside and talk to him or her." However, I think you might be asking two or ...


13

Suspend disbelief, harder You're already suspending disbelief to buy into your game's setting. You put yourself into another person's mindset to play your character. Extend to techniques farther in order to omit relevant metagame knowledge from your roelplaying. Ask you self "If I didn't know X, what would my character do here?". That's what you should ...


10

Don't Let Fear of Metagaming Keep You From Playing The Game When you have knowledge that your character doesn't, it can be frustrating. You'll often feel like you're helpless to deal with a challenge that would be trivial if your character just knew one stupid thing. If you're frustrated, you're not having fun, so the solution here isn't to just tamp down ...


10

Don't mind that they find out the reference Think of it as watching a movie where some random bypassers enter in a room, and get killed by a huge monster hidden in the shadows. Then come the heroes, and they are also eaten by the same monster because this is what would made sense, since they didn't knew about the monster. That would be a very boring movie. ...


10

The closest would be OD&D and AD&D 1st edition and level titles. Particularly at 9th to 12th level at what was called "Name level" where the game gave explicit support for making the character a leader of his profession. The various level titles are evocative of various positions in the profession that the class represent, and are generally arranged ...


9

It's a game table emulation, not a game table As the DM, you need to both recognize and accept that it's a different game/gaming experience when played in the Roll20 (or similar) venue. The DM and the players lose the synergy and intimacy of the table top experience and the in person experience. (From a personal experiential level, this is what I miss ...


9

I typically use non-combat mapping to help show the relative distances between things and the players. This is typically done using a "You are here" dot for the players and simple lines for relevant features. I even use notations on the map to denote distances given the map is often "not to scale". This means that I still build for a combat, but the players ...


9

"Hi Pete and welcome to our group. We play differently here and metagaming is encouraged here. I hope you won't have much problem with it. I am sorry if this is not what you were looking for, but I'd encourage you to give it a try anyway"


7

It sounds like you have a problem with players metagaming (acting on information the player has, but his character doesn't), and you're fixing that by having the players explicitly inform each other. This usually works fine as long as players don't have to do it too often – but if you're requiring them to relay the info to the group every time they ...


7

The game mechanics that have the most benefit are incentives. Reward the player that plays with role-playing as their focus. Give an indication or hint as to why the reward is being added. "As character X has made this decision, he/she finds X reward as a result." As a result you have encouraged good role-playing instead of decisions based on gaming. ...


6

Considering that the "plus" of the enchantments is a quantifiable attribute when identifying items or creating magical items I would imagine it reasonable that some manner of describing this attribute would exist in the game world. For the sake of simplicity I would stick with the +1, +2, +3, but other ways of describing would exist. Maybe even it's own ...


6

It just shows how bad of a punishment XP loss is. There are some groups where that would work, but more often than not it doesn't. I would have done the same: if you can buy (or share with a friend) a vital info for your XP, why not go for it. It's likely that by taking away their XP you didn't show they can't do it, you just showed they can, for XP. Not to ...


5

One tip that can be useful, when this is important, is to give up some of the control. This is especially useful for situations where your character might know/figure out the information that you know, or might randomly decide to do the advantageous thing. Assign a probability to either figuring out the information, or doing the beneficial thing. "Yeah, ...


5

If one of my players where to say "Do I believe him?" I would say "I don't know, that's up to you (or your character)." If they asked "Does he look like he's lying?" Then I would say "Roll an Insight check." To do it properly, I would roll an Insight check on their behalf and report the result. If they succeeded, I would say "You detect this or that sign ...


5

This is world specific, and not really a RAW or RAI question. The answer depends on the world the DM has built. Specifically: How common are elves in your world? If they are common it is more likely that more people know about it. How Common are magic casters? If magic is rare in your world, than it would be less likely to have come up, and even the elves ...


4

Have the one-shot be a story told to the current PCs This is a tool I've used in the past to great effect. The key is, you have to leave one character alive (whether it be a PC or a NPC) to tell others what happened (because what big bad doesn't love being feared by everyone who hears of his victories?). Then, in the future, the character (as an NPC) can ...


4

It's very important to remember, above all, IT IS A GAME. The worst possible thing you could every do is take "totally fun and awesome Friday night game night" and turn it into "forced, no fun, role play night" First explain that in this group meta-gaming is part of the fun. You want to throw cheesie-poofs, laugh out loud, and make silly decisions based on ...



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