Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I am going to share my ideas on gaming, from various systems over many years. While it does not directly address the OP's question per se. I think it might be helpful. Meta gaming is a reality of the process, how you handle it should be part of your gaming philosophy and you players should have a basic understanding of your philosophy. Here are some of the ...


1

I don't like the "You don't remember anything" way. I use this method with my players (the game is Pathfinder, but I think this advice is quite general): I don't let know them the DC of the roll If they have success, I say them clearly useful informations ("trolls are weak to fire") If they fail, I say them some silly lore or wrong informations ("trolls ...


2

The core of the problem is that when this happens, the player has two choices: a) make their character act particularly ignorant about this thing b) connive some way for their character to figure it out Neither of which is fun. Another option, is to use your GM powers, and modify a small aspect about the monster. "Yes, you remember trolls are generally ...


4

This can be difficult in many games, since while it's all very well to tell people they have some sort of moral obligation to separate player and character knowledge, feeling obliged to compromise your character's safety or the party's goals in the name of "good play" can be an unfun catch-22 for some players. And of course acquiring all that player ...


5

Here's a range of options, suited to different playstyles. Also you can mix-and-match. "You Don't Know": If the player fails a roll, the GM says they don't know. This is probably the simplest approach. What about "botching?" Shouldn't you make it more than just "You don't know." Enh, maybe they still don't know. Even in games that feature special ...


6

The typical way to do this is to roll for the player where only you can see the result (such as behind a screen or your hand). Any time you are rolling for hidden information, you're justified in making the roll yourself. Looking for secret doors? You roll, and tell what they do or don't find. Racking their brains to remember something useful about trolls? ...


11

Be unpredictable The reason that the player can do this is that the rules are well-known. In order to avoid this problem, introduce some mystery. When the player rolls a skill check where the quality of the result shouldn't be known by the character, you should also roll (in secret of course). If your roll is in the high half of the die range, then treat ...


10

In D&D 4e as well as 3.5, "fumbling" a skill check on a natural 1 is a house rule only - by rules as written a natural 1 on a skill check is not even an automatic failure, much less a fumble. Here's the 3.5 rule - 4e is very similar. http://www.d20srd.org/srd/skills/usingSkills.htm#skillChecks: Unlike with attack rolls and saving throws, a natural ...


1

My party uses G-talk, we all sit in front of a PC and message each other and or the DM if it is secretive. (I bought my laptop for that purpose only! - THE CONVICTION!) :)


2

Ever think about not holding these gaming sessions in person? Computer aided voice chat, mumble, or a conference call on you're phone can have some serious advantages if you need to do a game with information compartmentalization. I haven't gm'd a gaming a session but with modern communication tech, it occured to me that it might be a solid way to get it ...


2

Writing this in case other people who have the same problem with me are looking for a solution. After combining all the ideas here (and some stuff I thought myself), I decided to use code words to signal other players and give other players code words so they can signal me if they are going to do something secret. Like, say "It's Monday right?" when you ...


4

I know what I would use. Whatsapp. Actually, any other text application on your phone would do, assuming you all have one. If you want to be absolutely certain not to drop hints, turn off your mobile data, type out a message to each of your friends, and then switch on data. They'll all get the messages together so they don't have data like how long you took ...


2

Lots of great responses. What I do is: 1. Make sure that everyone gets notes. 2. Pregame info with my players, separately 3. Make sure that if I am giving a player info that is top secret, then I will give him info unrelated that is not really a secret. I will write a note of some info and then asking if he is going to tell the party and then tell the party ...


5

Just as a specific note-passing technique: index cards. They're a good size, nice and sturdy, fit a fair bit of information, and are reasonably inexpensive.


7

I've run exactly this scenario to extremely good effect (a Star Wars game in which one of the characters was an Imperial double agent). It's possible to surprise the players without cheating, but you've correctly identified a major problem which you must avoid. There are three parts to the solution: If meeting with a player privately, you must meet with ...


1

I'm not a really experienced DM but there is a method that I use to keep metagaming about the plot to a minimum. Add plot twist when the players are least expecting them, and don't add plot twists when the players are expecting them. Sounds simple, right? My last session was probably the most immersive game I have ever been in. The players went to a ...


1

Headphones and music! Whoever isn't at the scene puts on headphones for a minute. If you have them do this at random times for no real reason for cover-up (that is when something concerns only some players, but the others actually could just as well know it), then it will be hard to tell when you are really talking about something super secret.


7

So, you have player A who is the spy, B and C who are loyals. Call in A for normal information exchange/private time. Call in B and have the Prince tell him that he's heard a rumor that someone may be betraying the cause. He knows that based on the rumor that it is likely either the PCs, or some other little cluster (if it exists). However, have the Prince ...


40

Just to add to something others have been saying: If there is any secret information in the game, then Pass notes to every player, constantly! Occasionally scribble random gibberish like "Look at this paper and smile knowingly." and pass it to a random player. Make sure everyone gets used to it as "one of your GM quirks". Mix this up with meaningful ...


4

If it's a short information exchange (and not a discussion per say), then I would go with exchanging a paper between you and the player(s). However, it is pretty difficult to manage that kind of situation for a long period of time and I think you should arrange things in the story so that the group will have to join their efforts against a common threat ...


25

I thought about making up an excuse to talk to all players in the bathroom during stuff like the assassination example above so everyone will be suspicious of each other but it sounds like too much hurdle. Unfortunately, that's your answer. Metagaming in this case isn't going to be deliberate, but it's going to be hard to avoid. If you constantly ...


15

I've run games with strict information compartmentalization like this, it really aids the immersion. Here's what you can try to do in order to not give away too much. Take other people aside too, not just for "super secrets" but for experiences they have outside the rest of the group. So if someone gets sent to the library to research, take them aside, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included