New answers tagged

-4

I think many of the options above are great, and are probably excellent practice for your real life negotiation skills. https://www.udemy.com/negotiation-problems-solved/ My parties frequently split. Sometimes just in town, but sometimes for separate quests or during battle to different areas. Sometimes people have died on their own, and I decide whether ...


0

Dice, dice baby. Usually, events in RPG's are determined by a combination of role-playing and dice rolls. When there's a big gap between player knowledge and character knowledge, rely heavily on dice rolls. It can be slightly jarring, but players will generally react well, because it's fair and rolling dice is always fun. Maintain Immersion In my ...


21

"Please Don't Do That." Players are not born with the knowledge that meta-gaming is [often considered to be] harmful. Not all of them, anyway. But I've found that the vast majority of players, once asked or coached gently a few times ("How exactly does your character know that?") are perfectly capable of performing the mental fire-walling necessary to ...


7

Usually the right answer is to not let the players split the party. Splitting the party means that all the players whose characters aren't in the scene will be bored. They might disconnect from the game, start checking their phones, et cetera. You, as the DM, are part of every scene, so you might not realize how boring this is for the players whose ...


12

What you're asking about is meta-gaming, when a player uses information the character does not have. There are a few different ways you can approach it. Prevent It When the characters split up, the players split up. If one group of characters is doing something the other characters should not be privy to, make the other players leave the room. This works ...



Top 50 recent answers are included