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5

If one of my players where to say "Do I believe him?" I would say "I don't know, that's up to you (or your character)." If they asked "Does he look like he's lying?" Then I would say "Roll an Insight check." To do it properly, I would roll an Insight check on their behalf and report the result. If they succeeded, I would say "You detect this or that sign ...


0

During my long experience of RPG (around 20 years) I have had such problems time to time. It was actually the reverse: a couple of "Beer & Pretzel" gamers would join the group and spoil the atmosphere by playing too "lightly". It is all a matter of being in sync with the rest of the group, so it is the new "orthodox" gamer to be out of place in your ...


21

Yes, the name/class/level relationship was originally an in-game term depicting a level of power and social status. Some in-game effects of this were the limitations on level advancement for AD&D(1e) Monks and Druids (details below), or prohibitions against Assassins (Blackmoor) having followers. Originally, the Name Level threshold opened up new ...


10

The closest would be OD&D and AD&D 1st edition and level titles. Particularly at 9th to 12th level at what was called "Name level" where the game gave explicit support for making the character a leader of his profession. The various level titles are evocative of various positions in the profession that the class represent, and are generally arranged ...


4

It's very important to remember, above all, IT IS A GAME. The worst possible thing you could every do is take "totally fun and awesome Friday night game night" and turn it into "forced, no fun, role play night" First explain that in this group meta-gaming is part of the fun. You want to throw cheesie-poofs, laugh out loud, and make silly decisions based on ...


9

"Hi Pete and welcome to our group. We play differently here and metagaming is encouraged here. I hope you won't have much problem with it. I am sorry if this is not what you were looking for, but I'd encourage you to give it a try anyway"


38

metagaming was the worst thing that could happen in role-playing Well, this is just plain wrong; not having fun is the worst thing that can happen. It sounds like you're finding this out. I think you recognise that there is no right way to role-play or, more precisely, there are as many wrong ways as there are gaming groups because no group is ...


51

There are so many ways to enjoy roleplaying games that we sometimes — often, actually — forget that fact and just assume that how we play is the way. Unsurprisingly, this results in unpleasant things when different ways to play collide and nobody notices that hey, maybe these are different and don't mix well! What you (personally or as a group) need to do ...


3

Two players are giving hints to others even when their characters aren't around. As this is cheating for me, they have been losing some EXP for it You haven't mentioned what the nature of the "hints" are, so I'm making some assumptions here. If they're things that those players' characters know and have had no opportunity to communicate to the other ...


3

Premise: I absoultely agree with the solutions promoted by BESW (currently ahead) and with several others. Talking with the players and solving the problem out of the game is king. I will however show you two other possible ways to mitigate or prevent the problem. The first is just marginally better than yours. It only works with minor metagaming ("Since ...


1

I find that both my experienced players and my new players benefit from encouraging roleplaying the character, instead of rollplaying. The example usually given is that a switch for a trap is accessible by players because that's how D&D works - the DM wouldn't dare NOT put one in, because that would make it unfair to the players and make the DM out to be ...


1

As others have already said here it sadly boils down to a social problem and not a problem solveable by game mechanics. I had a similar case myself where I just put out 0 xp to the guy in question time and time again but still he didn't learn until he was thrown out of the group. That experience aside it sounds like you had a solid group and the addition ...


3

I will give one bad way (in my experience) to handle it, so you are not tempted to try it: Separate the players based on player character location. This sort of meta-gaming used to bother me a lot more than it does now, and I would fret about it and try to prevent it by calling players to the side or even into another room for extended stretches. It ...


7

The game mechanics that have the most benefit are incentives. Reward the player that plays with role-playing as their focus. Give an indication or hint as to why the reward is being added. "As character X has made this decision, he/she finds X reward as a result." As a result you have encouraged good role-playing instead of decisions based on gaming. ...


28

What you're running into is the difference between social costs and economic costs. Typically, the 'cost' for metagaming is a social one. When you metagame in a group that doesn't like metagaming, your friends get disappointed in you, and you feel embarrassed and ashamed for ruining other people's experience. What you've done is effectively replaced that ...


55

I'm going to make one critical assumption about your gaming group. If it's untrue, I don't know if my answer will be helpful: The friendship of the people at the table is more important than the game you're playing. Going forward I'm assuming you're all friends foremost, and you play games as a form of mutual recreation. Now, on to my answer. TL;DR: This is ...


6

It just shows how bad of a punishment XP loss is. There are some groups where that would work, but more often than not it doesn't. I would have done the same: if you can buy (or share with a friend) a vital info for your XP, why not go for it. It's likely that by taking away their XP you didn't show they can't do it, you just showed they can, for XP. Not to ...



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