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0

As has been said above, traps can do more than just damage. Why are you just running straight damage traps anyways? If he's meta gaming, he's gaming you, not the system. Here's a big list of other things traps can do, so you can set him straight. Inflict a condition, such as * poison * unconscious * charmed (very funny!) * restrained * paralyzed * blind * ...


2

Option One: This really isn't a problem. The other players aren't complaining, and so we can see that this is not really that big a deal. Relax, go with the flow, and chuckle along with the group when a 60-pound block of stone drops on his head, the player and stone both freeze briefly, and then the stone splits cleanly down the middle and the fighter ...


1

I think @nitsua60 has a pretty good point there with the idea that things should be discussed with everyone. However, I've had groups where we discussed things and decided to say "F* disarming, lets send the tank down the hall and consequences be damned" If you personally dislike that behavior and don't want to reward it, alarming, disabling and ...


14

Disclaimer: this post is largely a distillation of the excellent advice found in AngryGM's post on metagaming.* All quotes are from that post. (Meta-disclaimer: Angry's posts feature excellent advice seasoned with rude and vulgar language.) 0. Your question To answer your question as posed: yes, there are in-game ways to change this behavior, well-covered ...


21

What's wrong with what he's doing? As far as he can tell, this is a good strategy. He's exceptionally tough, and running through traps has worked for him in the past, so he believes it'll be fine in the future. If you don't want this strategy to work, you'll need to try a different kind of trap. A few options come to mind: more damage traps that ...


6

Spontaneously I see three approaches to this problem, besides talking to him about his character still feeling the pain and that it is not really a good idea to take the damage willingly when there is a way to avoid it. 1. Make the traps hit multiple targets For example a trap in form of a gas leaking and spreading along the whole corridor and affecting ...


0

I would say that human commoners would likely not know of this trait. However. since the rules say that elves do not sleep but instead enter a "trance-like" meditative state then anyone who has adventured with elves or even spent a small amount of time exposed to elven society would be aware of this fact. Recalling that information when it's needed and ...


5

The fundamental spirit behind the "My Guy Syndrome" discussion is this: Roleplaying is a hobby, so the underlying goal is for all of us to enjoy ourselves. Roleplaying games flow best when we can be honest about our desires and intentions, both with our friends and our own selves. Those principles still apply here. I think one reason1 that you're not ...


2

Change his alignment If he acts chaotic, present him as such. Toss the attention that chaotic characters earn at him. If he insists he is lawful, have the guards tell him to tell it to the judge. More importantly, do not get caught up in his character sheet, but rather design games based around how you know he is going to play. Don't let what is on paper ...


4

The two most obvious ways to describe this type of behaviour (to me) are Reverse MyGuy Syndrome, where the actions are not what MyGuy would do, as written on the sheet, or simply Poor Roleplaying where a character's listed traits are ignored in order to profit from the situation at-hand. Anyway... Firstly: Is it actually a problem? From your description ...


1

From my gaming days... Let your creativity move you away from a stock module. 1) Let the enthusiastic player help you. Can they design monsters, backstory, aspects of the world. Can they own part of the experience. 1) Use a story for inspiration. Diversify your sources. 2) Have the players help you create aspects of the world. In our case, we founded ...


8

If your objection is that a character that acts chaotic has "lawful" written on his character sheet, then depending on the version of D&D you can either ignore it completely since it has no game effect, or you can kick in some rules for alignment change. "My Guy" is when the behaviour damages the game, not when the behaviour conflicts with stated ...


13

As I read the question, there's two possibilities. Possibility One The first possibility is that your player really does think this is what his character (as he envisions it) would do. If so, the term for this is "My Guy Syndrome." Yes, really: He's doing stuff that's detrimental to the fun of the table as a whole, justifying it as staying in-character and ...


3

My question is, is there a name to this kind of player? "Poor sport". That's the expression I'd use when confronting such a player at my table, at least if I really had the ammunition to demonstrate that I perceive him to be dishonest. I'm not saying you should do this, because you know more about the situation than I do, but, as presented, this sure ...


29

It seems there are three distinct parts to this question. The player isn't following his character sheet RPGs are games. Games are played for fun. Something about the character as written on the sheet isn't fun for your player. He is thus ignoring the sheet and doing what he considers fun. Here are some options. Talk to him about playing a role. Modify ...


1

The way I did it was to create a Facebook Group that recaps the week's session. That way, it is a discussion about what everyone thinks about what happened and what will happen. Like you, I had a player who would try to extract extra information. I told him, after trying to gently encourage him, to post it on the group page. After he started posting there, ...


1

I use two methods to keep players interested (but not disruptive) and prevent metagaming. First, I absolutely talk to my friends about what is going on in the campaign and what I have planned. I will even use it as an opportunity to help build their character backgrounds by involving them in things they would know (e.g. one character is a soldier, so I let ...


1

Metagaming isn't inherently bad. My recommendation is to talk with this player about what their goal is with gaining the extra information. When this player does get extra information, what do they do with it? If they use the information to put their character into interesting situations, make the plot more fun for the other players and in general advance ...


2

I like to keep an air of mystery about the adventure, so the fact that he keeps reading the GM section of the rulebook (which contains monsters and gods, and all their rules and stats) and pointing out things like "oh, finally I know what that encounter was!" bothers me. The idea that published setting content is a secret is very old-school. There's ...


3

I may not be of much help here as I do all my session's on the fly, and it sounds like you are big into planning. But I have had people like this in the past, and I agree with a lot of what Sardathrion said about incorporating their ideas in ways they might not be thinking about. To me it sounds like this player is invested in the game, but not nessisarily ...


8

With my long-standing group, we've got an "in-joke" to handle situations like this. When a player starts asking too many questions (or questions that are too pointed, or I just want to change the subject), I'll simply answer with "fnord." (This can be written or verbal, depending on whether we're chatting or e-mailing.) Although it's not the real ...


5

Different Players enjoy different styles It seems you try to decide what is more fun for your player. If he is an experienced grown up player, you don't have to decide what is good and bad for him. I know a girl who reads a lot of books, but always reads the last pages first so she knows how it ends. I think spoiling herself this way is crazy, but she ...


1

I'm not entirely sure about how you run things at your table. I think you need to understand there is a MAJOR difference between what a player character (eventually) can do, and what all other creatures in your world (that you control) can do. Basic Assumptions Rules about everything a player character can do should always be available to the player. He ...


10

First of all, player communication is vital. If your player feels ignored, he will only start to pester more, especially the eager typew you have there. However, there is information players should not gain, and some of the questions you told are that case. Let's go through those examples you gave: So, what god will I be able to meet soon? Can I ...


49

So, your problem is that you have an enthusiastic player... This is a good problem to have. First and foremost: talk to your player in a candid and friendly manner about your concerns and stress that you want to find a solution where the both of you are happy. This is just normal social interactions and not really within the scope of this site. Having said ...


2

The characters have had days and nights in the game world to talk to each others about tactics and strategy, and to train together. It's unfeasible to require players to actually play all this. So, in my mind, players talking during combat is reflection of this. It could even be seen as flashback scene, though I've never played it as such (would be ...


0

If you don't let players discuss tactics in combat, to their detriment, you might find them spending a lot of time out of combat discussing tactics. From a strict simulationist point of view, this is reasonable, but it can lead to a slow game. Were I the player being treated this way, I might first try "Well this isn't happening now, we would have discussed ...


1

It is largely a matter of the Social Contract in your gaming group. See The Big Model. In a hardcore simulationist group, players (including the GM) would interpret the rule as allowing for 6 seconds of speech per character, possibly less if you also want to hear other characters. In most groups, short discussions are allowed, as the characters can be ...


21

PCs can speak as a free action. Strictly, a round is six seconds, which bounds what they can say in that time. It generally makes for a better game if you are very lenient with that time (talking characters mean invested players). There are no rules on how players speak. You can set whatever rules you like at your table for what table-talk is acceptable,...


1

It might be helpful if you specify whether you want a by-the-rules Pathfinder answer, or a more general DM/GM advice answer. I have DM/GMed a lot of different pen and paper RPG systems, and in most of them, player to player communication is not specifically regulated by the rules because of the issues you hinted at with your question. In scenarios that ...


7

There is not really a hard and fast rule for this, it's a matter of table rules for the most part. Table rules are simply the 'soft' rules that you, the GM, set for your players while they are playing at your table. Different GMs handle it different ways depending on their preferences and their player's preferences. Per the Rules as Written, this means that ...



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