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34

There are no official stats for Sheep. But we won't leave you hanging... Other Animals. A book of this size can't contain statistics for every animal inhabiting your D&D campaign world. However, you can use the stat block of one animal to represent another easily enough. For example, you can use the panther statistics to represent a jaguar, the ...


13

Let's start off with some names. We have Derek the Darkstalker, Bob the Beholder, and Nancy the non-Darkstalker. It's the middle of combat, and the map currently looks like this: . . . . . . . . = 5 ft square . . . N . . . N = Nancy . . . B . . . D = Derek . . D . . . . B = Beholder . . . . . . . At this point, neither Derek nor ...


11

Turn back one page from the Acolyte Background The art on PH p. 125 (the first page of the Backgrounds section) seems to depict an acolyte. The figure carries a mace (commonly associated with clerics in D&D) is touching what appears to be a holy symbol brooch, and is wearing a white cloak. Several similar character sketches throughout the Backgrounds ...


6

There's no such thing as a single "official" acolyte appearance — an acolyte is just a low-rank or trainee priest. Use any art for a cleric that suits the specific NPC and religion you desire to portray.


5

Probably not. The closest parallel I see is Improved Uncanny Dodge, which prevents a barbarian from becoming flanked. This defense denies a rogue the ability to sneak attack the barbarian by flanking him, unless the attacker has at least four more rogue levels than the target has barbarian levels. I read this as an implication that only the actual ...



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