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57

Short simple answer here. No you can't, you can only mount or dismount once per turn. Player's Handbook, page 198: Mounting and Dismounting Once during your move, you can mount a creature that is within 5 feet of you or dismount.


40

This question is an example of how a DM should deal the concept of Rules Lawyer vs Playability in the game. Given the way the rules are written, there's a loophole that can be exploited. Yes, it's possible to string those actions together. However, logically, take a minute to think about what you ask. In a round (which is 6 seconds), can you: move 120', ...


27

I'd say that this is against the spirit of the rules and an exploit, and disallow it. Don't forget that the DM has much more opportunity to exploit the rules than you do, and if you're playing strictly to the letter then you're gonna run into problems with any system. It highly reminds of of the peasant rail gun, which to quickly summarize: Get roughly ...


22

I would say no. The PHB on page 195 specifically states: you don't provoke attacks of opportunity when someone or something moves you without using your movement, action, or reaction. Under the Beast Master archetype on page 93 it says: You can command the beast where to move on your turn (no action required). Since the beast counts as something ...


17

This is one of these questions where James Jacobs overrules RAW with RAI. RAW: No. Reach Weapons: [...] Most reach weapons double the wielder's natural reach, meaning that a typical Small or Medium wielder of such a weapon can attack a creature 10 feet away, but not a creature in an adjacent square. [...] A Tiny monkey's natural reach is 0 ft., double ...


12

A medium sized creature is in all of the squares of his mount (no matter the size). However there are exceptions to this rule. If the medium sized creature has an aura, you declare an origin for that aura and it emanates form that square (rather than the entirety of the mount) If a close burst power is used, you pick an origin square for the power ...


12

By the rules If you want to use mechanics as much as possible, you could start by having the horses frightened or even panicked (not much difference for NPCs). The storm being what scares them, "fleeing away from the source" is technically impossible so it turns into random fleeing. In such situations, horses tend to scatter. To deal with the situations, ...


12

Your assumption is correct. There is no reason why being a Ranger's Animal Companion would cause a mount to forget or ignore its training. The quote you've included contains the key piece of information here: You can control a mount only if it has been trained to accept a rider. So Dash, Disengage, and Dodge are things it has been trained to do when a ...


11

Yes, you can. Also, a lance requires two hands to wield when you aren’t mounted. So as long as you are mounted, you can use a lance in one hand. The Dual Wielder feat allows you to use two-weapon fighting with any one-handed melee weapon, so this works fine. As for the damage die, the damage die for the lance is a d12, and there's nothing in its ...


10

Preface A rider and their mount share a single character's set of actions (one standard, move and minor action, one immediate action between turns). The player may use each action on either the rider or the mount. Most commonly, you'll have the mount take a move action and the rider take a standard action to attack. Importantly, though: the mount and rider ...


10

Given that you appear to have all the rules already, it seems that the problem is in interpretation. Given that, my view is : Should the mounted PC be treated as a normal mount for a PC, losing his turn and becoming subordinate to the rider? Answer: No. The mount is the same level and equal in power If 1 is "no", do they share initiative counts? ...


10

Essentially no, they both move together even if you only target one of them. From the Compendium Also pg254 in the Rules Compendium Forced Movement: If the mount is pulled, pushed, or slid, the rider moves with it. If the rider is pulled, pushed, or slid and the mount isn’t, the rider can have the two of them move together. Otherwise, the rider is ...


10

If the mount could attack the foe, then it can count as flanking.


9

Your mount has one surge per tier. It does not have a second wind. This is defined in the glossaryDDI Monsters and NPCs: As a general rule, monsters and nonplayer characters have a number of healing surges based on their tier: one healing surge at the heroic tier (1st–10th levels), two healing surges at the paragon tier (11th–20th levels), and three ...


9

Some things to take into consideration: First and foremost, most Wardens are melee characters, their marks are distributed burst 1, they do have ranged mark triggers, but their actual mark punishment is a melee power. If they aren't in melee, they aren't doing their job. Second, don't forget opportunity attack rules, if the character exits a square ...


9

Riding Constructs These constructs list details indicating they are supposed to be ridden. The brass steed (Heroes of Battle 153-4) is in a section entitled Battlefield Steeds, and its description includes its carrying capacity as do many mounts. The clockwork pony and clockwork stallion (Monster Manual 4 32-3) each have the special ability rider ...


9

Ask your DM if you can reflavor the bite as a kick. If you have trouble envisioning your horse biting foes (though horses can actually bite quite hard, and will do so if provoked) ask your DM if the attack can be reflavored as a kick with front or rear legs as appropriate. Horses can kick hard enough to break skulls; the bite stats are, if anything, weaker ...


9

Looking at the rules for mounted combat (PHB p. 198) and flying (PHB p. 191), you should bear the following in mind: The griffon acts and moves on the player's turn, and can only take the Dash, Disengage and Dodge actions. If the griffon falls prone or has its speed reduced to 0, it stops flying and falls to the ground. If the griffon is forced to move, or ...


9

The example turn you described is legal concerning RAW. You would be able to break up your movement and attack both targets as long as your mount has enough movement to get you there. As for the opportunity attack, any time you move outside of a creature's reach without taking the Disengage action you would provoke an attack of opportunity. Luckily, in your ...


8

The two together occupy the same space (in all dimensions) as the mount alone. Source - Rules Compendium p253, also the Compendium Also, note that the previous page states that the mount must be at least one size category larger than the rider.


8

There's nothing in the rules that mentions any sharing of reflex saves between mount and rider. Each rolls a separate reflex save. Unless it's stated specifically, a mount and rider do not share any abilities such as Evasion with each other, either. To address the issue of realism clashing with the game rules, I don't think this is out of bounds with ...


8

The mount and the rider each have their own full turn with movement and action. When a player mounts an animal and decides to control it: The initiative of a controlled mount changes to match yours when you mount it. The mount's position in the turn order changes but it keeps its own turn on which: It moves as you direct it, and it has only three ...


8

As far as the rules are concerned, yes, he can use unarmed strikes from the top of his horse. Just as you've noted, the Mounted Combat rules don't place any restrictions on how you can attack. If you need help justifying this in-game, you can consider that an unarmed strike is defined as: a punch, kick, head-butt, or similar forceful blow So if it ...


7

I’m reasonably certain that the rules never say. So far as I can tell, it seems you can just... use a move action to mount something. There’s nothing saying you have to be anywhere near it at all, which is dumb. (For that matter, I also don’t see any rules about the mount having to be OK with you getting on, which is also dumb. Though you ...


7

Basically, what you see in the various rules is an underlying assumption about Mounts and their interaction with their riders. From the perspective of a PC, 99% of the time, the mount is a creature which does not exhibit a high degree of intelligence or independent thinking. (AKA a horse or other large animal, or magically controlled being) The mount ...


7

I would give the players two options: A) The player being ridden is a dumb mount and is treated as such by the rules, sharing actions, initiative counts, skills and turns. (Obviously this would be a bit boring for one character) B) The player being ridden is not a mount at all, it just happens that the pixie is using him or her as a mobile platform. (And ...


7

Yes, It's odd that mounts aren't explicitly noted as allies anywhere that I could find. The Rules Compendium p254 notes that all mounts can attack at -2, although few attack on their own. Mounts are explicitly targeted separately from their rider (ibid). I find it hard to believe that a DM would not allow the mount to be the target of a beneficial effect ...


7

I'm currently in a campaign that has grown to a ridiculous size (9 players, although one of them doesn't really show up any more). Because of some half-joking actions of the only Dwarf in the party early in the campaign, we all have dragons as mounts, now, including my Warden. The biggest pitfall to be wary of is to not turn mounts into another party ...


7

Yes, you can, and with even more versatility than you thought. Unlike previous editions or some other games, movement is not a type of action in D&D 5e. It is a resource that you use, almost like a currency that you spend. At the beginning of your turn, you have movement to use equal to your speed. Think of this as a deposit into your account. You can ...



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