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12

A medium sized creature is in all of the squares of his mount (no matter the size). However there are exceptions to this rule. If the medium sized creature has an aura, you declare an origin for that aura and it emanates form that square (rather than the entirety of the mount) If a close burst power is used, you pick an origin square for the power ...


10

Essentially no, they both move together even if you only target one of them. From the Compendium Also pg254 in the Rules Compendium Forced Movement: If the mount is pulled, pushed, or slid, the rider moves with it. If the rider is pulled, pushed, or slid and the mount isn’t, the rider can have the two of them move together. Otherwise, the rider is ...


10

Preface A rider and their mount share a single character's set of actions (one standard, move and minor action, one immediate action between turns). The player may use each action on either the rider or the mount. Most commonly, you'll have the mount take a move action and the rider take a standard action to attack. Importantly, though: the mount and rider ...


9

Given that you appear to have all the rules already, it seems that the problem is in interpretation. Given that, my view is : Should the mounted PC be treated as a normal mount for a PC, losing his turn and becoming subordinate to the rider? Answer: No. The mount is the same level and equal in power If 1 is "no", do they share initiative counts? ...


8

There's nothing in the rules that mentions any sharing of reflex saves between mount and rider. Each rolls a separate reflex save. Unless it's stated specifically, a mount and rider do not share any abilities such as Evasion with each other, either. To address the issue of realism clashing with the game rules, I don't think this is out of bounds with ...


8

Some things to take into consideration: First and foremost, most Wardens are melee characters, their marks are distributed burst 1, they do have ranged mark triggers, but their actual mark punishment is a melee power. If they aren't in melee, they aren't doing their job. Second, don't forget opportunity attack rules, if the character exits a square ...


8

Your mount has one surge per tier. It does not have a second wind. This is defined in the glossaryDDI Monsters and NPCs: As a general rule, monsters and nonplayer characters have a number of healing surges based on their tier: one healing surge at the heroic tier (1st–10th levels), two healing surges at the paragon tier (11th–20th levels), and three ...


8

The two together occupy the same space (in all dimensions) as the mount alone. Source - Rules Compendium p253, also the Compendium Also, note that the previous page states that the mount must be at least one size category larger than the rider.


7

I would give the players two options: A) The player being ridden is a dumb mount and is treated as such by the rules, sharing actions, initiative counts, skills and turns. (Obviously this would be a bit boring for one character) B) The player being ridden is not a mount at all, it just happens that the pixie is using him or her as a mobile platform. (And ...


7

I’m reasonably certain that the rules never say. So far as I can tell, it seems you can just... use a move action to mount something. There’s nothing saying you have to be anywhere near it at all, which is dumb. (For that matter, I also don’t see any rules about the mount having to be OK with you getting on, which is also dumb. Though you ...


6

I'm currently in a campaign that has grown to a ridiculous size (9 players, although one of them doesn't really show up any more). Because of some half-joking actions of the only Dwarf in the party early in the campaign, we all have dragons as mounts, now, including my Warden. The biggest pitfall to be wary of is to not turn mounts into another party ...


6

Based on current RAW, the answers aren't quite as simple as the questions - in fact, part of them brings up another question which I'll be shortly sending to WotC support. First, let's break up your first question a bit: 1a. Are a rider and mount considered different targets? Yes. For the purposes of targeting, the rider and mount are separate ...


6

Basically, what you see in the various rules is an underlying assumption about Mounts and their interaction with their riders. From the perspective of a PC, 99% of the time, the mount is a creature which does not exhibit a high degree of intelligence or independent thinking. (AKA a horse or other large animal, or magically controlled being) The mount ...


4

Taking a single level of Beastmaster (Complete Adventurer) gives you the animal companion of a level 4 druid (it gives the class feature at class level+3), and you can take the natural bond feat (which is practiced spellcaster for animal companion, +3 to effective druid level). Also, the Wild Plains Outrider can be squeezed in (and advances druid or paladin ...


4

The rider falls prone in an adjacent square From the DMG and the Rules Compendium[ddi] Falling Prone: If the mount falls prone, the rider is dismounted and falls prone in an unoccupied space of the rider’s choice adjacent to the now-prone mount. However, if the mount is flying when it is knocked prone, it instead falls. The rider isn’t dismounted unless ...


4

Blinded - This will not affect a standard mount much at all. Blinded does not inhibit movement so the mounted player can allocate a move action to the mount as usual. If the mount should attack, it would take the usual penalties. Dominated - A mount can only take a standard/move/minor action if the mounted PC allocates that action to the mount. In ...


4

Yes, It's odd that mounts aren't explicitly noted as allies anywhere that I could find. The Rules Compendium p254 notes that all mounts can attack at -2, although few attack on their own. Mounts are explicitly targeted separately from their rider (ibid). I find it hard to believe that a DM would not allow the mount to be the target of a beneficial effect ...


4

I've done this. My Pixie, Sisyphus, used the grab rules to grab onto and ride along with the other PC. Normally grabbing would result in immobilization, however he was not grabbing and trying to hold the PC still, we just used the same basic actions to balance riding along. Standard Action: This action to initiate a grab is for unwilling opponents. We ...


4

This might seem a bit obvious, but killing the mount usually works. Most mounts encountered in play are horses, and most horses don't have more than the standard hit dice for their kind, so a sneak attack or damaging spell can reliably kill a mount in one shot after the first few levels of play. If you need or want to keep the mount alive, nonlethal damage ...


3

The trip maneuver inflicts the prone condition. I would think that involves being off the mount on the ground. The NPC Codex tactics are a bit notoriously not always rules correct, but the Horse Monk from that book has this as his tactics: During Combat The monk prefers to fight from horseback, and uses Ride-By Attack and Lunge to hit foes so he faces ...


3

While not tripping, there are various things that could work as they do allow you to move opponents in various ways. It might however come down to DM variance. Drag: Grabbing the target and hauling him out of the saddle by main force(straight backward) Bull-Rush: May need a jump check(Flying tackle) Reposition: Drag an opponent around(with the exception ...


3

The 4ed Barbarian has Primal as his power source, and that gives him some energy attacks when he rages (fire, frost etc.). This can be avoided if it seems out of context with the character, or the energy types could be homebrewed out to give him just more of a martial feel. The weapon you refer to is the khopesh, an egyptian sword/axe that exists in DnD, ...


2

I've been trying to figure this out for awhile, and here's my answer: Depends on who does it. Your mount acts on your initiative count as you direct it. You move at its speed, but the mount uses its action to move. ... If your mount charges, you also take the AC penalty associated with a charge. If you make an attack at the end of the charge, you ...


2

The rules in regards to mounted combat are a little muddy. For Reference, here is Overrun As a standard action, taken during your move or as part of a charge, you can attempt to overrun your target, moving through its square. From the Mounted Combat Rules: Your mount acts on your initiative count as you direct it. You move at its speed, but ...


2

Any general tips, advice, or anything I can get to make my experience as grand as possible? A gnome fighter, you say? I'd recommend one of two paths, if the halfling outrider, cavalier and whatever other mounty prestige classes aren't available from the complete books. If you can play lawful good "Dudley Do-Right" do so. Take a level of cleric and ...


2

Wild Cohort is great for mounts, since they level with you, and it’s based on character level so you can do it with a Fighter or whatever you like, instead of being tied to Druid or Ranger. Beyond that, remember that you can buy armor for mounts. The Mounted Combat feat will help them out a lot too, but it’s only once per round, so armoring them ...


2

Clarifying some misconceptions It is my understanding that you and your mount basically share a move action but not necessarily a standard action. Incorrect. You move with your mount (on your mount’s move action), but it does not consume your move action. There are limited options for what you can do with that move action, but you still have it. That’s ...


1

The Withdraw action is a special action but doesn't actually require that you move a full double move - it merely means that you withdraw from the combat (and mechanically that the first 5' you leave you leave in a way that does not provoke attacks of opportunity. You can then move as much or as little as you want after that first 5' of movement and you do ...


1

I would decide based on this criteria: How are you splitting XP? If the mount gets XP split with it, then it gets its own actions. If it doesn't receive XP, then it doesn't get its own actions. Since a PC obviously gets a cut of the XP, then it gets its own actions. Edit: I'm thinking of the rules for ranger companions here too. If you look at those ...


1

I think that options that have been entirely overlooked thus far have been the ability to have your mount altered magically. There are a large number of spells that can enhance your mount and be made permanent. Of particular note would be the Druid spell that gives an animal human level intelligence and then your mount can start taking class levels for ...



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